Search results for 'Language and languages' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Xinli Wang (2003). Presuppositional Languages and the Failure of Cross-Language Understanding. Dialogue 42 (01):53-77.score: 192.0
    Why is mutual understanding between two substantially different comprehensive language communities often problematic and even unattainable? To answer this question, the author first introduces a notion of presuppositional languages. Based on the semantic structure of a presuppositional language, the author identifies a significant condition necessary for effective understanding of a language: the interpreter is able to effectively understand a language only if he/she is able to recognize and comprehend its metaphysical presuppositions. The essential role of (...)
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  2. P. Perniss, R. L. Thompson & G. Vigliocco (2009). Iconicity as a General Property of Language: Evidence From Spoken and Signed Languages. Frontiers in Psychology 1:227-227.score: 168.0
    Current views about language are dominated by the idea of arbitrary connections between linguistic form and meaning. However, if we look beyond the more familiar Indo-European languages and also include both spoken and signed language modalities, we find that motivated, iconic form-meaning mappings are, in fact, pervasive in language. In this paper, we review the different types of iconic mappings that characterize languages in both modalities, including the predominantly visually iconic mappings in signed languages. (...)
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  3. Deborah Cates David P. Corina, Laurel A. Lawyer (2012). Cross-Linguistic Differences in the Neural Representation of Human Language: Evidence From Users of Signed Languages. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 168.0
    Studies of deaf individuals who are users of signed languages have provided profound insight into the neural representation of human language. Case studies of deaf signers who have incurred left- and right-hemisphere damage have shown that left-hemisphere resources are a necessary component of sign language processing. These data suggest that, despite frank differences in the input and output modality of language,; core left perisylvian regions universally serve linguistic function. Neuroimaging studies of deaf signers have generally provided (...)
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  4. Daniel Whiting (forthcoming). Languages, Language-Games, and Forms of Life. In H.-J. Glock & J. Hyman (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Wittgenstein. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 166.0
    In this paper, after outlining the methodological role Wittgenstein's appeal to language-games is supposed to play, I examine the picture of language which his discussion of such games and their relations to what Wittgenstein calls forms of life suggests. It is a picture according to which language and its employment are inextricably connected to wider contexts—they are embedded in specific natural and social environments, they are tied to purposive activities serving provincial needs, and caught up in distinctive (...)
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  5. Xinli Wang (2007). Incommensurability and Cross-Language Communication. Ashgate Publishing Ltd, England.score: 132.0
    Against the received translation-failure interpretation, this book presents a presuppositional interpretation of incommensurability, that is, the thesis of incommensurability as cross-language communication breakdown due to the incompatible metaphysical presuppositions underlying two competing presuppositional languages, such as scientific languages. This semantically sound, epistemologically well-established, and metaphysically profound interpretation not only affirms the tenability of the notion of incommensurability and confirms the reality of the phenomenon of incommensurability, but also makes some significant contributions to the discussion of many related (...)
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  6. Johannes Bronkhorst (2011). Language and Reality: On an Episode in Indian Thought. Brill.score: 132.0
    Aim of the lectures -- Early Brahmanical literature -- Panini's grammar -- A passage from the Chandogya Upanisad -- The structures of languages -- The Buddhist contribution -- Vaisesika and language -- Verbal knowledge -- The contradictions of Nagarjuna -- The reactions of other thinkers -- Sarvastivada Samkhya -- The Agamasastra of Gaudapada -- Sankara -- Kashmiri Saivism -- Jainism -- Early Vaisesika -- Critiques of the existence of a thing before its arising -- Nyaya -- Mimamsa -- (...)
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  7. Stephen C. Levinson & Asifa Majid (2013). The Island of Time: Yélî Dnye, the Language of Rossel Island. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 132.0
    This paper describes the linguistic description of time, the accompanying gestural system and the “mental time lines” found in the speakers of Yélî Dnye, an isolate language spoken offshore from Papua New Guinea. Like many indigenous languages, Yélî Dnye has no fixed anchoring of time and thus no calendrical time. Instead, time in Yélî Dnye linguistic description is primarily anchored to the time of speaking, with six diurnal tenses and special nominals for n days from coding time; this (...)
