Search results for 'LONG-TERM-MEMORY' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daniel S. Ruchkin, Jordan Grafman, Katherine Cameron & Rita S. Berndt (2003). Working Memory Retention Systems: A State of Activated Long-Term Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):709-728.score: 180.0
    High temporal resolution event-related brain potential and electroencephalographic coherence studies of the neural substrate of short-term storage in working memory indicate that the sustained coactivation of both prefrontal cortex and the posterior cortical systems that participate in the initial perception and comprehension of the retained information are involved in its storage. These studies further show that short-term storage mechanisms involve an increase in neural synchrony between prefrontal cortex and posterior cortex and the enhanced activation of long-term memory representations of material (...)
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  2. Simon Hanslmayr, Tobias Staudigl & Marie-Christin Fellner (2012). Oscillatory Power Decreases and Long-Term Memory: The Information Via Desynchronization Hypothesis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 180.0
    The traditional belief is that brain oscillations are important for human long-term memory, because they induce synchronized firing between cell assemblies which shapes synaptic plasticity. Therefore, most prior studies focused on the role of synchronization for episodic memory, as reflected in theta (~5 Hz) and gamma (>40 Hz) power increases. These studies, however, neglect the role that is played by neural desynchronization, which is usually reflected in power decreases in the alpha and beta frequency band (8-30 Hz). In this paper (...)
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  3. Terry Whatson Paul Kelley (2013). Making Long-Term Memories in Minutes: A Spaced Learning Pattern From Memory Research in Education. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 178.0
    Memory systems select from environmental stimuli those to encode permanently. Repeated stimuli separated by timed spaces without stimuli can initiate Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) and long-term memory (LTM) encoding. These processes occur in time scales of minutes, and has been demonstrated in many species. This study reports on using a specific timed pattern of three repeated stimuli separated by ten-minute spaces drawn from both behavioural and laboratory studies of LTP and LTM encoding. A technique was developed based on this pattern to (...)
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  4. Anthony G. Greenwald, R. L. Abrams, Lionel Naccache & Stanislas Dehaene (2003). Long-Term Semantic Memory Versus Contextual Memory in Unconscious Number Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):235-247.score: 176.0
    Subjects classified visible 2-digit numbers as larger or smaller than 55. Target numbers were preceded by masked 2-digit primes that were either congruent (same relation to 55) or incongruent. Experiments 1 and 2 showed prime congruency effects for stimuli never included in the set of classified visible targets, indicating subliminal priming based on long-term semantic memory. Experiments 2 and 3 went further to demonstrate paradoxical unconscious priming effects resulting from task context. For example, after repeated practice classifying 73 as larger (...)
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  5. Bill Faw (2003). Pre-Frontal Executive Committee for Perception, Working Memory, Attention, Long-Term Memory, Motor Control, and Thinking: A Tutorial Review. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):83-139.score: 150.0
  6. Trygg Engen & Bruce M. Ross (1973). Long-Term Memory of Odors with and Without Verbal Descriptions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (2):221.score: 150.0
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  7. Edward A. Bilodeau, Marshall B. Jones & C. Michael Levy (1964). Long-Term Memory as a Function of Retention Time and Repeated Recalling. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (4):303.score: 150.0
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  8. Lee Elliott (1973). Imagery Versus Repetition Encoding in Short- and Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (2):270.score: 150.0
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  9. Ira Fischler & James F. Juola (1971). Effects of Repeated Tests on Recognition Time for Information in Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):54.score: 150.0
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  10. Anthony F. Grasha, Donald A. Schumsky & Lee A. Elliott (1973). Relationships Among Short-Term Recall, Intralist Intrusions, Subjective Certainty Ratings, and Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):83.score: 150.0
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  11. D. J. Herrmann & John P. McLaughlin (1973). Effects of Experimental and Preexperimental Organization on Recognition: Evidence for Two Storage Systems in Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (2):174.score: 150.0
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  12. Vito Modigliani & John G. Seamon (1974). Transfer of Information From Short- to Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (5):768.score: 150.0
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  13. Thomas O. Nelson & Robert Rothbart (1972). Acoustic Savings for Items Forgotten From Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):357.score: 150.0
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  14. Larry M. Raskin (1969). Long-Term Memory Effects in the Perception of Apparent Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1p1):97.score: 150.0
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  15. C. James Scheirer & Michael J. Hanley (1974). Scanning for Similar and Different Material in Short- and Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (2):343.score: 150.0
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  16. Paul M. Wortman & Phillip B. Sparling (1974). Acquisition and Retention of Mnemonic Information in Long-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (1):22.score: 150.0
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  17. Henry C. Ellis & Terry C. Daniel (1971). Verbal Processes in Long-Term Stimulus-Recognition Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (1):18.score: 145.0
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  18. Richard C. Mohs & Richard C. Atkinson (1974). Recognition Time for Words in Short-Term, Long-Term or Both Memory Stores. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (5):830.score: 145.0
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  19. Keith T. Wescourt & Richard C. Atkinson (1973). Scanning for Information in Long- and Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):95.score: 145.0
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  20. Philippe Peigneux Alison Mary, Svenia Schreiner (2013). Accelerated Long-Term Forgetting in Aging and Intra-Sleep Awakenings. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 130.0
    The architecture of sleep and the functional neuroanatomical networks subtending memory consolidation processes are both modified with aging, possibly leading to accelerated forgetting in long-term memory. We investigated associative learning and declarative memory consolidation processes in 16 young (18–30 years) and 16 older (65–75 years) healthy adults. Performance was tested using a cued recall procedure at the end of learning (immediate recall), and 30 minutes and 7 days later. A delayed recognition test was also administered on day 7. Daily sleep (...)
