Search results for 'Language acquisition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aarre Laakso & Paco Calvo (2011). How Many Mechanisms Are Needed to Analyze Speech? A Connectionist Simulation of Structural Rule Learning in Artificial Language Acquisition. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1243-1281.score: 180.0
    Some empirical evidence in the artificial language acquisition literature has been taken to suggest that statistical learning mechanisms are insufficient for extracting structural information from an artificial language. According to the more than one mechanism (MOM) hypothesis, at least two mechanisms are required in order to acquire language from speech: (a) a statistical mechanism for speech segmentation; and (b) an additional rule-following mechanism in order to induce grammatical regularities. In this article, we present a set of (...)
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  2. Nick Chater & Morten H. Christiansen (2010). Language Acquisition Meets Language Evolution. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1131-1157.score: 180.0
    Recent research suggests that language evolution is a process of cultural change, in which linguistic structures are shaped through repeated cycles of learning and use by domain-general mechanisms. This paper draws out the implications of this viewpoint for understanding the problem of language acquisition, which is cast in a new, and much more tractable, form. In essence, the child faces a problem of induction, where the objective is to coordinate with others (C-induction), rather than to model the (...)
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  3. Anne S. Hsu & Nick Chater (2010). The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition: A Probabilistic Perspective. Cognitive Science 34 (6):972-1016.score: 180.0
    Natural language is full of patterns that appear to fit with general linguistic rules but are ungrammatical. There has been much debate over how children acquire these “linguistic restrictions,” and whether innate language knowledge is needed. Recently, it has been shown that restrictions in language can be learned asymptotically via probabilistic inference using the minimum description length (MDL) principle. Here, we extend the MDL approach to give a simple and practical methodology for estimating how much linguistic data (...)
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  4. Alexander Clark & Shalom Lappin (2013). Complexity in Language Acquisition. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):89-110.score: 180.0
    Learning theory has frequently been applied to language acquisition, but discussion has largely focused on information theoretic problems—in particular on the absence of direct negative evidence. Such arguments typically neglect the probabilistic nature of cognition and learning in general. We argue first that these arguments, and analyses based on them, suffer from a major flaw: they systematically conflate the hypothesis class and the learnable concept class. As a result, they do not allow one to draw significant conclusions about (...)
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  5. Steven Walczak (2002). A Context-Based Computational Model of Language Acquisition by Infants and Children. Foundations of Science 7 (4):393-411.score: 180.0
    This research attempts to understand howchildren learn to use language. Instead ofusing syntax-based grammar rules to model thedifferences between children''s language andadult language, as has been done in the past, anew model is proposed. In the new researchmodel, children acquire language by listeningto the examples of speech that they hear intheir environment and subsequently use thespeech examples that have been previously heardin similar contextual situations. A computermodel is generated to simulate this new modelof language (...). The MALL computerprogram will listen to examples of humanspeech, as would occur around a child, and thentry to use these examples in new situationsthat are similar to the contextual situationsin which the language examples were heard. This will provide a better understanding of howchildren learn to use language and howeducators can assist or improve the languagelearning process by providing required examplesof speech or by helping children to develop abetter understanding of similarities betweenvarious contexts. (shrink)
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  6. A. Brandt, M. Gebrian & L. R. Slevc (2011). Music and Early Language Acquisition. Frontiers in Psychology 3:327-327.score: 180.0
    Language is typically viewed as fundamental to human intelligence. Music, while recognized as a human universal, is often treated as an ancillary ability—one dependent on or derivative of language. In contrast, we argue that it is more productive from a developmental perspective to describe spoken language as a special type of music. A review of existing studies presents a compelling case that musical hearing and ability is essential to language acquisition. In addition, the authors challenge (...)
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  7. Janne von Koss Torkildsen Joanne Arciuli (2012). Advancing Our Understanding of the Link Between Statistical Learning and Language Acquisition: The Need for Longitudinal Data. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 180.0
    Mastery of language can be a struggle for some children. Amongst those that succeed in achieving this feat there is variability in proficiency. Cognitive scientists remain intrigued by this variation. A now substantial body of research suggests that language acquisition is underpinned by a child's capacity for statistical learning. Moreover, a growing body of research has demonstrated that variability in statistical learning is associated with variability in language proficiency. Yet, there is a striking lack of longitudinal (...)
