Search results for 'Landscape assessment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Office of Technology Assessment (1982). An Assessment of Alternatives for a National Computerized Criminal History System. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 12 (3):14-25.score: 180.0
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  2. Allen Carlson (2009). Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics. Columbia University Press.score: 96.0
    The development and nature of environmental aesthetics -- Aesthetic appreciation and the natural environment -- The requirements for an adequate aesthetics of nature -- Aesthetic appreciation and the human environment -- Appreciation of the human environment under different conceptions -- Aesthetic appreciation and the agricultural landscape -- What is the correct way to aesthetically appreciate landscapes?
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  3. Kate Flint & Howard Morphy (eds.) (2000). Culture, Landscape, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    The contributors to this volume move through time and space--from prehistoric Europe to the Enlightenment, and from industrial Victorian England to Aboriginal Australia--to compare the ways in which the environment is constructed in different ways across cultures.
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  4. Robert Mugerauer (1995). Interpreting Environments: Tradition, Deconstruction, Hermeneutics. University of Texas Press.score: 66.0
    Mugerauer seeks to make deconstruction and hermeneutics accessible to people in the environmental disciplines, including architecture, planning, urban studies, environmental studies, and cultural geography. Mugerauer demonstrates each methodology through a case study. The first study uses the traditional approach to recover the meaning of Jung's and Wittgenstein's houses by analyzing their historical, intentional contexts. The second case study utilizes deconstruction to explore Egyptian, French neoclassical, and postmodern attempts to use pyramids to constitute a sense of lasting presence. And the third (...)
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  5. S. James & David Ley (eds.) (1993). Place/Culture/Representation. Routledge.score: 60.0
     
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  6. Brett Calcott (2008). Assessing the Fitness Landscape Revolution. Biology and Philosophy 23 (5):639-657.score: 58.0
    According to Pigliucci and Kaplan, there is a revolution underway in how we understand fitness landscapes. Recent models suggest that a perennial problem in these landscapes—how to get from one peak across a fitness valley to another peak—is, in fact, non-existent. In this paper I assess the structure and the extent of Pigliucci and Kaplan’s proposed revolution and argue for two points. First, I provide an alternative interpretation of what underwrites this revolution, motivated by some recent work on model-based science. (...)
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  7. Val Plumwood (2006). The Concept of a Cultural Landscape: Nature, Culture and Agency of the Land. Ethics and the Environment 11 (2):115-150.score: 54.0
    : The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Report issued in April 2005 shows how severely our civilisation is degrading and overstressing the natural systems that support human life and all other lives on earth. An important critical challenge, especially for the eco-humanities, is to help us understand the conceptual frameworks and systems that disappear the crucial support provided by natural systems and prevent us from seeing nature as a field of agency. This paper considers the currently popular concept of a cultural (...)
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  8. Maartje de Visser (2013). National Constitutional Courts, the Court of Justice and the Protection of Fundamental Rights in a Post-Charter Landscape. Human Rights Review 15 (1):1-13.score: 54.0
    This article critically evaluates the possible impact of the Charter on the relationship between the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and national constitutional courts. While it is premature to provide a definitive assessment of the kind of collaboration that these courts will develop, it is crucial to identify a number of features of the new landscape that will influence the direction in which the relationship between the CJEU and constitutional courts will evolve. This article discusses (...)
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  9. Margaret L. Margosian, Karen A. Garrett, J. M. Shawn Hutchinson & Kimberly A. With (2009). Connectivity of the American Agricultural Landscape: Assessing the National Risk of Crop Pest and Disease Spread. Bioscience 59 (2):141-151.score: 50.0
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  10. Margaret L. Margosian, Karen A. Garrett & Jm Shawn Hutchinson (2009). Connectivity of the American Agricultural Landscape: Assessing the National Risk of Crop Pest and Disease Spread. Bioscience 59 (2):141-151.score: 50.0
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  11. Lisa A. Eckenwiler & Felicia Cohn (eds.) (2007). The Ethics of Bioethics: Mapping the Moral Landscape. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 30.0
    Stem cell research. Drug company influence. Abortion. Contraception. Long-term and end-of-life care. Human participants research. Informed consent. The list of ethical issues in science, medicine, and public health is long and continually growing. These complex issues pose a daunting task for professionals in the expanding field of bioethics. But what of the practice of bioethics itself? What issues do ethicists and bioethicists confront in their efforts to facilitate sound moral reasoning and judgment in a variety of venues? Are those immersed (...)
