Search results for 'Language Game' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. Habermas (2007). The Language Game of Responsible Agency and the Problem of Free Will: How Can Epistemic Dualism Be Reconciled with Ontological Monism? Philosophical Explorations 10 (1):13 – 50.score: 180.0
    In this essay, I address the question of whether the indisputable progress being made by the neurosciences poses a genuine threat to the language game of responsible agency. I begin by situating free will as an ineliminable component of our practices of attributing responsibility and holding one another accountable, illustrating this via a discussion of legal discourse regarding the attribution of responsibility for criminal acts. I then turn to the practical limits on agents' scientific self-objectivation, limits that turn (...)
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  2. Debra Nails (forthcoming). On Wittgenstein: The Language-Game and Linguistics. Auslegung.score: 180.0
    Wittgenstein was not the "anti-philosopher" he is so often characterized as having been. this short paper points out inadequacies in some of the traditional views of wittgenstein's philosophy. it then suggests a more positive view of what wittgenstein believed the object of philosophy ought to be: in short, the language-game conceived as human activity, object and linguistic sign, mediated by the rules of grammar. finally, to provide an example of one of the ways in which philosophy might proceed, (...)
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  3. C. Sedmak (2001). The Language-Game of Revelation. Philosophy and Theology 13 (2):241-262.score: 180.0
    In recent studies it has been possible to apply new approaches in philosophy, especially of linguistic philosophy, to exegesis of the writings of the New Testament. Utilizing Wittgenstein’s model of language games, the following study of the meaning of the (apparently hidden) speech in the most difficult book of the NT, the “Book of Revelation,” reveals that the seer John does not speak of hidden events in the future but intends to point the addressee of his writing to a (...)
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  4. Sarah Brown‐Schmidt & Michael K. Tanenhaus (2008). Real‐Time Investigation of Referential Domains in Unscripted Conversation: A Targeted Language Game Approach. Cognitive Science 32 (4):643-684.score: 162.0
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  5. Lars Haikola (1977). Religion as Language-Game: A Critical Study with Special Regard to D. Z. Phillips. Liberläromedel/Gleerup.score: 162.0
     
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  6. Joachim Schulte (2013). Music and Language-Games. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):173-185.score: 160.0
    This paper aims to clarify certain aspects of the connections between music and (word) language alluded to in various manuscript passages by Wittgenstein. Three points are emphasized: (1) Wittgenstein’s willingness to speak of music as a language; (2) the importance of context; (3) the possibility of distinguishing various ways of explaining our hearing certain sequences of sounds as expressive of gestures or states of mind etc. Several attempts at elucidating the idea of understanding music lead to the realization (...)
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  7. Joyce N. Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72-96.score: 156.0
    : Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  8. Joyce Nira Davidson & Mick Smith (1999). Wittgenstein and Irigaray: Gender and Philosophy in a Language (Game) of Difference. Hypatia 14 (2):72 - 96.score: 156.0
    Drawing Wittgenstein's and Irigaray's philosophies into conversation might help resolve certain misunderstandings that have so far hampered both the reception of Irigaray's work and the development of feminist praxis in general. A Wittgensteinian reading of Irigaray can furnish an anti-essentialist conception of "woman" that retains the theoretical and political specificity feminism requires while dispelling charges that Irigaray's attempt to delineate a "feminine" language is either groundlessly utopian or entails a biological essentialism.
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  9. David Lewis (1979). Scorekeeping in a Language Game. Journal of Philosophical Logic 8 (1):339--359.score: 150.0
  10. Rae Langton & Caroline West (1999). Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):303 – 319.score: 150.0
  11. Rae Langton, Essay 3 Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game.score: 150.0
    If, as many suppose, pornography changes people, a question arises as to how.1 One answer to this question offers a grand and noble vision. Inspired by the idea that pornography is speech, and inspired by a certain liberal ideal about the point of speech in political life, some theorists say that pornography contributes to that liberal ideal: pornography, even at its most violent and misogynistic, and even at its most harmful, is political speech that aims to express certain views about (...)