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  8. Samuel David Epstein, Suzanne Flynn & Gita Martohardjono (1996). Second Language Acquisition: Theoretical and Experimental Issues in Contemporary Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):677-714.score: 174.0
    To what extent, if any, does Universal Grammar (UG) constrain second language (L2) acquisition? This is not only an empirical question, but one which is currently investigable. In this context, L2 acquisition is emerging as an important new domain of psycholinguistic research. Three logical possibilities have been articulated regarding the role of UG in L2 acquisition: The first is the hypothesis that claims that no aspect of UG is available to the L2 learner. The second is (...)
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  9. Fiona Cowie (1997). The Logical Problem of Language Acquisition. Synthese 111 (1):17-51.score: 168.0
    Arguments from the Logical Problem of Language Acquisition suggest that since linguistic experience provides few negative data that would falsify overgeneral grammatical hypotheses, innate knowledge of the principles of Universal Grammar must constrain learners hypothesis formulation. Although this argument indicates a need for domain-specific constraints, it does not support their innateness. Learning from mostly positive data proceeds unproblematically in virtually all domains. Since not every domain can plausibly be accorded its own special faculty, the probative value of the (...)
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  10. Ping Li & Xiaowei Zhao (2013). Self-Organizing Map Models of Language Acquisition. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 168.0
    Connectionist models have had a profound impact on theories of language. While most early models were inspired by the classic PDP architecture, recent models of language have explored various other types of models, including self-organizing models for language acquisition. In this paper we aim at providing a review of the latter type of models, and highlight a number of simulation experiments that we have conducted based on these models. We show that self-organizing connectionist models can provide (...)
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  11. Michael Ramscar & Daniel Yarlett (2007). Linguistic Self‐Correction in the Absence of Feedback: A New Approach to the Logical Problem of Language Acquisition. Cognitive Science 31 (6):927-960.score: 150.0
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  12. Jill Lany, Rebecca L. Gómez & Lou Ann Gerken (2007). The Role of Prior Experience in Language Acquisition. Cognitive Science 31 (3):481-507.score: 150.0
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  13. Nathan Stemmer (1989). Empiricist Versus Prototype Theories of Language Acquisition. Mind and Language 4 (3):201-221.score: 144.0
  14. Stephen Crain (1991). Language Acquisition in the Absence of Experience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):597-612.score: 138.0
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  15. Oren Kolodny, Arnon Lotem & Shimon Edelman (2014). Learning a Generative Probabilistic Grammar of Experience: A Process‐Level Model of Language Acquisition. Cognitive Science 38 (4).score: 132.0
    We introduce a set of biologically and computationally motivated design choices for modeling the learning of language, or of other types of sequential, hierarchically structured experience and behavior, and describe an implemented system that conforms to these choices and is capable of unsupervised learning from raw natural-language corpora. Given a stream of linguistic input, our model incrementally learns a grammar that captures its statistical patterns, which can then be used to parse or generate new data. The grammar constructed (...)
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  16. Christina Behme & H. S. (2008). Language Learning in Infancy: Does the Empirical Evidence Support a Domain Specific Language Acquisition Device? Philosophical Psychology 21 (5):641 – 671.score: 120.0
    Poverty of the Stimulus Arguments have convinced many linguists and philosophers of language that a domain specific language acquisition device (LAD) is necessary to account for language learning. Here we review empirical evidence that casts doubt on the necessity of this domain specific device. We suggest that more attention needs to be paid to the early stages of language acquisition. Many seemingly innate language-related abilities have to be learned over the course of several (...)
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  17. Bettina Schmitz & tr Jansen, Julia (2005). Homelessness or Symbolic Castration? Subjectivity, Language Acquisition, and Sociality in Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan. Hypatia 20 (2):69-87.score: 120.0
    : How much violence can a society expect its members to accept? A comparison between the language theories of Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan is the starting point for answering this question. A look at the early stages of language acquisition exposes the sacrificial logic of patriarchal society. Are those forces that restrict the individual to be conceived in a martial imagery of castration or is it possible that an existing society critically questions those points of socialization (...)
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  18. Eli Dresner (2002). Holism, Language Acquisition, and Algebraic Logic. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (4):419-452.score: 120.0
    In the first section of this paper I present a well known objection to meaning holism, according to which holism is inconsistent with natural language being learnable. Then I show that the objection fails if language acquisition includes stages of partial grasp of the meaning of at least some expressions, and I argue that standard model theoretic semantics cannot fully capture such stages. In the second section the above claims are supported through a review of current research (...)
