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Leslie Stevenson [70]Leslie Forster Stevenson [10]Leslie F. Stevenson [5]L. Stevenson [5]
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  1. Leslie Stevenson (forthcoming). Who's Afraid of Determinism? Philosophy:1-20.
    Because of the idealizations involved in the ideas of a total state of the world and of all the laws of nature, the thesis of all-encompassing determinism is unverifiable. Our everyday non-scientific talk of causation does not imply determinism; nor is it needed for the Kantian argument for a general causal framework as a condition for experience of an objective world. Determinism is at best a regulative ideal for science, something to be approached but never reached.
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  2. Leslie Stevenson (2014). Kant on Freewill, Grace and Forgiveness. Diametros 39:125-139.
    How do our secular reflections on freewill relate to the theological tradition of human freedom and divine grace? I will pursue this question with reference to Kant, who represents a half-way house between Christianity and the atheism of other Enlightenment thinkers. But are those the only two alternatives? I suggest that Kant’s wrestling with the notion of divine grace can draw us all towards recognition of the ultimate mystery of human motivation and behaviour, and our need for forgiveness and hope.
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  3. David Collison, Stuart Cross, John Ferguson, David Power & Lorna Stevenson (2012). Legal Determinants of External Finance Revisited: The Inverse Relationship Between Investor Protection and Societal Well-Being. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):393-410.
    This article investigates relationships between countries' legal traditions and their quality of life as measured by a number of widely reported social indicators; in so doing it also offers a critique of a highly influential body of work which is widely cited in the literatures of corporate governance, economics and finance. That body of work has shown, inter alia, statistically significant relationships between legal traditions and various proxies for investor protection. We show statistically significant relationships between legal traditions and various (...)
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  4. Leslie Forster Stevenson (2012). Twelve Theories of Human Nature. Oxford University Press.
    Lucid and accessible, Twelve Theories of Human Nature compresses into a manageable space the essence of religious traditions such as Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, the Jewish Scriptures, the Christian New Testament, and Islam, as well as the philosophical theories of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Sartre, and the would-be scientific accounts of human nature by Marx, Freud, and Darwin and his successors.
     
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  5. John Ferguson, David Collison, David Power & Lorna Stevenson (2011). Accounting Education, Socialisation and the Ethics of Business. Business Ethics 20 (1):12-29.
    This study provides empirical evidence in relation to a growing body of literature concerned with the ‘socialisation’ effects of accounting and business education. A prevalent criticism within this literature is that accounting and business education in the United Kingdom and the United States, by assuming a ‘value-neutral’ appearance, ignores the implicit ethical and moral assumptions by which it is underpinned. In particular, it has been noted that accounting and business education tends to prioritise the interests of shareholders above all other (...)
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  6. Leslie Stevenson (2011). Objects of Representation. Diametros 27:4-24.
    I distinguish four questions within Kant's "problem of reality": (1) What constitutes propositional content? (2) What constitutes truth? (3) What constitutes referential content? (4) What constitutes successful singular reference? I argue that Kant's transcendental idealism applies primarily to (3) - understood as: What makes some mental or linguistic items would-be referential representations - and secondly to (1). But with regard to (4) and (2), we do not create the objects and states of affairs in the world (there are human artifacts, (...)
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  7. Leslie Forster Stevenson (2011). Inspirations From Kant: Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Objects of representation: Kant's Copernican revolution re-interpreted -- Synthetic unities of experience -- Three ways in which space and time might be said to be transcendentally ideal -- The given, the unconditioned, the transcendental object, and the reality of the past -- A theory of everything?: Kant speaks to Stephen Hawking -- Opinion, belief or faith, and knowledge -- Freedom of judgment in Descartes, Spinoza, Hume and Kant -- Six levels of mentality -- A Kantian defense of freewill.
     
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  8. Kara Schick Makaroff, Janet Storch, Lorelei Newton, Tom Fulton & Lynne Stevenson (2010). Dare We Speak of Ethics? Attending to the Unsayable Amongst Nurse Leaders. Nursing Ethics 17 (5):566-576.
    There is increasing emphasis on the need for collaboration between practice and academic leaders in health care research. However, many problems can arise owing to differences between academic and clinical goals and timelines. In order for research to move forward it is important to name and address these issues early in a project. In this article we use an example of a participatory action research study of ethical practice in nursing to highlight some of the issues that are not frequently (...)
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  9. Makaroff K. Schick, Janet Storch, Lorelei Newton, Tom Fulton & Lynne Stevenson (2010). Dare We Speak of Ethics? Attending to the Unsayable Amongst Nurse Leaders. Nursing Ethics 17 (5):566-576.
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  10. Leslie Stevenson (2009). Immortality Defended. Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):228-230.
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  11. Leslie Forster Stevenson (2009). Ten Theories of Human Nature. Oxford University Press.
    Over three previous editions, Ten Theories of Human Nature has been a remarkably popular introduction to some of the most influential developments in Western and Eastern thought. This thoroughly revised fourth edition features substantial new chapters on Aristotle and on evolutionary theories of human nature; the latter centers on Edward O. Wilson but also outlines the ideas of Emile Durkheim, B. F. Skinner, Nikolaas Tinbergen, Konrad Lorenz, Noam Chomsky, and recent evolutionary psychology. This edition also includes a rewritten introduction that (...)
     