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  12. Paul Faulstich (1998). Mapping the Mythological Landscape: An Aboriginal Way of Being-in-the- World. Philosophy and Geography 1 (2):197 – 221.score: 30.0
    Warlpiri Aborigines utilize graphic and cognitive systems to represent their connections to landscape. The Dreaming is the primary mechanism through which Warlpiri organize and understand the significance of places. Each Dreaming myth has an accompanying graphic map, which references incidents and places associated with Ancestors. The maps recount sites along Dreaming tracks, and provide assessments of resources. Warlpiri create these coded images to coordinate physiographic and mythical components of the landscape. They structure knowledge about the world and facilitate (...)
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  13. Jacob Stegenga (forthcoming). Herding QATs: Quality Assessment Tools for Evidence in Medicine. In Huneman, Silberstein & Lambert (eds.), Herding QATs: Quality Assessment Tools for Evidence in Medicine.score: 27.0
    Medical scientists employ ‘quality assessment tools’ (QATs) to measure the quality of evidence from clinical studies, especially randomized controlled trials (RCTs). These tools are designed to take into account various methodological details of clinical studies, including randomization, blinding, and other features of studies deemed relevant to minimizing bias and error. There are now dozens available. The various QATs on offer differ widely from each other, and second-order empirical studies show that QATs have low inter-rater reliability and low inter-tool reliability. (...)
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  14. Martin Drenthen (2011). 'Reading Ourselves Through the Land: Landscape Hermeneutics and Ethics of Place. In Forrest Clingerman Clingerman & Mark Dixon (eds.), 'Reading ourselves through the land: landscape hermeneutics and ethics of place', in: F. Clingerman & M. Dixon (Eds.): Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy, and Ethics. Ashgate.score: 27.0
    In this text, I discuss the environmental education project "Legible Landscape", which aims to teach inhabitants to read their landscape and develop a closer, more engaged relationship to place. I show that the project's semiotic perspective on landscape legibility tends to hamper the understanding of the moral dimension of reading landscapes, and argue that a hermeneutical perspective is better suited to acknowledge the way that readers and texts are intimately connected.
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  15. Erich Schienke, Seth Baum, Nancy Tuana, Kenneth Davis & Klaus Keller (2011). Intrinsic Ethics Regarding Integrated Assessment Models for Climate Management. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):503-523.score: 24.0
    In this essay we develop and argue for the adoption of a more comprehensive model of research ethics than is included within current conceptions of responsible conduct of research (RCR). We argue that our model, which we label the ethical dimensions of scientific research (EDSR), is a more comprehensive approach to encouraging ethically responsible scientific research compared to the currently typically adopted approach in RCR training. This essay focuses on developing a pedagogical approach that enables scientists to better understand and (...)
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  16. David Wright (2011). A Framework for the Ethical Impact Assessment of Information Technology. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):199-226.score: 24.0
    This paper proposes a framework for an ethical impact assessment which can be performed in regard to any policy, service, project or programme involving information technology. The framework is structured on the four principles posited by Beauchamp and Childress together with a separate section on privacy and data protection. The framework identifies key social values and ethical issues, provides some brief explanatory contextual information which is then followed by a set of questions aimed at the technology developer or policy-maker (...)
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  17. Peter Railton (forthcoming). The Affective Dog and its Rational Tale. Ethics.score: 24.0
    Intuition—spontaneous, nondeliberative assessment—has long been indispensable in theoretical and practical philosophy alike. Recent research by psychologists and experimental philosophers has challenged our understanding of the nature and authority of moral intuitions by tracing them to “fast,” “automatic,” “button-pushing” responses of the affective system. This view of the affective system contrasts with a growing body of research in affective neuroscience which suggests that it is instead a flexible learning system that generates and updates a multidimensional evaluative landscape to guide (...)
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  18. Soemini Kasanmoentalib (1996). Science and Values in Risk Assessment: The Case of Deliberate Release of Genetically Engineered Organisms. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (1):42-60.score: 24.0
    To make more responsible decisions regarding risk and to understand disagreements and controversies in risk assessments, it is important to know how and where values are infused into risk assessment and how they are embedded in the conclusions. In this article an attempt is made to disentangle the relationship of science and values in decision-making concerning the deliberate release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the environment. This exercise in applied philosophy of science is based on Helen Longino's contextual (...)