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  21. Stan Klein (2013). Making the Case That Episodic Recollection is Attributable to Operations Occurring at Retrieval Rather Than to Content Stored in a Dedicated Subsystem of Long-Term Memory. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 7 (3):1-14.score: 126.0
    Episodic memory often is conceptualized as a uniquely human system of long-term memory that makes available knowledge accompanied by the temporal and spatial context in which that knowledge was acquired. Retrieval from episodic memory entails a form of first–person subjectivity called autonoetic consciousness that provides a sense that a recollection was something that took place in the experiencer’s personal past. In this paper I expand on this definition of episodic memory. Specifically, I suggest that (a) the core features assumed unique (...)
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  22. Hermann J. Müller Markus Conci, Martina Zellin (2012). Whatever After Next? Adaptive Predictions Based on Short- and Long-Term Memory in Visual Search. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 126.0
    Whatever after Next? Adaptive Predictions Based on Short- and Long-Term Memory in Visual Search.
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  23. Joaquín M. Fuster (2003). More Than Working Memory Rides on Long-Term Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):737-737.score: 120.0
    Single-unit data from the cortex of monkeys performing working-memory tasks support the main point of the target article. Those data, however, also indicate that the activation of long-term memory is essential to the processing of all cognitive functions. The activation of cortical long-term memory networks is a key neural mechanism in attention (working memory is a form thereof), perception, memory acquisition and retrieval, intelligence, and language.
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  24. Robert H. Logie & Sergio Della Sala (2003). Working Memory as a Mental Workspace: Why Activated Long-Term Memory is Not Enough. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):745-746.score: 120.0
    Working-memory retention as activated long-term memory fails to capture orchestrated processing and storage, the hallmark of the concept of working memory. The event-related potential (ERP) data are compatible with working memory as a mental workspace that holds and manipulates information on line, which is distinct from long-term memory, and deals with the products of activated traces from stored knowledge.
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  25. Jennifer D. Ryan & Neal J. Cohen (2003). The Contribution of Long-Term Memory and the Role of Frontal-Lobe Systems in on-Line Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):756-756.score: 120.0
    Ruchkin et al. ascribe a pivotal role to long-term memory representations and binding within working memory. Here we focus on the interaction of working memory and long-term memory in supporting on-line representations of experience available to guide on-going processing, and we distinguish the role of frontal-lobe systems from what the hippocampus contributes to relational long-term memory binding.
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  26. Stephen Grossberg (2003). From Working Memory to Long-Term Memory and Back: Linked but Distinct. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):737-738.score: 120.0
    Neural models have proposed how short-term memory (STM) storage in working memory and long-term memory (LTM) storage and recall are linked and interact, but are realized by different mechanisms that obey different laws. The authors' data can be understood in the light of these models, which suggest that the authors may have gone too far in obscuring the differences between these processes.
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  27. James S. Nairne & Ian Neath (2001). Long-Term Memory Span. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):134-135.score: 120.0
    Cowan assumes that chunk-based capacity limits are synonymous with the essence of a “specialized STM mechanism.” In a single experiment, we measured the capacity, or span, of long-term memory and found that it, too, corresponds roughly to the magical number 4. The results imply that a chunk-based capacity limit is not a signature characteristic of remembering over the short-term.