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  12. Lynn Stevenson, Katarina Britz & Tertia Hörne (2008). KT and S4 Satisfiability in a Constraint Logic Environment. In Tu-Bao Ho & Zhi-Hua Zhou (eds.), Pricai 2008: Trends in Artificial Intelligence. Springer 370--381.
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  13. Leslie Stevenson (2004). Freedom of Judgement in Descartes, Hume, Spinoza and Kant. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):223 – 246.
    Is our judgement of the truth-value of propositions subject to the will? Do we have any voluntary control over the formation of our beliefs – and if so, how does it compare with the control we have over our actions? These questions lead into interestingly unclear philosophical and psychological territory which remains a focus of debate today. I will first examine the classic early modern discussions in Descartes, Spinoza and Hume. Then I will review some relevant themes in Kant, including (...)
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  14. L. Stevenson (2003). Opinion, Belief or Faith, and Knowledge. Kantian Review 7 (1):72-101.
    Kant famously said he 'had to deny knowledge in order to make room for faith ’ . But what exactly was his conception of Glaube, and how does it fit into his epistemology? In the first Critique it is not until the concluding Method section that he explicitly addresses these issues. In the Canon of Pure Reason he lists three questions that sum up ‘all interest of my reason’: What can I know? What should I do? What may I hope? (...)
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  15. Leslie F. Stevenson (2003). Twelve Conceptions of Imagination. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):238-59.
    The ability to think of something not presently perceived, but spatio-temporally real. (2) The ability to think of whatever one acknowledges as possible in the spatio-temporal world. (3) The liability to think of something that the subject believes to be real, but which is not. (4) The ability to think of things that one conceives of as fictional. (5) The ability to entertain mental images. (6) The ability to think of anything at all. (7) The non-rational operations of the mind, (...)
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  16. Leslie F. Stevenson (2002). Six Levels of Mentality. Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):105-124.
    Examination of recent debates about belief shows the need to distinguish: (a) non-linguistic informational states in animal perception; (b) the uncritical use of language, e.g. by children; (c) adult humans' reasoned judgments. If we also distinguish between mind-directed and object-directed mental states, we have: Perceptual 'beliefs' of animals and infants about their material environment. 'Beliefs' of animals and infants about the mental states of others. Linguistically-expressible beliefs about the world, resulting from e.g. the uncritical tendency to believe what we are (...)
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  17. Leslie Stevenson (2001). Human Freedom After Darwin: A Critical Rationalist View. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (4):795-799.
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  18. Leslie Stevenson (2001). Review of John Watkins 'Human Freedom After Darwin: A Critical Ratonalist View'. [REVIEW] British Journal of Philosophy of Science 52:795-99.
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  19. L. Stevenson (2000). Review. Possible Experience: Understanding Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. AW Collins. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (3):535-538.
  20. Leslie F. Stevenson (2000). Synthetic Unities of Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):281-306.
    Inspired by Kant, Merleau-Ponty and Sellars, I illustrate and identify certain kinds of unity which are typical (if not universal) features of our conscious experience, and argue that Kant was right to claim that such unities are produced by unconscious processes of synthesis: A perceptual experience of succession is not reducible to a succession of perceptual experiences. The experience of perceiving one object as having several features is not reducible to a conjunction of perceptual experiences of those features. A cross-modal (...)
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  21. Leslie Forster Stevenson (ed.) (2000). The Study of Human Nature: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    The second edition of this exceptional anthology provides an introduction to a wide variety of views on human nature. Drawing from diverse cultures over three millennia, Leslie Stevenson has chosen selections ranging from ancient religious texts to contemporary theories based on evolutionary science. An ideal companion to the editor's recent book, Ten Theories of Human Nature, 3/e (OUP, 1998), this interdisciplinary reader can also be used independently. The Study of Human Nature, 2/e offers substantial selections illustrating the ten perspectives discussed (...)
     