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  19. Franz Huber (2007). The Logic of Theory Assessment. Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (5):511-538.score: 24.0
    This paper starts by indicating the analysis of Hempel's conditions of adequacy for any relation of confirmation (Hempel, 1945) as presented in Huber (submitted). There I argue contra Carnap (1962, Section 87) that Hempel felt the need for two concepts of confirmation: one aiming at plausible theories and another aiming at informative theories. However, he also realized that these two concepts are conflicting, and he gave up the concept of confirmation aiming at informative theories. The main part of the paper (...)
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  20. Salim Kemal & Ivan Gaskell (eds.) (1993). Landscape, Natural Beauty, and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    In Landscape, Natural Beauty, and the Arts, a distinguished group of scholars probes the complex structure of aesthetic responses to nature. Each of the chapters refines and expands the terms of discussion, and together they enrich the debate with insights from art history, literary criticism, geography and philosophy. To explore the interrelation between our conceptions of nature, beauty and art, the contributors consider the social construction of nature, the determination of our appreciation by artistic media, and the duality of (...)
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  21. Lee Smolin (2013). A Perspective on the Landscape Problem. Foundations of Physics 43 (1):21-45.score: 24.0
    I discuss the historical roots of the landscape problem and propose criteria for its successful resolution. This provides a perspective to evaluate the possibility to solve it in several of the speculative cosmological scenarios under study including eternal inflation, cosmological natural selection and cyclic cosmologies.Invited contribution for a special issue of Foundations of Physics titled Forty Years Of String Theory: Reflecting On the Foundations.
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  22. Caroline Gauthier (2005). Measuring Corporate Social and Environmental Performance: The Extended Life-Cycle Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):199 - 206.score: 24.0
    This papers attempts to bridge business ethics to corporate social responsibility including the social and environmental dimensions. The objective of the paper is to suggest an improvement of the most commonly used corporate environmental management tool, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The method includes two stages. First, more phases are added to the life-cycle of a product. Second, social criteria that measure the social performance of a product are introduced. An application of this “extended” LCA tool is given.
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  23. E. Ann Clark & Hugh Lehman (2001). Assessment of GM Crops in Commercial Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):3-28.score: 24.0
    The caliber of recent discourse regarding geneticallymodified organisms (GMOs) has suffered from a lack of consensuson terminology, from the scarcity of evidence upon which toassess risk to health and to the environment, and from valuedifferences between proponents and opponents of GMOs. Towardsaddressing these issues, we present the thesis that GM should bedefined as the forcible insertion of DNA into a host genome,irrespective of the source of the DNA, and exclusive ofconventional or mutation breeding.Some defenders of the commercial use of GMOs (...)
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  24. Barbara Crossouard & John Pryor (2012). How Theory Matters: Formative Assessment Theory and Practices and Their Different Relations to Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):251-263.score: 24.0
    The positioning of theory in relation to educational practice has provoked much recent debate, with some arguing that educational theory constrains thinking in education, while others dismiss ‘theory’ out of hand as belonging to the world of the ‘academic’, abstracted from the ‘realities’ of the classroom. This paper views theory as necessarily implicated in all practices, but argues that depending on the theories embraced, and the understanding of theory itself, education can be understood in very different ways. Resisting the separation (...)
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  25. Maddalena Taras (2005). Assessment: Summative and Formative: Some Theoretical Reflections. British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (4):466 - 478.score: 24.0
    This paper wishes to clarify the definitions of the central terms relating to assessment. It argues that all assessment begins with summative assessment (which is a judgement) and that formative assessment is in fact summative assessment plus feedback which is used by the learner.
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  26. Jan Baedke (2013). The Epigenetic Landscape in the Course of Time: Conrad Hal Waddington's Methodological Impact on the Life Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):756-773.score: 24.0
    It seems that the reception of Conrad Hal Waddington’s work never really gathered speed in mainstream biology. This paper, offering a transdisciplinary survey of approaches using his epigenetic landscape images, argues that (i) Waddington’s legacy is much broader than is usually recognized—it is widespread across the life sciences (e.g. stem cell biology, developmental psychology and cultural anthropology). In addition, I will show that (ii) there exist as yet unrecognized heuristic roles, especially in model building and theory formation, which Waddington’s (...)
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  27. Anya Plutynski (2008). The Rise and Fall of the Adaptive Landscape? Biology and Philosophy 23 (5):605-623.score: 24.0
    The discussion of the adaptive landscape in the philosophical literature appears to be divided along the following lines. On the one hand, some claim that the adaptive landscape is either “uninterpretable” or incoherent. On the other hand, some argue that the adaptive landscape has been an important heuristic, or tool in the service of explaining, as well as proposing and testing hypotheses about evolutionary change. This paper attempts to reconcile these two views.