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  8. Camilo Thorne & Diego Calvanese (2012). Tractability and Intractability of Controlled Languages for Data Access. Studia Logica 100 (4):787-813.score: 132.0
    In this paper we study the semantic data complexity of several controlled fragments of English designed for natural language front-ends to OWL (Web Ontology Language) and description logic ontology-based systems. Controlled languages are fragments of natural languages, obtained by restricting natural language syntax, vocabulary and semantics with the goal of eliminating ambiguity. Semantic complexity arises from the formal logic modelling of meaning in natural language and fragments thereof. It can be characterized as the computational (...)
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  9. Umberto Eco (1999). Serendipities: Language & Lunacy. Harcourt Brace.score: 132.0
    Serendipities is a careful unraveling of the fabulous and the false, a brilliant exposition of how unanticipated truths often spring from false ideas. From Leibniz's belief that the I Ching illustrated the principles of calculus to Marco Polo's mistaking a rhinoceros for a unicorn, Umberto Eco offers a dazzling tour of intellectual history, illuminating the ways in which we project the familiar onto the strange to make sense of the world. Uncovering layers of mistakes that have shaped human history, Eco (...)
     
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  10. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice: Deafness, Language, and the Senses--A Philosophical History. Metropolitan Books, H. Holt and Co..score: 132.0
    A groundbreaking study of deafness, by a philosopher who combines the scientific erudition of Oliver Sacks with the historical flair of Simon Schama. There is nothing more personal than the human voice, traditionally considered the expression of the innermost self. But what of those who have no voice of their own and cannot hear the voices of others? In this tour de force of historical narrative, Jonathan Ree tells the astonishing story of the deaf, from the sixteenth century to the (...)
     
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  11. Anthony P. R. Howatt & Richard C. Smith (eds.) (1820/2002). Foundations of Foreign Language Teaching: Nineteenth-Century Innovators. Routledge.score: 132.0
    Contents include Language as a Means of Mental Culture and International Communication (1853; 2 vols) by Claude Marcel; The Mastery of Languages, or the Art of Speaking Foreign Tongues Idiomatically (1864) by Thomas Prendergast; Introduction to the Teaching of Living Languages without Grammar or Dictionary (1874) by Lambert Sauveur; and The Art of Teaching and Studying Languages (1880; English translation 1892) by Francois Goiun.
     
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  12. Wilhelm Humboldt (1999). On Language: On the Diversity of Human Language Construction and its Influence on the Mental Development of the Human Species. Cambridge University Press.score: 132.0
    Wilhelm von Humboldt's classic study of human language was first published in 1836, as a general introduction to his three-volume treatise on the Kawi language of Java. It is the final statement of his lifelong study of the nature of language, exploring its universal structures and its relation to mind and culture. Empirically wide-ranging - Humboldt goes far beyond the Indo-European family of languages - it remains one of the most interesting and important attempts to draw (...)
     
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  13. Wilhelm Humboldt (1988). On Language: The Diversity of Human Language-Structure and its Influence on the Mental Development of Mankind. Cambridge University Press.score: 132.0
    This is an entirely new translation of one of the fundamental works in the development of the study of language. Published in 1836, it formed the general introduction to Wilhelm von Humboldt's three-volume treatise on the Kawi language of Java. It is the final statement of his lifelong study of the nature of language, and presents a survey of a great many languages, exploring ways in which their various grammatical structures make them more or less suitable (...)
