Search results for 'Landscape assessment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Office of Technology Assessment (1982). An Assessment of Alternatives for a National Computerized Criminal History System. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 12 (3):14-25.
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  2.  73
    Allen Carlson (2009). Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics. Columbia University Press.
    The development and nature of environmental aesthetics -- Aesthetic appreciation and the natural environment -- The requirements for an adequate aesthetics of nature -- Aesthetic appreciation and the human environment -- Appreciation of the human environment under different conceptions -- Aesthetic appreciation and the agricultural landscape -- What is the correct way to aesthetically appreciate landscapes?
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  3.  19
    Arnold Berleant (1998). Living in the Landscape: Towards an Aesthetics of Environment. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (3):302-303.
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  4. Alexander Wilson (1992). The Culture of Nature North American Landscape From Disney to the Exxon Valdez. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5.  13
    Kate Flint & Howard Morphy (eds.) (2000). Culture, Landscape, and the Environment. Oxford University Press.
    The contributors to this volume move through time and space--from prehistoric Europe to the Enlightenment, and from industrial Victorian England to Aboriginal Australia--to compare the ways in which the environment is constructed in different ways across cultures.
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  6. William Norton (1989). Explorations in the Understanding of Landscape a Cultural Geography.
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  7. Ian H. Thompson (2000). Ecology, Community and Delight Sources of Values in Landscape Architecture.
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  8.  9
    Robert Mugerauer (1995). Interpreting Environments: Tradition, Deconstruction, Hermeneutics. University of Texas Press.
    Mugerauer seeks to make deconstruction and hermeneutics accessible to people in the environmental disciplines, including architecture, planning, urban studies, environmental studies, and cultural geography. Mugerauer demonstrates each methodology through a case study. The first study uses the traditional approach to recover the meaning of Jung's and Wittgenstein's houses by analyzing their historical, intentional contexts. The second case study utilizes deconstruction to explore Egyptian, French neoclassical, and postmodern attempts to use pyramids to constitute a sense of lasting presence. And the third (...)
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  9. Barry Saddler & Allen Carlson (1984). Environmental Aesthetics: Essays in Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (3):335-337.
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  10. S. James & David Ley (eds.) (1993). Place/Culture/Representation. Routledge.
     
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  11.  45
    Val Plumwood (2006). The Concept of a Cultural Landscape: Nature, Culture and Agency of the Land. Ethics and the Environment 11 (2):115-150.
    : The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Report issued in April 2005 shows how severely our civilisation is degrading and overstressing the natural systems that support human life and all other lives on earth. An important critical challenge, especially for the eco-humanities, is to help us understand the conceptual frameworks and systems that disappear the crucial support provided by natural systems and prevent us from seeing nature as a field of agency. This paper considers the currently popular concept of a cultural (...)
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  12.  6
    Maartje de Visser (2014). National Constitutional Courts, the Court of Justice and the Protection of Fundamental Rights in a Post-Charter Landscape. Human Rights Review 15 (1):39-51.
    This article critically evaluates the possible impact of the Charter on the relationship between the Court of Justice of the European Union and national constitutional courts. While it is premature to provide a definitive assessment of the kind of collaboration that these courts will develop, it is crucial to identify a number of features of the new landscape that will influence the direction in which the relationship between the CJEU and constitutional courts will evolve. This article discusses several (...)
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  13. Jacob Stegenga (forthcoming). Herding QATs: Quality Assessment Tools for Evidence in Medicine. In Huneman, Silberstein & Lambert (eds.), Herding QATs: Quality Assessment Tools for Evidence in Medicine.
    Medical scientists employ ‘quality assessment tools’ (QATs) to measure the quality of evidence from clinical studies, especially randomized controlled trials (RCTs). These tools are designed to take into account various methodological details of clinical studies, including randomization, blinding, and other features of studies deemed relevant to minimizing bias and error. There are now dozens available. The various QATs on offer differ widely from each other, and second-order empirical studies show that QATs have low inter-rater reliability and low inter-tool reliability. (...)