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  28. Kevin Possin (2013). A Serious Flaw in the Collegiate Learning Assessment [CLA] Test. Informal Logic 33 (3):390-405.score: 24.0
    The Collegiate Learning Assessment Test (CLA) has become popular and highly recommended, praised for its reliability and validity. I argue that while the CLA may be a commendable test for measuring critical-thinking, problem-solving, and logical-reasoning skills, those who are scoring students’ answers to the test’s questions are rendering the CLA invalid.
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  29. Nick Peim & Kevin J. Flint (2009). Testing Times: Questions Concerning Assessment for School Improvement. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (3):342-361.score: 24.0
    Contemporary education now appears to be dominated by the continual drive for improvement measured against the assessment of what students have learned. It is our contention that a foundational relation with assessment organises contemporary education. Here we draw on a 'way of thinking' that is deconstructive in its intent. Such thinking makes clear the vicious circularity of the argument for improvement, wherein assessment valorised in discourses of improvement provides not only a rationalisation for improvement via assessment, (...)
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  30. Paul Shepard (1967). Man in the Landscape. New York, Knopf; [Distributed by Random House].score: 24.0
    "Man in the Landscape" was among the first books of a new genre that has elucidated the ideas, beliefs, and images that lie behind our modern destruction and ...
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  31. Robert E. Abrams (2004). Landscape and Ideology in American Renaissance Literature: Topographies of Skepticism. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Robert Abrams argues that new concepts of space and landscape emerged in mid-nineteenth-century American writing, marking a linguistic and interpretative limit to American expansion. Abrams supports the radical elements of antebellum writing, where writers from Hawthorne to Rebecca Harding Davis disputed the naturalizing discourses of mid-nineteenth century society. Whereas previous critics find in antebellum writing a desire to convert chaos into an affirmative, liberal agenda, Abrams contends that authors of the 1840s and 50s deconstructed more than they constructed.
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  32. Gordon Stobart (2001). The Validity of National Curriculum Assessment. British Journal of Educational Studies 49 (1):26 - 39.score: 24.0
    This paper reviews the validity of National Curriculum assessment in England. It works with the concept of 'consequential validity' (Messick, 1989) which incorporates both conventional 'reliability' issues and the use to which any assessment is put. The review uses the eight stage 'threats to validity' model developed by Crooks, Kane and Cohen (1996). The complexity of National Curriculum assessment makes evaluation difficult. These assessments are used for a variety of purposes so that the 'consequential' aspects are compounded. (...)
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  33. Eva Van Den Bussche, Astrid Vermeiren, Kobe Desender, Wim Gevers, Gethin Hughes, Tom Verguts & Bert Reynvoet (2013). Disentangling Conscious and Unconscious Processing: A Subjective Trial-Based Assessment Approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    The most common method for assessing similarities and differences between conscious and unconscious processing is to compare the effects of unconscious (perceptually weak) stimuli, with conscious (perceptually strong) stimuli. Awareness of these stimuli is then assessed by objective performance on prime identification tasks. While this approach has proven extremely fruitful in furthering our understanding of unconscious cognition, it also suffers from some critical problems. We present an alternative methodology for comparing conscious and unconscious cognition. We used a priming version of (...)
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  34. Philippe Deuffic & Jacqueline Candau (2006). Farming and Landscape Management: How French Farmers Are Coping with the Ecologization of Their Activities. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):563-585.score: 24.0
    In Europe, an increasing share of public subsidies for food production is being transferred towards the production of goods and environmental services. Today, farmers hesitate between the quest for technical and economic performance, which has been the paradigm of their professional activities since the 1960s, on one hand, and taking account of the environmental concerns that have been imposed since the middle of the 80s, on the other. Is it possible for farmers to continue to work according to the paradigm (...)
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  35. John Forrer (2009). Locating Peace Through Commerce in Good Global Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):449 - 460.score: 24.0
    Peace Through Commerce (PTC) is expanding its influence on the formulation of business strategies for responding to challenges found in conflict and post-conflict zones. A review of practical guidance available on successful PTC business practices shows it is more general than particular and short on detailed recommendations. In addition, such recommendations say little about how globalization is transforming the forms and processes of global governance and their implications for PTC strategies. An assessment of the changing landscape of global (...)