     
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  14. Sarah Sawyer (ed.) (2009). New Waves in Philosophy of Language. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 132.0
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on ContributorsLinguistic Puzzles and Semantic Pretence--B.Armour-Garb &--J.Woodbridge Minimal Semantics and the Nature of Psychological Evidence--E.BorgA Naturalistic Approach to the Philosophy of Language--J.Collins In Praise of our Linguistic Intuitions--A.EverettPhenomenal Continua and Secondary Properties--P.Greenough Semantic Oughts in Context--A.Hattiangadi Content, Force and Semantic Norms--M.KlbelLinguistic Competence and Propositional Knowledge--G.LongworthExpressives and Beyond--S.PredelliAnalyticity in Externalist Languages--G.Russell Names as Predicates--S.SawyerThe Epistemic Reading of Counterfactual Conditionals--K.Schulz Introduction, Transmission, and the Foundations of Meaning--J.SpeaksIndex.
     
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  15. Rama Kant Agnihotri & H. K. Dewan (eds.) (2010). Knowledge, Language and Learning. Macmillan Publishers India.score: 124.0
    Issues in the construction of knowledge -- Language, mind and cognition -- Aspects of language -- Curricular areas.
     
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  16. Robert Wardy (2000/2006). Aristotle in China: Language, Categories, and Translation. Cambridge University Press.score: 124.0
    This book considers the relation between language and thought. Robert Wardy explores this huge topic by analyzing linguistic relativism with reference to a Chinese translation of Aristotle's Categories. He addresses some key questions, such as, do the basic structures of language shape the major thought patterns of its native speakers? Could philosophy be guided and constrained by the language in which it is done? And does Aristotle survive rendition into Chinese intact? Wardy's answers will fascinate philosophers, Sinologists, (...)
     
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  17. William G. Lycan (2000). Philosophy of Language: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 120.0
    Philosophy of Language introduces the non-specialist to the main issues and theories in twentieth-century philosophy of language, focusing specifically on linguistic phenomena. Part I explores several theories of how proper names, descriptions, and other terms bear a referential relation to non-linguistic objects. Part II surveys competing theories of linguistic meaning and compares their various advantages and liabilities. Part III introduces the basic concepts of linguistic pragmatics, includes a detailed discussion of the problems of indirect force, and Part IV (...)
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  18. Hilary Putnam (1975). Mind, Language, and Reality. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    Professor Hilary Putnam has been one of the most influential and sharply original of recent American philosophers in a whole range of fields. His most important published work is collected here, together with several new and substantial studies, in two volumes. The first deals with the philosophy of mathematics and of science and the nature of philosophical and scientific enquiry; the second deals with the philosophy of language and mind. Volume one is now issued in a new edition, including (...)
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  19. Martin Heidegger (2004). On the Essence of Language: The Metaphysics of Language and the Essencing of the Word ; Concerning Herder's Treatise on the Origin of Language/ Martin Heidegger ; Translated by Wanda Torres Gregory and Yvonne Unna. State University of New York Press.score: 120.0
    This English translation of Vom Wesen der Sprache, volume 85 of Martin Heidegger's Gesamtausgabe, contains fascinating discussions of language that are important both for those interested in Heidegger's thought and for those who wish to ...
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  20. Barry C. Smith (2006). What I Know When I Know a Language. In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    EVERY speaker of a language knows a bewildering variety of linguistic facts, and will come to know many more. It is knowledge that connects sound and meaning. Questions about the nature of this knowledge cannot be separated from fundamental questions about the nature of language. The conception of language we should adopt depends on the part it plays in explaining our knowledge of language. This chapter explores options in accounting for language, and our knowledge of (...)
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  21. Michael Morris (2007). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    In this textbook, Michael Morris offers a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way of approaching both the central topics and the various traditions of dealing with them. Texts include classic writings by Frege, Russell, Kripke, Quine, Davidson, Austin, Grice and Wittgenstein. Theoretical jargon is kept to a minimum and is (...)