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  14.  32
    Martin Drenthen (2011). 'Reading Ourselves Through the Land: Landscape Hermeneutics and Ethics of Place'. In Forrest Clingerman Clingerman & Mark Dixon (eds.), 'Reading Ourselves Through the Land: Landscape Hermeneutics and Ethics of Place', In: F. Clingerman & M. Dixon : Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy, and Ethics. Ashgate
    In this text, I discuss the environmental education project "Legible Landscape ", which aims to teach inhabitants to read their landscape and develop a closer, more engaged relationship to place. I show that the project's semiotic perspective on landscape legibility tends to hamper the understanding of the moral dimension of reading landscapes, and argue that a hermeneutical perspective is better suited to acknowledge the way that readers and texts are intimately connected.
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  15.  1
    Clare Palmer & Emily Brady (2007). Landscape and Value in the Work of Alfred Wainwright. Landscape Research 32 (4):397-421.
    Alfred Wainwright was arguably the best known British guidebook writer of the20th century, and his work has been highly influential in promoting and directing fell-walking in northern Britain, in particular in the English Lake District. His work has, however, received little critical attention. This paper represents an initial attempt to undertake such a study. We examine Wainwright’s work through the lens of the landscape values and aesthetics that, we suggest,underpins it, and by an exploration of what might be called (...)
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  16. Tyson E. Lewis (2015). On Study: Giorgio Agamben and Educational Potentiality. Routledge.
    In an educational landscape dominated by discourses and practices of learning, standardized testing, and the pressure to succeed, what space and time remain for studying? In this book, Tyson E. Lewis argues that studying is a distinctive educational experience with its own temporal, spatial, methodological, aesthetic, and phenomenological dimensions. Unlike learning, which presents the actualization of a student’s "potential" in recognizable and measurable forms, study emphasizes the experience of potentiality, freed from predetermined outcomes. Studying suspends and interrupts the conventional (...)
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  17. Peter Railton (2014). The Affective Dog and its Rational Tale. Ethics 124 (4):813-859.
    Intuition—spontaneous, nondeliberative assessment—has long been indispensable in theoretical and practical philosophy alike. Recent research by psychologists and experimental philosophers has challenged our understanding of the nature and authority of moral intuitions by tracing them to “fast,” “automatic,” “button-pushing” responses of the affective system. This view of the affective system contrasts with a growing body of research in affective neuroscience which suggests that it is instead a flexible learning system that generates and updates a multidimensional evaluative landscape to guide (...)
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  18.  12
    André Nijhof, Stephan Cludts, Olaf Fisscher & Albertus Laan (2003). Measuring the Implementation of Codes of Conduct. An Assessment Method Based on a Process Approach of the Responsible Organisation. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):65 - 78.
    More and more organisations formulate a code of conduct in order to stimulate responsible behaviour among their members. Much time and energy is usually spent fixing the content of the code but many organisations get stuck in the challenge of implementing and maintaining the code. The code then turns into nothing else than the notorious "paper in the drawer", without achieving its aims. The challenge of implementation is to utilize the dynamics which have emerged from the formulation of the code. (...)
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  19. Donato Bergandi & Patrick Blandin (1998). Holism Vs. Reductionism: Do Ecosystem Ecology and Landscape Ecology Clarify the Debate? Acta Biotheoretica 46 (3):185-206.
    The holism-reductionism debate, one of the classic subjects of study in the philosopy of science, is currently at the heart of epistemological concerns in ecology. Yet the division between holism and reductionism does not always stand out clearly in this field. In particular, almost all work in ecosystem ecology and landscape ecology presents itself as holistic and emergentist. Nonetheless, the operational approaches used rely on conventional reductionist methodology.From an emergentist epistemological perspective, a set of general 'transactional' principles inspired by (...)
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  20.  60
    David Wright (2011). A Framework for the Ethical Impact Assessment of Information Technology. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):199-226.
    This paper proposes a framework for an ethical impact assessment which can be performed in regard to any policy, service, project or programme involving information technology. The framework is structured on the four principles posited by Beauchamp and Childress together with a separate section on privacy and data protection. The framework identifies key social values and ethical issues, provides some brief explanatory contextual information which is then followed by a set of questions aimed at the technology developer or policy-maker (...)
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  21.  7
    Michiel van Oudheusden (2011). Questioning 'Participation': A Critical Appraisal of its Conceptualization in a Flemish Participatory Technology Assessment. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):673-690.