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  36. Peter A. D. Beets (2012). Strengthening Morality and Ethics in Educational Assessment Through Ubuntu in South Africa. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s2):68-83.score: 24.0
    While assessment is regarded as integral to enhancing the quality of teaching and learning, it is also a practice fraught with moral and ethical issues. An analysis is made of current assessment practices of teachers in South Africa which seem to straddle the domains of accountability and professional codes of conduct. In the process the position of the teacher as mediator between policies and diverse learner needs is explored in the light of moral and ethical considerations. Based on (...)
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  37. Bjørn Hofmann (2005). On Value-Judgements and Ethics in Health Technology Assessment. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):277-295.score: 24.0
    The widespread application of technology in health care has imposed a broad range of challenges. The field of health technology assessment (HTA) is developed in order to face some of these challenges. However, this strategy has not been as successful as one could hope. One of the reasons for this is that social and ethical considerations have not been integrated in the HTA process. Nowadays however, such considerations have been included in many HTAs. Still, the conclusions and recommendations of (...)
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  38. Lorraine Y. Landry (1999). Multi-Disciplinary Competence Assessment: A Case Study in Consensus and Culture. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (5):423-437.score: 24.0
    The case of May Redwing, an American Indian woman assessed for competence is examined in detail. The case highlights the interconnections between the cultures of medicine and law and notes the importance of criteria of competence assessment, but also underscores the necessity of attention to the patient'scultural background in a multi-disciplinary competence assessment team process. Three interrelated areas of inquiry are explored: (1) Can we expect a morally and politically justifiable assessment of competence from a multi-disciplinary approach? (...)
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  39. Nathan Carlin, Cathy Rozmus, Jeffrey Spike, Irmgard Willcockson, William Seifert, Cynthia Chappell, Pei-Hsuan Hsieh, Thomas Cole, Catherine Flaitz, Joan Engebretson, Rebecca Lunstroth, Charles Amos & Bryant Boutwell (2011). The Health Professional Ethics Rubric: Practical Assessment in Ethics Education for Health Professional Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):277-290.score: 24.0
    A barrier to the development and refinement of ethics education in and across health professional schools is that there is not an agreed upon instrument or method for assessment in ethics education. The most widely used ethics education assessment instrument is the Defining Issues Test (DIT) I & II. This instrument is not specific to the health professions. But it has been modified for use in, and influenced the development of other instruments in, the health professions. The DIT (...)
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  40. Zahra Meghani (2009). The Us' Food and Drug Administration, Normativity of Risk Assessment, Gmos, and American Democracy. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):125-139.score: 24.0
    The process of risk assessment of biotechnologies, such as genetically modified organisms (GMOs), has normative dimensions. However, the US’ Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seems committed to the idea that such evaluations are objective. This essay makes the case that the agency’s regulatory approach should be changed such that the public is involved in deciding any ethical or social questions that might arise during risk assessment of GMOs. It is argued that, in the US, neither aggregative nor deliberative (...)
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  41. Barbara Skorupinski & Konrad Ott (2002). Technology Assessment and Ethics. Poiesis and Praxis 1 (2):95-122.score: 24.0
    Technology assessment (TA) is – for several reasons – not detachable from ethical questions. The development of institutions and concepts for TA, especially in the USA and Western Europe, has been marked by an increasing tendency to focus evaluative and normative questions. In the following paper, we point out, in as far as the common notions of TA are implicitly normative, why reflection upon conceptual options of TA inevitably leads to ethical questions, and that the key question of participation (...)
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  42. Greg Mikkelson, How Might Economic Equality Affect Species Diversity?score: 24.0
    By Gregory M. Mikkelson School of Environment and Department of Philosophy McGill University, 3534 University Street Montréal, QC H3A 2A7 CANADA gregory.mikkelson@mcgill.ca Keynote contribution to the session "Integrating Ecological and Social Scales" Electronic conference "Landscape Scale Biodiversity Assessment" European Platform for Biodiversity, www.bioplatform.info Posted March 9th, 2005..