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  22. Joseph F. Graham (1992). Onomatopoetics: Theory of Language and Literature. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    The relationship of words to the things they represent and to the mind that forms them has long been the subject of linguistic enquiry. Joseph Graham's challenging book takes this debate into the field of literary theory, making a searching enquiry into the nature of literary representation. It reviews the arguments of Plato's Cratylus on how words signify things, and of Chomsky's theory of the innate "natural" status of language (contrasted with Saussure's notion of its essential arbitrariness). In the (...)
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  23. Richard Heck (ed.) (1997). Language, Thought, and Logic: Essays in Honour of Michael Dummett. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    In this exciting new collection, a distinguished international group of philosophers contribute new essays on central issues in philosophy of language and logic, in honor of Michael Dummett, one of the most influential philosophers of the late twentieth century. The essays are focused on areas particularly associated with Professor Dummett. Five are contributions to the philosophy of language, addressing in particular the nature of truth and meaning and the relation between language and thought. Two contributors discuss time, (...)
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  24. Ian Hacking (1975). Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    Many people find themselves dissatisfied with recent linguistic philosophy, and yet know that language has always mattered deeply to philosophy and must in some sense continue to do so. Ian Hacking considers here some dozen case studies in the history of philosophy to show the different ways in which language has been important, and the consequences for the development of the subject. There are chapters on, among others, Hobbes, Berkeley, Russell, Ayer, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, Feyerabend and Davidson. Dr (...)
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  25. Jennifer Hornsby & Guy Longworth (eds.) (2006). Reading Philosophy of Language: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary. Blackwell Pub..score: 120.0
    Designed for readers new to the subject, Reading Philosophy of Language presents key texts in the philosophy of language together with helpful editorial guidance. A concise collection of key texts in the philosophy of language Ideal for readers new to the subject. Features seminal texts by leading figures in the field, such as Austin, Chomsky, Davidson, Dummett and Searle. Presents three texts on each of five key topics: speech and performance; meaning and truth; knowledge of language; (...)
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  26. Christopher D. Viger (2005). Learning to Think: A Response to the Language of Thought Argument for Innateness. Mind and Language 20 (3):313-25.score: 120.0
    Jerry Fodor's argument for an innate language of thought continues to be a hurdle for researchers arguing that natural languages provide us with richer conceptual systems than our innate cognitive resources. I argue that because the logical/formal terms of natural languages are given a usetheory of meaning, unlike predicates, logical/formal terms might be learned without a mediating internal representation. In that case, our innate representational system might have less logical structure than a natural language, making it (...)
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  27. Michael Devitt & Richard Hanley (eds.) (2006). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Pub..score: 120.0
    The Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Language is a collection of twenty new essays in a cutting-edge and wide-ranging field. Surveys central issues in contemporary philosophy of language while examining foundational topics Provides pedagogical tools such as abstracts and suggestions for further readings Topics addressed include the nature of meaning, speech acts and pragmatics, figurative language, and naturalistic theories of reference.
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  28. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (eds.) (1997). A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Pub..score: 120.0
    Written by an international assembly of leading philosophers, this volume provides a survey of contemporary philosophy of language.
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  29. Hans-Johann Glock (2003). Quine and Davidson on Language, Thought, and Reality. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    Quine and Davidson are among the leading thinkers of the twentieth century. Their influence on contemporary philosophy is second to none, and their impact is also strongly felt in disciplines such as linguistics and psychology. This is the first book devoted to both of them, but also the first to question some of their basic assumptions. Hans-Johann Glock critically scrutinizes their ideas on ontology, truth, necessity, meaning and interpretation, thought, and language, and shows that their attempts to accommodate meaning (...)
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  30. Alex Barber (ed.) (2003). Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    What must linguistic knowledge be like if it is to explain our capacity to use language? All linguists and philosophers of language presuppose some answer to this critical question, but all too often the presupposition is tacit. In this collection of sixteen previously unpublished essays, a distinguished international line-up of philosophers and linguists address a variety of interconnected themes concerning our knowledge of language.