    This article draws attention to struggles inherent in discourse about the meaning of participation in a Flemish participatory technology assessment (pTA) on nanotechnologies. It explores how, at the project’s outset, key actors (e.g., nanotechnologists and pTA researchers) frame elements of the process like ‘the public’ and draw on interpretive repertoires to fit their perspective. The examples call into question normative commitments to cooperation, consensus building, and common action that conventionally guide pTA approaches. It is argued that pTA itself must (...)
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  22.  71
    Erich Schienke, Seth Baum, Nancy Tuana, Kenneth Davis & Klaus Keller (2011). Intrinsic Ethics Regarding Integrated Assessment Models for Climate Management. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):503-523.
    In this essay we develop and argue for the adoption of a more comprehensive model of research ethics than is included within current conceptions of responsible conduct of research (RCR). We argue that our model, which we label the ethical dimensions of scientific research (EDSR), is a more comprehensive approach to encouraging ethically responsible scientific research compared to the currently typically adopted approach in RCR training. This essay focuses on developing a pedagogical approach that enables scientists to better understand and (...)
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  23.  6
    Rachel Wahl (forthcoming). What Can Be Known and How People Grow: The Philosophical Stakes of the Assessment Debate. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-17.
    Fierce debates over standardized assessments in teacher preparation have revolved around flaws in implementation and the politics of privatization. While important, this focus obscures the philosophical divide between proponents and opponents of standardized assessments. This article examines how faculty in New York State argue for and against a controversial performance assessment for teacher candidates, the edTPA. Revealing the distinctive ways that teacher educators on opposing sides of this debate understand the nature of knowledge, human development, professionalism, and social justice (...)
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  24. J. N. Mohanty (2008). The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl. Yale University Press.
    Edmund Husserl, known as the founder of the phenomenological movement, was one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. A prolific scholar, he explored an enormous landscape of philosophical subjects, including philosophy of math, logic, theory of meaning, theory of consciousness and intentionality, and ontology in addition to phenomenology. This deeply insightful book traces the development of Husserl’s thought from his earliest investigations in philosophy—informed by his work as a mathematician—to his publication of _Ideas_ in 1913. Jitendra (...)
     
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  25.  35
    Franklin G. Miller & Luana Colloca (2011). The Placebo Phenomenon and Medical Ethics: Rethinking the Relationship Between Informed Consent and Risk–Benefit Assessment. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):229-243.
    It has been presumed within bioethics that the benefits and risks of treatments can be assessed independently of information disclosure to patients as part of the informed consent process. Research on placebo and nocebo effects indicates that this is not true for symptomatic treatments. The benefits and risks that patients experience from symptomatic treatments can be shaped powerfully by information about these treatments provided by clinicians. In this paper we discuss the implications of placebo and nocebo research for risk–benefit (...) and informed consent. (shrink)
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  26.  21
    Lee Smolin (2013). A Perspective on the Landscape Problem. Foundations of Physics 43 (1):21-45.
    I discuss the historical roots of the landscape problem and propose criteria for its successful resolution. This provides a perspective to evaluate the possibility to solve it in several of the speculative cosmological scenarios under study including eternal inflation, cosmological natural selection and cyclic cosmologies.Invited contribution for a special issue of Foundations of Physics titled Forty Years Of String Theory: Reflecting On the Foundations.
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  27.  66
    Jan Baedke (2013). The Epigenetic Landscape in the Course of Time: Conrad Hal Waddington’s Methodological Impact on the Life Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):756-773.
    It seems that the reception of Conrad Hal Waddington’s work never really gathered speed in mainstream biology. This paper, offering a transdisciplinary survey of approaches using his epigenetic landscape images, argues that (i) Waddington’s legacy is much broader than is usually recognized—it is widespread across the life sciences (e.g. stem cell biology, developmental psychology and cultural anthropology). In addition, I will show that (ii) there exist as yet unrecognized heuristic roles, especially in model building and theory formation, which Waddington’s (...)
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  28.  23
    Caroline Gauthier (2005). Measuring Corporate Social and Environmental Performance: The Extended Life-Cycle Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):199 - 206.
    This papers attempts to bridge business ethics to corporate social responsibility including the social and environmental dimensions. The objective of the paper is to suggest an improvement of the most commonly used corporate environmental management tool, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The method includes two stages. First, more phases are added to the life-cycle of a product. Second, social criteria that measure the social performance of a product are introduced. An application of this “extended” LCA tool is given.