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  43. Franklin G. Miller & Luana Colloca (2011). The Placebo Phenomenon and Medical Ethics: Rethinking the Relationship Between Informed Consent and Risk–Benefit Assessment. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):229-243.score: 24.0
    It has been presumed within bioethics that the benefits and risks of treatments can be assessed independently of information disclosure to patients as part of the informed consent process. Research on placebo and nocebo effects indicates that this is not true for symptomatic treatments. The benefits and risks that patients experience from symptomatic treatments can be shaped powerfully by information about these treatments provided by clinicians. In this paper we discuss the implications of placebo and nocebo research for risk–benefit (...) and informed consent. (shrink)
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  44. André Nijhof, Stephan Cludts, Olaf Fisscher & Albertus Laan (2003). Measuring the Implementation of Codes of Conduct. An Assessment Method Based on a Process Approach of the Responsible Organisation. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):65 - 78.score: 24.0
    More and more organisations formulate a code of conduct in order to stimulate responsible behaviour among their members. Much time and energy is usually spent fixing the content of the code but many organisations get stuck in the challenge of implementing and maintaining the code. The code then turns into nothing else than the notorious "paper in the drawer", without achieving its aims. The challenge of implementation is to utilize the dynamics which have emerged from the formulation of the code. (...)
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  45. John Threlfall (2005). The Formative Use of Assessment Information in Planning: The Notion of Contingent Planning. British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (1):54 - 65.score: 24.0
    This article is concerned with the relationship between assessment information and teacher planning. In the UK, although planning used to be central to characterisations of formative assessment, the most recent government proclamations under the 'Assessment for Learning' banner offer no clear role for teachers making decisions about what to do based on assessment information. In this article, the reasons behind the shift will be examined. 'Contingent planning' will be proposed as a mechanism for using assessment (...)
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  46. Michiel van Oudheusden (2011). Questioning 'Participation': A Critical Appraisal of its Conceptualization in a Flemish Participatory Technology Assessment. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):673-690.score: 24.0
    This article draws attention to struggles inherent in discourse about the meaning of participation in a Flemish participatory technology assessment (pTA) on nanotechnologies. It explores how, at the project’s outset, key actors (e.g., nanotechnologists and pTA researchers) frame elements of the process like ‘the public’ and draw on interpretive repertoires to fit their perspective. The examples call into question normative commitments to cooperation, consensus building, and common action that conventionally guide pTA approaches. It is argued that pTA itself must (...)
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  47. Brian J. Richards (2008). Formative Assessment in Teacher Education: The Development of a Diagnostic Language Test for Trainee Teachers of German. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (2):184 - 204.score: 24.0
    This article describes the development and validation of a diagnostic test of German and its integration in a programme of formative assessment during a one-year initial teacher-training course. The test focuses on linguistic aspects that cause difficulty for trainee teachers of German as a foreign language and assesses implicit and explicit grammatical knowledge as well as students' confidence in this knowledge. Administration of the test to 57 German speakers in four groups (first-year undergraduates, fourth-year undergraduates, postgraduate trainees, and native (...)
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  48. Rob P. B. Reuzel, Gert-Jan van Der Wilt, Henk A. M. J. ten Have & Pieter F. de Vries Robbé (1999). Reducing Normative Bias in Health Technology Assessment: Interactive Evaluation and Casuistry. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):255-263.score: 24.0
    Health technology assessment (HTA) is often biased in the sense that it neglects relevant perspectives on the technology in question. To incorporate different perspectives in HTA, we should pursue agreement about what are relevant, plausible, and feasible research questions; interactive technology assessment (iTA) might be suitable for this goal. In this way a kind of procedural ethics is established. Currently, ethics too often is focussed on the application of general principles, which leaves a lot of confusion as to (...)
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  49. Cynthia Chappell & Nathan Carlin (2011). Public Health Ethics Education in a Competency-Based Curriculum: A Method of Programmatic Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (1):33-42.score: 24.0
    Public health ethics began to emerge in the 1990s as a development within bioethics. Public health ethics education has been implemented in schools of public health in recent years, and specific professionalism and ethics competencies were included in the Master of Public Health (MPH) competency set developed nationally and adapted by individual schools of public health around the country. The University of Texas School of Public Health approved the present set of MPH competencies in 2005. After 4 years of experience, (...)
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  50. Almo Farina & Brian Napoletano (2010). Rethinking the Landscape: New Theoretical Perspectives for a Powerful Agency. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (2):177-187.score: 24.0
    An ecological description of a landscape transcends its geographical definition to characterize it in terms of a complex agency composed of a spatial mosaic, structured energy, information and meaning. Because the dimensions of the landscape encompasses both natural and human processes, it requires a more robust set of theories that incorporate the material components and their perceptual meaning. A biosemiotic approach defines the landscape as the sum of its organisms’ eco-fields, which are spatial configurations that carry meanings (...)
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