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  19. Jerry H. Gill (1986). Metaphor and Language Acquisition: A View From the West Pole. Southern Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):219-233.score: 120.0
    The focus is on the crucial role played by metaphor in language acquisition, Following the insights of wittgenstein, Barfield, And polanyi. Emphasis is placed on the essentially informal and tacit dynamics involved in the mediation of meaning.
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  20. Teresa Satterfield (2008). Language Acquisition Recapitulates Language Evolution? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):532-533.score: 120.0
    Christiansen & Chater (C&C) focus solely on general-purpose cognitive processes in their elegant conceptualization of language evolution. However, numerous developmental facts attested in L1 acquisition confound C&C's subsequent claim that the logical problem of language acquisition now plausibly recapitulates that of language evolution. I argue that language acquisition should be viewed instead as a multi-layered construction involving the interplay of general and domain-specific learning mechanisms.
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  21. Chris Sinha, Lis A. Thorseng, Mariko Hayashi & Kim Plunkett (1994). Comparative Spatial Semantics and Language Acquisition: Evidence From Danish, English, and Japanese. Journal of Semantics 11 (4):253-287.score: 120.0
    Spatial relational meaning is typically predominantly expressed in English and related languages by die locative particle system. Even between closely related languages such as Danish and English, there are substantial differences with respect to both the semantics and the morphology of locative particles. Other languages (including Japanese), although they may use locative particles in spatial relational expression, distribute spatial relational meaning quite differendy between and within form classes. We investigate the consequences of these differences for the acquisition of spatial (...)
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  22. Alexander Clark, Computational Learning Theory and Language Acquisition.score: 120.0
    Computational learning theory explores the limits of learnability. Studying language acquisition from this perspective involves identifying classes of languages that are learnable from the available data, within the limits of time and computational resources available to the learner. Different models of learning can yield radically different learnability results, where these depend on the assumptions of the model about the nature of the learning process, and the data, time, and resources that learners have access to. To the extent that (...)
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  23. Peter F. Dominey (2004). Situation Alignment and Routinization in Language Acquisition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):195-195.score: 120.0
    Pickering & Garrod (P&G) describe a mechanism by which the situation models of dialog participants become progressively aligned via priming at different levels. This commentary attempts to characterize how alignment and routinization can be extended into the language acquisition domain by establishing links between alignment and joint attention, and between routinization and grammatical construction learning.
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  24. Shimon Edelman, Some Tests of an Unsupervised Model of Language Acquisition.score: 120.0
    We outline an unsupervised language acquisition algorithm and offer some psycholinguistic support for a model based on it. Our approach resembles the Construction Grammar in its general philosophy, and the Tree Adjoining Grammar in its computational characteristics. The model is trained on a corpus of transcribed child-directed speech (CHILDES). The model’s ability to process novel inputs makes it capable of taking various standard tests of English that rely on forced-choice judgment and on magnitude estimation of linguistic acceptability. We (...)
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  25. Christina E. Erneling (1993). Understanding Language Acquisition: The Framework of Learning. State University of New York Press.score: 120.0
    She challenges the usefulness of the concept of a "language of thought" in explaining language acquisition, and draws on the later work of Wittgenstein to develop an alternative approach. Paper edition (unseen), $14.95.
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  26. Leo Postman (1962). The Effects of Language Habits on the Acquisition and Retention of Verbal Associations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (1):7.score: 120.0
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  27. Chengjun Wang (2009). On Linguistic Environment for Foreign Language Acquisition. Asian Culture and History 1 (1):P58.score: 120.0
    It is clear that children acquire their first language without explicit learning. A foreign or second language is usually learned but to some degree may also be acquired or “picked up” depending on the environmental setting. So, this article mainly discusses the linguistic environmental setting for foreign language acquisition. It suggested that we should make an effective linguistic environment for foreign language acquisition in foreign language classroom.
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  28. Edith L. Bavin (2009). Widening the Field: The Process of Language Acquisition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):449-450.score: 120.0
    Evans & Levinson (E&L) argue against Universal Grammar on the basis of language diversity. A related and fundamental issue is whether the language input provides sufficient information for a child to acquire it. I briefly discuss the more integrated approaches to language acquisition which focus on the mechanisms, and research showing that input cues provide valuable information for the language learner.
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  29. Stephen Crain & Paul M. Pietroski (2002). Why Language Acquisition is a Snap. Linguistic Review.score: 114.0
    Nativists inspired by Chomsky are apt to provide arguments with the following general form: languages exhibit interesting generalizations that are not suggested by casual (or even intensive) examination of what people actually say; correspondingly, adults (i.e., just about anyone above the age of four) know much more about language than they could plausibly have learned on the basis of their experience; so absent an alternative account of the relevant generalizations and speakers' (tacit) knowledge of them, one should conclude that (...)