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  28. Sergio Morra (2003). Developmental Evidence for Working Memory as Activated Long-Term Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):750-750.score: 120.0
    There is remarkable agreement between Ruchkin et al.'s psychophysiological views and my own model, based on developmental-experimental evidence, of working memory as activated long-term memory (LTM). I construe subvocal rehearsal as an operative scheme that maintains order information and demands attentional resources. Encoding and retrieving operations also demand attention. Another share of resources is used for keeping activated specific LTM representations.
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  29. Wolfgang Klimesch & Bärbel Schack (2003). Activation of Long-Term Memory by Alpha Oscillations in a Working-Memory Task? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):743-743.score: 120.0
    We focus on the functional specificity of theta and alpha oscillations and show that theta is related to working memory, whereas alpha is related to semantic long-term memory. Recent studies, however, indicate that alpha oscillations also play an important role during short-term memory retention and retrieval. This latter finding provides support for the basic hypothesis suggested by Ruchkin et al.
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  30. Giuseppe Vallar (2003). The Short-Term/Long-Term Memory Distinction: Back to the Past? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):757-758.score: 120.0
    The view that short-term memory should be conceived of as being a process based on the activation of long-term memory is inconsistent with neuropsychological evidence. Data from brain-damaged patients, showing specific patterns of impairment, are compatible with a vision of memory as a multiple-component system, whose different aspects, in neurologically unimpaired subjects, show a high degree of interaction.
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  31. Frank Rösler & Martin Heil (2003). Working Memory as a State of Activated Long-Term Memory: A Plausible Theory, but Other Data Provide More Compelling Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):754-755.score: 120.0
    The identity of working-memory and long-term memory representations follows from many lines of evidence. However, the data provided by Ruchkin et al. are hardly compelling, as they make unproved assumptions about hypothetical generators. We cite studies from our lab in which congruent slow-wave topographies were found for short-term and long-term memory tasks, strongly suggesting that both activate identical cell assemblies.
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  32. Steve Majerus, Martial Van der Linden, Fabienne Collette & Eric Salmon (2003). Does Sustained ERP Activity in Posterior Lexico-Semantic Processing Areas During Short-Term Memory Tasks Only Reflect Activated Long-Term Memory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):746-747.score: 120.0
    We challenge Ruchkin et al.'s claim in reducing short-term memory (STM) to the active part of long-term memory (LTM), by showing that their data cannot rule out the possibility that activation of posterior brain regions could also reflect the contribution of a verbal STM buffer.
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  33. S. Dehaene, A. G. Greenwald, R. L. Abrams & L. Naccache (2003). Long-Term Semantic Memory Versus Contextual Memory in Unconscious Number Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):235-247.score: 116.0
    Subjects classified visible 2-digit numbers as larger or smaller than 55. Target numbers were preceded by masked 2-digit primes that were either congruent (same relation to 55) or incongruent. Experiments 1 and 2 showed prime congruency effects for stimuli never included in the set of classified visible targets, indicating subliminal priming based on long-term semantic memory. Experiments 2 and 3 went further to demonstrate paradoxical unconscious priming effects resulting from task context. For example, after repeated practice classifying 73 as larger (...)
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  34. Derek Evan Nee & John Jonides (2013). Trisecting Representational States in Short-Term Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 102.0
  35. Nelson Cowan (2001). The Magical Number 4 in Short-Term Memory: A Reconsideration of Mental Storage Capacity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):87-114.score: 100.0
    Miller (1956) summarized evidence that people can remember about seven chunks in short-term memory (STM) tasks. However, that number was meant more as a rough estimate and a rhetorical device than as a real capacity limit. Others have since suggested that there is a more precise capacity limit, but that it is only three to five chunks. The present target article brings together a wide variety of data on capacity limits suggesting that the smaller capacity limit is real. Capacity limits (...)
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  36. Mary C. Potter (2012). Conceptual Short Term Memory in Perception and Thought. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 100.0
    Conceptual short term memory (CSTM) is a theoretical construct that provides one answer to the question of how perceptual and conceptual processes are related. CSTM is a mental buffer and processor in which current perceptual stimuli and their associated concepts from long term memory (LTM) are represented briefly, allowing meaningful patterns or structures to be identified (Potter, 1993, 1999, 2009). CSTM is different from and complementary to other proposed forms of working memory: it is engaged extremely rapidly, has a large (...)