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  29.  2
    Anne Schwenkenbecher (forthcoming). What is Wrong with NIMBYs? Renewable Energy, Landscape Impacts and Incommensurable Values. Environmental Values.
    Local opposition to infrastructure projects implementing renewable energy (RE) such as wind farms is often strong even if state-wide support for RE is strikingly high. The slogan “Not In My BackYard” (NIMBY) has become synonymous for this kind of protest. This paper revisits the question of what is wrong with NIMBYs about RE projects and how to best address them. I will argue that local opponents to wind farm (and other RE) developments do not necessarily fail to contribute their fair (...)
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  30.  9
    Brent Daniel Mittelstadt, Bernd Carsten Stahl & N. Ben Fairweather (2015). How to Shape a Better Future? Epistemic Difficulties for Ethical Assessment and Anticipatory Governance of Emerging Technologies. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1027-1047.
    Empirical research into the ethics of emerging technologies, often involving foresight studies, technology assessment or application of the precautionary principle, raises significant epistemological challenges by failing to explain the relative epistemic status of contentious normative claims about future states. This weakness means that it is unclear why the conclusions reached by these approaches should be considered valid, for example in anticipatory ethical assessment or governance of emerging technologies. This paper explains and responds to this problem by proposing an (...)
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  31.  75
    Franz Huber (2007). The Logic of Theory Assessment. Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (5):511-538.
    This paper starts by indicating the analysis of Hempel's conditions of adequacy for any relation of confirmation (Hempel, 1945) as presented in Huber (submitted). There I argue contra Carnap (1962, Section 87) that Hempel felt the need for two concepts of confirmation: one aiming at plausible theories and another aiming at informative theories. However, he also realized that these two concepts are conflicting, and he gave up the concept of confirmation aiming at informative theories. The main part of the paper (...)
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  32.  1
    Jutta Jahnel (2015). Conceptual Questions and Challenges Associated with the Traditional Risk Assessment Paradigm for Nanomaterials. NanoEthics 9 (3):261-276.
    Risk assessment is an evidence-based analytical framework used to evaluate research findings related to environmental and public health decision-making. Different routines have been adopted for assessing the potential risks posed by substances and products to human health. In general, the traditional paradigm is a hazard-driven approach, based on a monocausal toxicological perspective. Questions have been raised about the applicability of the general chemical risk assessment approach in the specific case of nanomaterials. Most scientists and stakeholders assume that the (...)
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  33.  15
    Nick Peim & Kevin J. Flint (2009). Testing Times: Questions Concerning Assessment for School Improvement. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (3):342-361.
    Contemporary education now appears to be dominated by the continual drive for improvement measured against the assessment of what students have learned. It is our contention that a foundational relation with assessment organises contemporary education. Here we draw on a 'way of thinking' that is deconstructive in its intent. Such thinking makes clear the vicious circularity of the argument for improvement, wherein assessment valorised in discourses of improvement provides not only a rationalisation for improvement via assessment, (...)
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  34.  19
    Ariane Burke, Anne Kandler & David Good (2012). Women Who Know Their Place. Human Nature 23 (2):133-148.
    Differences between men and women in the performance of tests designed to measure spatial abilities are explained by evolutionary psychologists in terms of adaptive design. The Hunter-Gatherer Theory of Spatial Ability suggests that the adoption of a hunter-gatherer lifestyle (assuming a sexual division of labor) created differential selective pressure on the development of spatial skills in men and women and, therefore, cognitive differences between the sexes. Here, we examine a basic spatial skill—wayfinding (the ability to plan routes and navigate a (...)
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  35.  6
    Almo Farina (2008). The Landscape as a Semiotic Interface Between Organisms and Resources. Biosemiotics 1 (1):75-83.
    Despite an impressive number of investigations and indirect evidence, the mechanisms that link patterns and processes across the landscape remain a debated point. A new definition of landscape as a semiotic interface between resources and organisms opens up a new perspective to a better understanding of such mechanisms. If the landscape is considered a source of signals converted by animal cognition into signs, it follows that spatial configurations, extension, shape and contagion are not only landscape patterns (...)