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  31. Noam Chomsky (2000). New Horizons in the Study of Language and Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    This book is an outstanding contribution to the philosophical study of language and mind, by one of the most influential thinkers of our time. In a series of penetrating essays, Chomsky cuts through the confusion and prejudice which has infected the study of language and mind, bringing new solutions to traditional philosophical puzzles and fresh perspectives on issues of general interest, ranging from the mind-body problem to the unification of science. Using a range of imaginative and deceptively simple (...)
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  32. Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.) (1998). Language and Thought: Interdisciplinary Themes. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    What is the place of language in human cognition? Do we sometimes think in natural language? Or is language for purposes of interpersonal communication only? Although these questions have been much debated in the past, they have almost dropped from sight in recent decades amongst those interested in the cognitive sciences. Language and Thought is intended to persuade such people to think again. It brings together essays by a distinguished interdisciplinary team of philosophers and psychologists, who (...)
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  33. Noam Chomsky (2002). On Nature and Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    Featuring an essay by the author on the role of intellectuals in society and government, a fascinating volume sheds light on the relation between language, mind ...
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  34. Albert Borgmann (1974). The Philosophy of Language. The Hague,Nijhoff.score: 120.0
    CHAPTER ONE THE ORIGIN OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE 1. The accessibility of the original reflections on language. Heraclitus The philosophy of language has ...
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  35. Charles Travis (1989). The Uses of Sense: Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    This book provides a novel interpretation of the ideas about language in Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. Travis places the "private language argument" in the context of wider themes in the Investigations, and thereby develops a picture of what it is for words to bear the meaning they do. He elaborates two versions of a private language argument, and shows the consequences of these for current trends in the philosophical theory of meaning.
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  36. Cristina Lafont (2000). Heidegger, Language, and World-Disclosure. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    This book is a major contribution to the understanding of Heidegger and a rare attempt to bridge the schism between traditions of analytic and Continental philosophy. Cristina Lafont applies the core methodology of analytic philosophy, language analysis, to Heidegger's work providing both a clearer exegesis and a powerful critique of his approach to the subject of language. In Part One, she explores the Heideggerean conception of language in depth. In Part Two, she draws on recent work from (...)
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  37. Jean-Jacques Lecercle (2002). Deleuze and Language. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 120.0
    In the field of philosophy of language, is there life beyond Chomsky? Deleuze's deep distrust for, and fascination with language provide a positive answer - nothing less than a brand new philosophy of language, where pragmatics replaces structural linguistics, and where the literary text and the concept of style have pride of place. This should be good news not only for philosophers, but for linguistics and literary critics as well.
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  38. Hannah Dawson (2007). Locke, Language, and Early-Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    In a powerful and original contribution to the history of ideas, Hannah Dawson explores the intense preoccupation with language in early-modern philosophy, and presents a groundbreaking analysis of John Locke's critique of words. By examining a broad sweep of pedagogical and philosophical material from antiquity to the late seventeenth century, Dr Dawson explains why language caused anxiety in writers such as Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Gassendi, Nicole, Pufendorf, Boyle, Malebranche and Locke. Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy demonstrates (...)
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  39. J. O. Urmson, Jonathan Dancy, J. M. E. Moravcsik & C. C. W. Taylor (eds.) (1988). Human Agency: Language, Duty, and Value: Philosophical Essays in Honor of J.O. Urmson. Stanford University Press.score: 120.0
    The essays in this volume explore current work in central areas of philosophy, work unified by attention to salient questions of human action and human agency. They ask what it is for humans to act knowledgeably, to use language, to be friends, to act heroically, to be mortally fortunate, and to produce as well as to appreciate art. The volume is dedicated to J. O. Urmson, in recognition of his inspirational contributions to these areas. All the essays but one (...)
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  40. John V. Canfield (1981). Wittgenstein, Language and World. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 120.0
    Language Games 2 This chapter provides some background necessary for subsequent discussions by sketching in the idea of a language game, thereby giving a ...