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  12. Erik Stenius (1967). Mood and Language-Game. Synthese 17 (1):254 - 274.score: 150.0
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  13. John M. Connolly (1986). Gadamer and the Author's Authority: A Language-Game Approach. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (3):271-277.score: 150.0
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  14. Kevin Scharp (2005). Scorekeeping in a Defective Language Game. Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (1):203-226.score: 150.0
    One common criticism of deflationism is that it does not have the resources to explain defective discourse (e.g., vagueness, referential indeterminacy, confusion, etc.). This problem is especially pressing for someone like Robert Brandom, who not only endorses deflationist accounts of truth, reference, and predication, but also refuses to use representational relations to explain content and propositional attitudes. To address this problem, I suggest that Brandom should explain defective discourse in terms of what it is to treat some portion of discourse (...)
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  15. Alan Ross Anderson (1958). Mathematics and the "Language Game". Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):446 - 458.score: 150.0
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  16. Sandra Peterson (2000). The Language Game in Plato's Parmenides. Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):19-51.score: 150.0
  17. Alan Gewirth (1970). Must One Play the Moral Language Game? American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (2):107 - 118.score: 150.0
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  18. Terrance W. Klein (2006). The Supernatural as Language Game. Zygon 41 (2):365-380.score: 150.0
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  19. Barry Curtis (1987). The Language-Game of Morality. Philosophical Investigations 10 (1):31-53.score: 150.0
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  20. Markus Locker (2009). Jesus' Language-Games: The Significance of the Notion of Language-Game for a Reformulation of 'New Testament Biblical Theology'. Heythrop Journal 50 (3):392-401.score: 150.0
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  21. Patrick Sherry (1972). Truth and the "Religious Language-Game". Philosophy 47 (179):18 - 37.score: 150.0
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  22. Steven Fuller (1985). Is There A Language-Game That Even the Deconstructionist Can Play? Philosophy and Literature 9 (1):104-109.score: 150.0
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  23. John Churchill (1983). The Coherence of the Concept "Language-Game". Philosophical Investigations 6 (4):239-258.score: 150.0
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  24. Dagfinn Føllesdal (1967). Comments on Stenius's 'Mood and Language-Game'. Synthese 17 (1):275 - 280.score: 150.0
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  25. Helen Hervey (1961). The Problem of the Model Language-Game in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy. Philosophy 36 (138):333 - 351.score: 150.0
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  26. James Kellenberger (1972). The Language-Game View of Religion and Religious Certainty. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):255 - 275.score: 150.0
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  27. Ronald Duska (1972). The Ethical Language Game. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 46:177-188.score: 150.0
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  28. John Baker (1981). Playing the Language Game Game. Modern Schoolman 58 (3):185-193.score: 150.0
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  29. Zsuzsa Baross (1981). Kiss-Ass Talk': A Move in the Language Game of Servants and Masters. Semiotica 34 (1-2).score: 150.0
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  30. Ondřej Beran (2012). 'Basic Color Categories' in the Language-Game Perspective. Organon F 19 (4):423-443.score: 150.0
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  31. Karl Brose (1985). The Limits and Possibilities of the Language-Game. Ratio 27 (2).score: 150.0
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  32. Hans Martin Dober (2013). The Language Game of Divine Love According to Franz Rosenzweig and Karl Barth. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 55 (2):229-242.score: 150.0
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  33. Dale Jacquette (2010). Measure for Measure? Wittgenstein on Language-Game Criteria and the Paris Standard Metre Bar. In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
     
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  34. John Kuczmarski (forthcoming). The Expediency and Grace of the Postmodern Language Game. Philosophy.score: 150.0
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  35. Graeme Marshall (2000). The Transcendental Language Game. Epistemologia 23 (1):5-22.score: 150.0
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  36. P. K. Sasidharan (1998). Wittgenstein's Critique of Language Game: A Lyotardtian Dialectic. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 25:367-372.score: 150.0
     
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  37. Patrick Sherry (1979). Lars Haikola. Religion as Language-Game: A Critical Study with Special Regard to D. Z. Phillips. Pp. 168. (Lund: LiberLäromedel, 1977.) Kr.42. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 15 (2):261.score: 150.0
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  38. Bruce Vermazen (1970). Review: Erik Stenius, Mood and Language-Game; Lennart Aqvist, Semantic and Pragmatic Characterizability of Linguistic Usage. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):133-134.score: 150.0
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  39. Daniel Whiting (forthcoming). Languages, Language-Games, and Forms of Life. In H.-J. Glock & J. Hyman (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Wittgenstein. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 144.0
    In this paper, after outlining the methodological role Wittgenstein's appeal to language-games is supposed to play, I examine the picture of language which his discussion of such games and their relations to what Wittgenstein calls forms of life suggests. It is a picture according to which language and its employment are inextricably connected to wider contexts—they are embedded in specific natural and social environments, they are tied to purposive activities serving provincial needs, and caught up in distinctive (...)