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  36.  8
    Michael Bennett, Jake Gatof, Diana Bowman & Karinne Ludlow (2015). Regulating Emerging and Future Technologies in the Present. NanoEthics 9 (2):151-163.
    Scientific knowledge and technological expertise continue to evolve rapidly. Such innovation gives rise to new benefits as well as risks, at an ever-increasing pace. Within this context, regulatory regimes must function in order to address policymakers’ objectives. Innovation, though, can challenge the functioning and effectiveness of regulatory regimes. Questions over fit, effectiveness, and capacity of these regimes to ensure the safe entry of such technologies, and their products, onto the market will be asked in parallel to their development. With this (...)
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  37.  16
    Kevin Possin (2013). A Serious Flaw in the Collegiate Learning Assessment [CLA] Test. Informal Logic 33 (3):390-405.
    The Collegiate Learning Assessment Test has become popular and highly recommended, praised for its reliability and validity. I argue that while the CLA may be a commendable test for measuring critical-thinking, problem-solving, and logical-reasoning skills, those who are scoring students’ answers to the test’s questions are rendering the CLA invalid.
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  38.  22
    Zahra Meghani (2009). The Us' Food and Drug Administration, Normativity of Risk Assessment, Gmos, and American Democracy. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):125-139.
    The process of risk assessment of biotechnologies, such as genetically modified organisms (GMOs), has normative dimensions. However, the US’ Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seems committed to the idea that such evaluations are objective. This essay makes the case that the agency’s regulatory approach should be changed such that the public is involved in deciding any ethical or social questions that might arise during risk assessment of GMOs. It is argued that, in the US, neither aggregative nor deliberative (...)
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  39.  1
    Thaddeus Pope & Tanya Sellers (2012). Legal Briefing: The Unbefriended: Making Healthcare Decisions for Patients Without Surrogates (Part 1). Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):84-96.
    This issue’s “Legal Briefing” column continues coverage of recent legal developments involving medical decision making for unbefriended patients. These patients have neither decision-making capacity nor a reasonably available surrogate to make healthcare decisions on their behalf. This topic has been the subject of recent articles in JCE. It has been the subject of major policy reports. Indeed, caring for the unbefriended has even been described as the “single greatest category of problems” encountered in bioethics consultation. Moreover, the scope of the (...)
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  40.  83
    Soemini Kasanmoentalib (1996). Science and Values in Risk Assessment: The Case of Deliberate Release of Genetically Engineered Organisms. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (1):42-60.
    To make more responsible decisions regarding risk and to understand disagreements and controversies in risk assessments, it is important to know how and where values are infused into risk assessment and how they are embedded in the conclusions. In this article an attempt is made to disentangle the relationship of science and values in decision-making concerning the deliberate release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the environment. This exercise in applied philosophy of science is based on Helen Longino's contextual (...)
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  41.  3
    Michiel Wesseling, Lode Wigersma & Gerrit van der Wal (2016). Assessment Model for the Justification of Intrusive Lifestyle Interventions: Literature Study, Reasoning and Empirical Testing. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundIn many countries health insurers, employers and especially governments are increasingly using pressure and coercion to enhance healthier lifestyles. For example by ever higher taxes on cigarettes and alcoholic beverages, and ever stricter smoke-free policies. Such interventions can enhance healthier behaviour, but when they become too intrusive, an unfree society can emerge. Which lifestyle interventions that use pressure or coercion are justifiable and which are not? We tried to develop an assessment model that can be used for answering this (...)
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  42.  15
    Bjørn Hofmann (2005). On Value-Judgements and Ethics in Health Technology Assessment. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):277-295.
    The widespread application of technology in health care has imposed a broad range of challenges. The field of health technology assessment (HTA) is developed in order to face some of these challenges. However, this strategy has not been as successful as one could hope. One of the reasons for this is that social and ethical considerations have not been integrated in the HTA process. Nowadays however, such considerations have been included in many HTAs. Still, the conclusions and recommendations of (...)
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  43.  5
    Noelle M. Harden, Loka L. Ashwood, William L. Bland & Michael M. Bell (2013). For the Public Good: Weaving a Multifunctional Landscape in the Corn Belt. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):525-537.