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  41. Kanti Lal Das & Anirban Mukherjee (eds.) (2008). Language and Ontology. Northern Book Centre.score: 120.0
    The book highlights the concept of ontology, relationship between language and ontology, the distinction between ontology and reality, the role of linguistic ...
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  42. David G. Stern (1995). Wittgenstein on Mind and Language. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Drawing on ten years of research on the unpublished Wittgenstein papers, Stern investigates what motivated Wittgenstein's philosophical writing and casts new light on the Tractatus and Philosophical Investigations. The book is an exposition of Wittgenstein's early conception of the nature of representation and how his later revision and criticism of that work led to a radically different way of looking at mind and language. It also explains how the unpublished manuscripts and typescripts were put together and why they often (...)
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  43. Joseph J. Kockelmans (1972). On Heidegger and Language. Evanston [Ill.]Northwestern University Press.score: 120.0
    Language, meaning, and ek-sistence, by J. J. Kockelmans.--Heidegger's conception of language in Being and time, by J. Aler.--Poetry and language in Heidegger, by W. Biemel.--Heidegger's topology of being, by O. Pöggeler.--Thinking and poetizing in Heidegger, by H. Birault.--Hermeneutic and personal structure of language, by H. Ott.--Ontological difference, hermeneutics, and language, by J. J. Kockelmans.--The world in another beginning: poetic dwelling and the role of the poet, by W. Marx.--Panel discussion.--Heidegger's language: metalogical forms of thought (...)
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  44. Roy Harris (1988). Language, Saussure, and Wittgenstein: How to Play Games with Words. Routledge.score: 120.0
    Saussure as a linguist and Wittgenstein as a philosopher of language are arguably the two most important figures in the development of twentieth-century ...
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  45. Harold G. Coward (1980). The Sphota Theory of Language: A Philosophical Analysis. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 120.0
    According to Bhartrhari, these are the three levels of language through which ... necessarily identified with language, since these levels of language, ...
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  46. R. M. Sainsbury (2002). Departing From Frege: Essays in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge.score: 120.0
    This text argues that we must depart considerably from Frege's own views if we are to work towards an adequate conception of natural language.
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  47. Christian Emden (2005). Nietzsche on Language, Consciousness, and the Body. University of Illinois Press.score: 120.0
    The irreducibility of language : the history of rhetoric in the age of typewriters -- The failures of empiricism : language, science, and the philosophical tradition -- What is a trope? : the discourse of metaphor and the language of the body -- The nervous systems of modern consciousness : metaphor, physiology, and mind -- Interpretation and life : outlines of an anthropology of knowledge.
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  48. Deborah K. W. Modrak (2001). Aristotle's Theory of Language and Meaning. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    This is a book about Aristotle's philosophy of language, interpreted in a framework that provides a comprehensive interpretation of Aristotle's metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology and science. The aims of the book are to explicate the description of meaning contained in De Interpretatione and to show the relevance of that theory of meaning to much of the rest of Arisotle's philosophy. In the process Deborah Modrak reveals how that theory of meaning has been much maligned.
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  49. Peter G. Stromberg (1993). Language and Self-Transformation: A Study of the Christian Conversion Narrative. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    This is a study of how self-transformation may occur through the practice of reframing one's personal experience in terms of a canonical language: that is, a system of symbols that purports to explain something about human beings and the universe they live in. The Christian conversion narrative is used as the primary example here, but the approach used in this book also illuminates other practices such as psychotherapy in which people deal with emotional conflict through language.
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  50. Sören Stenlund (1990). Language and Philosophical Problems. Routledge.score: 120.0
    Sören Stenlund's work marks a major advance in our understanding of why the philosophy of language has been so dominated over the past few decades by the so-called "creative aspect of language" -- the problem of how we are able to understand sentences that we have never heard before. Stenlund raises some fundamental philosophical objections by demonstrating, for example, how the theory distorts the flexibility and fluidity of word -- and sentence -- meaning. Although words and sentences can (...)
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