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  30. Paul Pietrowski, Why Language Acquisition is a Snap.score: 114.0
    Nativists inspired by Chomsky are apt to provide arguments with the following general form: languages exhibit interesting generalizations that are not suggested by casual (or even intensive) examination of what people actually say; correspondingly, adults (i.e., just about anyone above the age of four) know much more about language than they could plausibly have learned on the basis of their experience; so absent an alternative account of the relevant generalizations and speakers' (tacit) knowledge of them, one should conclude that (...)
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  31. Shimon Edelman, Unsupervised Context Sensitive Language Acquisition From a Large Corpus.score: 114.0
    We describe a pattern acquisition algorithm that learns, in an unsupervised fashion, a streamlined representation of linguistic structures from a plain natural-language corpus. This paper addresses the issues of learning structured knowledge from a large-scale natural language data set, and of generalization to unseen text. The implemented algorithm represents sentences as paths on a graph whose vertices are words (or parts of words). Significant patterns, determined by recursive context-sensitive statistical inference, form new vertices. Linguistic constructions (...)
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  32. Gary M. Olson (1973). Memory Development and Language Acquisition. In T. E. Moore (ed.), Cognitive Development and the Acquisition of Language. Academic.score: 114.0
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  33. Steven Pinker (1986). Productivity and Conservatism in Language Acquisition. In William Demopoulos (ed.), Language Learning and Concept Acquisition. Ablex. 54--79.score: 114.0
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  34. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Language and Natural Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.score: 108.0
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate (...)
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  35. Anne S. Hsu, Nick Chater & Paul Vitányi (2013). Language Learning From Positive Evidence, Reconsidered: A Simplicity-Based Approach. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):35-55.score: 108.0
    Children learn their native language by exposure to their linguistic and communicative environment, but apparently without requiring that their mistakes be corrected. Such learning from “positive evidence” has been viewed as raising “logical” problems for language acquisition. In particular, without correction, how is the child to recover from conjecturing an over-general grammar, which will be consistent with any sentence that the child hears? There have been many proposals concerning how this “logical problem” can be dissolved. In this (...)
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  36. Alexa R. Romberg & Jenny R. Saffran (2013). All Together Now: Concurrent Learning of Multiple Structures in an Artificial Language. Cognitive Science 37 (7):1290-1320.score: 108.0
    Natural languages contain many layers of sequential structure, from the distribution of phonemes within words to the distribution of phrases within utterances. However, most research modeling language acquisition using artificial languages has focused on only one type of distributional structure at a time. In two experiments, we investigated adult learning of an artificial language that contains dependencies between both adjacent and non-adjacent words. We found that learners rapidly acquired both types of regularities and that the strength of (...)
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  37. Howard Sankey (2010). Descartes's Language Test and Ape Language Research. Teorema 29 (2):111-123.score: 108.0
    Some philosophers (e.g. Descartes) argue that there is an evidential relationship between language and thought, such that presence of language is indicative of mind. Recent language acquisition research with apes such as chimpanzees and bonobos attempts to demonstrate the capacity of these primates to acquire at least rudimentary linguistic capacity. This paper presents a case study of the ape language research and explores the consequences of the research with respect to the argument that animals lack (...)
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  38. Maryellen C. MacDonald (2013). How Language Production Shapes Language Form and Comprehension. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 108.0
    Language production processes can provide insight into how language comprehension works and language typology—why languages tend to have certain characteristics more often than others. Drawing on work in memory retrieval, motor planning, and serial order in action planning, the Production-Distribution-Comprehension (PDC) account links work in the fields of language production, typology, and comprehension: 1) faced with substantial computational burdens of planning and producing utterances, language producers implicitly follow three biases in utterance planning that promote word (...)
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  39. Geoffrey Sampson (1989). Language Acquisition: Growth or Learning? Philosophical Papers 18 (3):203-240.score: 102.0
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  40. Anna Papafragou (2010). Source-Goal Asymmetries in Motion Representation: Implications for Language Production and Comprehension. Cognitive Science 34 (6):1064-1092.score: 102.0
    Recent research has demonstrated an asymmetry between the origins and endpoints of motion events, with preferential attention given to endpoints rather than beginnings of motion in both language and memory. Two experiments explore this asymmetry further and test its implications for language production and comprehension. Experiment 1 shows that both adults and 4-year-old children detect fewer within-category changes in source than goal objects when tested for memory of motion events; furthermore, these groups produce fewer references to source than (...)