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  40. Don Ross (2012). Notes on Coordination, Game Theory and the Evolutionary Basis of Language. Interaction Studies 13 (1):50-65.score: 144.0
    It is widely appreciated that establishment and maintenance of coordination are among the key evolutionary promoters and stabilizers of human language. In consequence, it is also generally recognized that game theory is an important tool for studying these phenomena. However, the best known game theoretic applications to date tend to assimilate linguistic communication with signaling. The individualistic philosophical bias in Western social ontology makes signaling seem more challenging than it really is, and thus focuses attention on theoretical (...)
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  41. Kees van Deemter, What Game Theory Can Do for NLG: The Case of Vague Language.score: 144.0
    This informal position paper brings together some recent developments in formal semantics and pragmatics to argue that the discipline of Game Theory is well placed to become the theoretical backbone of Natural Language Generation. To demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of the Game-Theoretical approach, we focus on the utility of vague expressions. More specifically, we ask what light Game Theory can shed on the question when an NLG system should generate vague language.
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  42. Kees van Deemter, Game Theory and Language Generation.score: 144.0
    This informal position paper brings together some recent developments in formal semantics and pragmatics to argue that the discipline of Game Theory is well placed to become the theoretical backbone of Natural Language Generation. To demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of the Game-Theoretical approach, we focus on the utility of vague expressions. More specifically, we ask what light Game Theory can shed on the question when an NLG system should generate vague language.
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  43. Stephen Timmons (2006). Wittgenstein's Language Games as a Theory of Learning Disabilities. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):20-22.score: 130.0
  44. Mathibu Marion (2006). Hintikka on Wittgenstein: From Language-Games to Game Semantics. Acta Philosophica Fennica 78:255.score: 130.0
     
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  45. Gregory McCulloch (1989). The Game of the Name: Introducing Logic, Language, and Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    This introduction to modern work in analytic philosophy uses the example of the proper name to give a clear explanation of the logical theories of Gottlob Frege, and explain the application of his ideas to ordinary language. McCulloch then shows how meaning is rooted in the philosophy of mind and the question of intentionality, and looks at the ways in which thought can be "about" individual material objects.
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  46. Stevan Harnad (2005). Language and the Game of Life. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):497-498.score: 126.0
    Steels & Belpaeme's (S&B's) simulations contain all the right components, but they are put together wrongly. Color categories are unrepresentative of categories in general and language is not merely naming. Language evolved because it provided a powerful new way to acquire categories (through instruction, rather than just the old way of other species, through trial-and-error experience). It did not evolve so that multiple agents looking at the same objects could let one another know which of the objects they (...)
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  47. Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen (2003). Logic, Language Games and Ludics. Acta Analytica 18 (30/31):89-123.score: 124.0
    Wittgenstein’s language games can be put into a wider service by virtue of elements they share with some contemporary opinions concerning logic and the semantics of computation. I will give two examples: manifestations of language games and their possible variations in logical studies, and their role in some of the recent developments in computer science. It turns out that the current paradigm of computation that Girard termed Ludics bears a striking resemblance to members of language games. Moreover, (...)
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  48. Alessandro Arbo (2013). Language Games and Musical Understanding. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (1):187-200.score: 124.0
    Wittgenstein has often explored language games that have to do with musical objects of different sizes (phrases, themes, formal sections or entire works). These games can refer to a technical language or to common parlance and correspond to different targets. One of these coincides with the intention to suggest a way of conceiving musical understanding. His model takes the form of the invitation to "hear (something) as (something)": typically, to hear a musical passage as an introduction or as (...)
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  49. Joseph Heath (1996). Is Language a Game? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):1 - 28.score: 120.0
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  50. Gail Soffer (1994). Is Language a Game? Études Phénoménologiques 10 (20):27-63.score: 120.0
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