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  37. Frank Restle (1970). Training of Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (2p1):224.score: 100.0
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  38. Richard M. Shiffrin (1973). Information Persistence in Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):39.score: 100.0
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  39. Amedeo D'Angiulli, Matthew Runge, Andrew Faulkner, Jila Zakizadeh, Aldrich Chan & Selvana Morcos (2013). Vividness of Visual Imagery and Incidental Recall of Verbal Cues, When Phenomenological Availability Reflects Long-Term Memory Accessibility. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 96.0
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  40. Jonathan K. Foster (2003). Thoughts From the Long-Term Memory Chair. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):734-735.score: 93.0
    With reference to Ruchkins et al.'s framework, this commentary briefly considers the history of working memory, and whether, heuristically, this is a useful concept. A neuropsychologically motivated critique is offered, specifically with regard to the recent trend for working-memory researchers to conceptualise this capacity more as a process than as a set of distinct task-specific stores.
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  41. John Sweller (1998). Can We Measure Working Memory Without Contamination From Knowledge Held in Long-Term Memory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):845-846.score: 93.0
    The metric devised by Halford, Wilson & Phillips may have considerable potential in distinguishing between the working memory demands of different tasks but may be less effective in distinguishing working memory capacity between individuals. Despite the strengths of the metric, determining whether an effect is caused by relational complexity or by differential levels of expertise is currently problematic.
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  42. Terry C. Daniel & Henry C. Ellis (1972). Stimulus Codability and Long-Term Recognition Memory for Visual Form. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):83.score: 93.0
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  43. Jaap Mj Murre, Gezinus Wolters & Antonino Raffone (2006). Binding in Working Memory and Long-Term Memory: Towards an Integrated Model. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oup Oxford.score: 93.0
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  44. Jaap Murre, Gezinus Wolters & Raffone & Antonio (2006). The Memory Chain Model of Learning, Forgetting and Disorders of Long-Term Memory. In Hubert Zimmer, Axel Mecklinger & Ulman Lindenberger (eds.), Handbook of Binding and Memory: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oup Oxford.score: 93.0
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  45. Bradley R. Postle (2007). Activated Long-Term Memory? The Bases of Representation in Working Memory. In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. Oup Oxford. 333--349.score: 93.0
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  46. Klaus G. Reymann (1997). As in Long-Term Memory, LTP is Consolidated by Reinforcers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):627-628.score: 93.0
    Recent evidence from our lab indicates that LTP shares an important property with memory consolidation: it is consolidated by natural reinforcement. Nevertheless, the hypothesis, that LTP-like mechanisms or other forms of enhanced synaptic efficacy are basic elements in learning is not unequivocally supported. Skepticism aside, LTP is an accessible experimental model that is optimally equipped for the investigation of the cellular and molecular machinery involved in synaptic weight changes.
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  47. Janez Bregant, Andraž Stožer & Marko Cerkvenik (2010). Molecular Reduction: Reality or Fiction? [REVIEW] Synthese 172 (3):437 - 450.score: 90.0
    Neurophysiological research suggests our mental life is related to the cellular processes of particular nerves. In the spirit of Occam’s razor, some authors take these connections as reductions of psychological terms and kinds to molecular- biological mechanisms and patterns. Bickle’s ‘intervene cellularly/molecularly and track behaviourally’ reduction is one example of this. Here the mental is being reduced to the physical in two steps. The first is, through genetically altered mammals, to causally alter activity of particular nerve cells, i.e. neurons, at (...)
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  48. Nick Bostrom, Cortical Integration: Possible Solutions to the Binding and Linking Problems in Perception, Reasoning and Long Term Memory.score: 90.0
    The problem of cortical integration is described and various proposed solutions, including grandmother cells, cell assemblies, feed-forward structures, RAAM and synchronization, are reviewed. One method, involving complex attractors, that has received little attention in the literature, is explained and developed. I call this binding through annexation. A simulation study is then presented which suggests ways in which complex attractors could underlie our capacity to reason. The paper ends with a discussion of the efficiency and biological plausibility of the proposals as (...)
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  49. L. Cahill (2004). The Influence of Sex Versus Sex-Related Traits on Long-Term Memory for Gist and Detail From an Emotional Story. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):391-400.score: 90.0
  50. William F. Brewer & John R. Pani (1996). Reports of Mental Imagery in Retrieval From Long-Term Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):265-287.score: 90.0
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