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  41. Valentina Cuccio (2014). From a Bodily-Based Format of Knowledge to Symbols. The Evolution of Human Language. Biosemiotics 7 (1):49-61.score: 102.0
    Although ontogeny cannot recapitulate phylogeny, a two-level model of the acquisition of language will be here proposed and its implication for the evolution of the faculty of language will be discussed. It is here proposed that the identification of the cognitive requirements of language during ontogeny could help us in the task of identifying the phylogenetic achievements that concurred, at some point, to the acquisition of language during phylogeny. In this model speaking will be (...)
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  42. Pierre Perruchet (2005). Statistical Approaches to Language Acquisition and the Self-Organizing Consciousness: A Reversal of Perspective. Psychological Research/Psychologische Forschung. Vol 69 (5-6):316-329.score: 102.0
  43. K. Cormier, A. Schembri, D. Vinson & E. Orfanidou (2012). First Language Acquisition Differs From Second Language Acquisition in Prelingually Deaf Signers: Evidence From Sensitivity to Grammaticality Judgement in British Sign Language. Cognition 124 (1):50-65.score: 102.0
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  44. L. A. Petitto (1987). On the Autonomy of Language and Gesture: Evidence From the Acquisition of Personal Pronouns in American Sign Language. Cognition 27 (1):1-52.score: 102.0
    Two central assumptions of current models of language acquisition were addressed in this study: (1) knowledge of linguistic structure is "mapped onto" earlier forms of non-linguistic knowledge; and (2) acquiring a language involves a continuous learning sequence from early gestural communication to linguistic expression. The acquisition of the first and second person pronouns ME and YOU was investigated in a longitudinal study of two deaf children of deaf parents learning American Sign Language (ASL) as a (...)
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  45. A. M. Borghi, A. Flumini, F. Cimatti, D. Marocco & C. Scorolli (2010). Manipulating Objects and Telling Words: A Study on Concrete and Abstract Words Acquisition. Frontiers in Psychology 2:15-15.score: 102.0
    Four experiments (E1-E2-E3-E4) investigated whether different acquisition modalities lead to the emergence of differences typically found between concrete and abstract words, as argued by the Words As Tools (WAT) proposal. To mimic the acquisition of concrete and abstract concepts, participants either manipulated novel objects or observed groups of objects interacting in novel ways (training1). In TEST 1 participants decided whether two elements belonged to the same category. Later they read the category labels (training2); labels could be accompanied by (...)
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  46. Jay L. Garfield, Candida C. Peterson & Tricia Perry (2001). Social Cognition, Language Acquisition and the Development of the Theory of Mind. Mind and Language 16 (5):494–541.score: 96.0
  47. M. J. Cain (2007). Language Acquisition and the Theory Theory. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):447-474.score: 96.0
    In this paper my concern is to evaluate a particular answer to the question of how we acquire mastery of the syntax of our first language. According to this answer children learn syntax by means of scientific investigation. Alison Gopnik has recently championed this idea as an extension of what she calls the ‘theory theory’, a well established approach to cognitive development in developntental psychology. I will argue against this extension of the theory theory. The general thrust of my (...)
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  48. Makoto Kanazawa (2004). Computational Approaches to Language Acquisition, Michael R. Brent, Ed. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 13 (3):377-379.score: 96.0
  49. Grays Hall Basement (1994). Language Acquisition: A Linguistic Introduction. By Helen Goodluck. Oxford & Cambridge, Ma: Blackwell, 1991. Pp. VIII, 224. Cloth $57.95, Paper $19.95. Reviewed by Cecile McKee, University of Washington, and Guy Modica, University of Washington and Nagoya Shoka Daigaku Many Linguists Will Appreciate Goodluck's Introductory Textbook on First. [REVIEW] In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
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  50. Peter Ford Dominey (2013). Recurrent Temporal Networks and Language Acquisition—From Corticostriatal Neurophysiology to Reservoir Computing. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 96.0
    One of the most paradoxical aspects of human language is that it is so unlike any other form of behavior in the animal world, yet at the same time, it has developed in a species that is not far removed from ancestral species that do not possess language. While aspects of non-human primate and avian interaction clearly constitute communication, this communication appears distinct from the rich, combinatorial and abstract quality of human language. So how does the human (...)
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