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  22. Simon Critchley, William R. Schroeder, Andrea Gentile, Mary Gregor, Norbert Hinske, Alvaro Lopez Fernandez, Rio Piedras, Leslie Stevenson & David L. Haberman (1999). Books Received. Kantian Review 3 (117):149.
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  23. Leslie Stevenson (1999). First Person Epistemology. Philosophy 74 (4):475-497.
    I argue that the distinction between first-person present and other-directed contexts of justification throws new light on epistemology. In particular, it has implications for the relations between justification, knowledge and truth, the debate between externalism and internalism, and the prospects for reflective equilibrium. I suggest that to focus on the third-person questions about knowledge or justification is to risk missing the main point of epistemology, namely to help us make reflective judgments about what to believe.
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  24. Leslie Stevenson (1999). Towards A General Theory Of Infelicities And Implications. Philosophical Inquiry 21 (1):45-60.
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  25. Leslie Stevenson (1999). The Arms Trade and the Slave Trade. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):85–94.
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  26. Leslie Stevenson (1998). Kant's Many Concepts of Appearance. Cogito 12 (3):181-186.
  27. Leslie Stevenson (1997). The Chance of a Singular Event? Philosophy 72 (280):312-16.
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  28. Leslie Stevenson & Henry Byerly (1997). The Many Faces of Science. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (188):404-405.
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  29. Leslie F. Stevenson (1995). Experiences in the Cave, the Closet and the Vat - and in Bed. Philosophy 70 (272):167 - 189.
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  30. Leslie F. Stevenson (1995). Experiences in the Cave, the Closet and the Vat—and in Bed: Leslie F. Stevenson. Philosophy 70 (272):167-189.
    The notion of experience plays a deeply ambiguous role in philosophical thinking. In ordinary discourse we say that applicants for employment as joiner, farmhand or nanny should have some previous experience with carpentry, livestock or children. Such uses of the word clearly presuppose the existence of the relevant objects of experience. In other usages the focus is more on the mental effect on the subject , as when someone says that they have had several unpleasant experiences that day–a wetting in (...)
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  31. Leslie Forster Stevenson & Henry Byerly (1995). The Many Faces of Science an Introduction to Scientists,Values, and Society. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  32. Leslie Stevenson (1994). External and Internal Private Language Arguments. Wittgenstein-Studien 1 (1).
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  33. Leslie Stevenson (1994). What Should Everyone Know About Science? Cogito 8 (2):183-186.
  34. Leslie Stevenson (1993). Unnatural Doubts: Epistemological Realism and the Basis of Scepticism By Michael Williams (Oxford: Blackwell 1991) Xxiii + 386pp., £40.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 68 (263):110-.
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  35. Leslie Stevenson (1993). Booknotes. Philosophy 68:113.
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  36. Leslie Stevenson (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 102 (407):534-535.
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  37. Leslie Stevenson (1993). Heidegger on Cartesian Scepticism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 1 (1):81 – 98.
  38. Leslie Stevenson (1993). In for a Penny. Philosophy 68:123.
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  39. Leslie Stevenson (1993). Kant's Theory of Self-Consciousness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (1):242-245.
  40. Leslie Stevenson (1993). Notebook. Philosophy 68:122.
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  41. Leslie Stevenson (1993). Why Believe What People Say? Synthese 94 (3):429 - 451.
    The basic alternatives seem to be either a Humean reductionist view that any particular assertion needs backing with inductive evidence for its reliability before it can retionally be believed, or a Reidian criterial view that testimony is intrinscially, though defeasibly, credible, in the absence of evidence against its reliability.Some recent arguments from the constraints on interpreting any linguistic performances as assertions with propositional content have some force against the reductionist view. We thus have reason to accept the criterial view, at (...)
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  42. Lois Stevenson (1990). Some Methodological Problems Associated with Researching Women Entrepreneurs. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (4-5):439 - 446.
    There is a need to feminize the research on entrepreneurs — to include the experiences of women in what we know to be true about entrepreneurs and the entrepreneurial process. This paper highlights some of the most significant methodological problems in researching women's entrepreneurial experience, problems which in the past, have prevented researchers from gaining an understanding of this experience, and which continues to stand in the way of developing female perspectives. Instead of using the existing male-based models, new approaches (...)
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  43. Leslie Stevenson (1989). "Existential Epistemology: A Heideggerian Critique of the Cartesian Project" by John Richardson. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (1):210.
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  44. Leslie Stevenson (1989). G. S. Kavka, "Moral Paradoxes of Nuclear Deterrence". [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 39 (55):250.
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  45. Leslie Stevenson (1989). Is Scientific Research Value-Neutral? Inquiry 32 (2):213 – 222.
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  46. Leslie Stevenson (1988). Can Truth Be Relativized to Kinds of Mind? Mind 97 (386):281-284.
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  47. Leslie Stevenson (1988). Defense Policies and the Evaluation of Risk. Social Theory and Practice 14 (2):215-234.
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  48. Leslie Stevenson (1988). John Richardson, "Existential Epistemology". [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 38 (52):383.
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  49. Leslie Stevenson (1988). Meaning, Assertion and Time. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (1):13 – 25.
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  50. L. Stevenson (1987). M. G. Dickson, "Understanding Kant's Critique". [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 37 (48):338.
     
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