    Critics of modern agriculture decry the dominance of monocultural landscapes and look to multifunctionality as a desirable alternative that facilitates the production of public goods. In this study, we explored opportunities for multifunctional Midwestern agriculture through participatory research led by farmers, landowners, and other local actors. We suggest that agriculture typically fosters some degree of multifunctionality that arises from the divergent intentions of actors. The result is a scattered arrangement of what we term patchwork multifunctionality, a ubiquitous status quo in (...)
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  44.  26
    Anya Plutynski (2008). The Rise and Fall of the Adaptive Landscape? Biology and Philosophy 23 (5):605-623.
    The discussion of the adaptive landscape in the philosophical literature appears to be divided along the following lines. On the one hand, some claim that the adaptive landscape is either “uninterpretable” or incoherent. On the other hand, some argue that the adaptive landscape has been an important heuristic, or tool in the service of explaining, as well as proposing and testing hypotheses about evolutionary change. This paper attempts to reconcile these two views.
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  45.  23
    Doris Schroeder & Clare Palmer (2003). Technology Assessment and the 'Ethical Matrix'. Poiesis and Praxis 1 (4):295-307.
    This paper explores the usefulness of the 'ethical matrix', proposed by Ben Mepham, as a tool in technology assessment, specifically in food ethics. We consider what the matrix is, how it might be useful as a tool in ethical decision-making, and what drawbacks might be associated with it. We suggest that it is helpful for fact-finding in ethical debates relating to food ethics; but that it is much less helpful in terms of weighing the different ethical problems that it (...)
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  46.  39
    E. Ann Clark & Hugh Lehman (2001). Assessment of GM Crops in Commercial Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):3-28.
    The caliber of recent discourse regarding geneticallymodified organisms (GMOs) has suffered from a lack of consensuson terminology, from the scarcity of evidence upon which toassess risk to health and to the environment, and from valuedifferences between proponents and opponents of GMOs. Towardsaddressing these issues, we present the thesis that GM should bedefined as the forcible insertion of DNA into a host genome,irrespective of the source of the DNA, and exclusive ofconventional or mutation breeding.Some defenders of the commercial use of GMOs (...)
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  47.  6
    Dario Sacchini, Andrea Virdis, Pietro Refolo, Maddalena Pennacchini & Ignacio Carrasco de Paula (2009). Health Technology Assessment (HTA): Ethical Aspects. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):453-457.
    “HTA is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology in a systematic, transparent, unbiased, robust manner. Its aim is to inform the formulation of safe, effective, health policies that are patient focused, and seek to achieve best value” (EUnetHTA 2007). Even though the assessment of ethical aspects of a health technology is listed as one of the objectives of a HTA process, in practice, the (...)
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  48.  12
    Renata Sõukand & Raivo Kalle (2010). Plant as Object Within Herbal Landscape: Different Kinds of Perception. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (3):299-313.
    This contribution takes the notion of herbal landscape (a mental field associated with plants used to cure or prevent diseases and established within specific cultural and climatic zones) as a starting point. The authors argue that the features by which a person recognises the plant in the natural growing environment is of crucial importance for the classification and the use of plants within the folk tradition. The process of perception of the plant can be divided into analytical categories according (...)
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  49.  3
    Thaddeus Pope & Tanya Sellers (2012). Legal Briefing: The Unbefriended: Making Healthcare Decisions for Patients Without Surrogates (Part 2). Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (2):177-192.
    This issue’s “Legal Briefing” column continues coverage of recent legal developments involving medical decision making for unbefriended patients. These patients have neither decision-making capacity nor a reasonably available surrogate to make healthcare decisions on their behalf. This topic has been the subject of recent articles in JCE. It has been the subject of major policy reports. Indeed, caring for the unbefriended has even been described as the “single greatest category of problems” encountered in bioethics consultation. Moreover, the scope of the (...)
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  50.  15
    Thomas S. Huddle (2007). The Limits of Objective Assessment of Medical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (6):487-496.
    Medical work is increasingly being subjected to objective assessment as those who pay for it seek to grasp the quality of that work and how best to improve it. While objective measures have a role in the assessment of health care, I argue that this role is currently overestimated and that no human practice such as medicine can be fully comprehended by objective assessment. I suggest that the character of practices, in which formalizations are combined with judgment, (...)
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