Search results for 'Language and languages History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter D. Fenves (1993). "Chatter": Language and History in Kierkegaard. Stanford University Press.
    'Chatter' cannot always be taken lightly, for its insignificance and insubstantiality challenge the very notions of substance and significance through which rational discourses seek justification. This book shows that in 'chatter' Kierkegaard uncovered a specifically linguistic mode of negativity. The author examines in detail those writings of Kierkegaard in which he undertook complex negotiations with the threat - and also the promise - of 'chatter', which cuts across the distinctions in which the relation of language to reality - and (...)
     
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  2. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice: Deafness, Language, and the Senses--A Philosophical History. Metropolitan Books, H. Holt and Co..
    A groundbreaking study of deafness, by a philosopher who combines the scientific erudition of Oliver Sacks with the historical flair of Simon Schama. There is nothing more personal than the human voice, traditionally considered the expression of the innermost self. But what of those who have no voice of their own and cannot hear the voices of others? In this tour de force of historical narrative, Jonathan Ree tells the astonishing story of the deaf, from the sixteenth century to the (...)
     
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  3.  12
    Angelo Mazzocco (1993). Linguistic Theories in Dante and the Humanists: Studies of Language and Intellectual History in Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Italy. E.J. Brill.
    This work goes beyond the strict, technical periphery of linguistic enquiry, and becomes a study of intellectual history.
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  4. Nigel Love (ed.) (2006). Language and History: Integrationist Perspectives. Routledge.
    When linguistics was first established as an academic discipline in the nineteenth century, it was envisaged as an essentially historical study. Languages were to be treated as historical objects, evolving through gradual but constant processes of change over long periods of time. In recent years, however, there has been much discussion by historians of a 'linguistic turn' in their own discipline, and, in linguistics, integrationist theory has mounted a radical challenge to the traditional notion of 'languages' as possible (...)
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  5. Crispin Sartwell (2000). End of Story: Toward an Annihilation of Language and History. State University of New York Press.
    Argues that the academy's obsession with language, and in particular with narrative, has become a sort of disease.
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  6. Talbot J. Taylor (ed.) (1997). Theorizing Language: Analysis, Normativity, Rhetoric, History. Pergamon.
    Although what language users in different cultures say about their own language has long been recognized as of potential interest, its theoretical importance to the study of language has typically been thought to be no more than peripheral. Theorizing Language is the first book to place the reflexive character of language at the very centre both of its empirical study and of its theoretical explanation. Language can only be explained as a cultural product of (...)
     
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  7.  6
    Melvin Richter (1990). Reconstructing the History of Political Languages: Pocock, Skinner, and the Geschichtfiche Grundbegriffe. History and Theory 29 (1):38-70.
    The program of the Geschichtliche Grundbegriffe, formulated primarily by Otto Brunner, Werner Conze, and Reinhart Koselleck, calls for relating conceptual change to structural transformations of government, society, and economy in German-speaking Europe. J. G. A. Pocock, of Cambridge, identified the range of alternative and competing political discourses available to early modern writers, while Quentin Skinner, also of Cambridge, treated political theories in terms of those historical contexts and linguistic conventions which both facilitate and circumscribe legitimations of political arrangements, and he (...)
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  8.  15
    Johannes Bronkhorst (2011). Language and Reality: On an Episode in Indian Thought. Brill.
    Aim of the lectures -- Early Brahmanical literature -- Panini's grammar -- A passage from the Chandogya Upanisad -- The structures of languages -- The Buddhist contribution -- Vaisesika and language -- Verbal knowledge -- The contradictions of Nagarjuna -- The reactions of other thinkers -- Sarvastivada Samkhya -- The Agamasastra of Gaudapada -- Sankara -- Kashmiri Saivism -- Jainism -- Early Vaisesika -- Critiques of the existence of a thing before its arising -- Nyaya -- Mimamsa -- (...)
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  9.  34
    Christian Emden (2005). Nietzsche on Language, Consciousness, and the Body. University of Illinois Press.
    The irreducibility of language : the history of rhetoric in the age of typewriters -- The failures of empiricism : language, science, and the philosophical tradition -- What is a trope? : the discourse of metaphor and the language of the body -- The nervous systems of modern consciousness : metaphor, physiology, and mind -- Interpretation and life : outlines of an anthropology of knowledge.
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  10. Christie McDonald & Gary Wihl (eds.) (1994). Transformations in Personhood and Culture After Theory: The Languages of History, Aesthetics, and Ethics. Penn State University Press.
    The essays in this collection focus on the essentially moral desire within humanistic inquiry to seek a point of contact between personal experience and intellectual reflection. The book is concerned with the development of a plural vocabulary of transformation that stems from the language of historians, philosophers, feminists, and aestheticians. It delineates a significant and widespread change in intellectual perspective that resists homogenizing the objects of study to abstract conceptual models and structures. What emerges from this volume are personal, (...)
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  11. Christie McDonald & Gary Wihl (eds.) (2005). Transformations in Personhood and Culture After Theory: The Languages of History, Aesthetics, and Ethics. Penn State University Press.
    The essays in this collection focus on the essentially moral desire within humanistic inquiry to seek a point of contact between personal experience and intellectual reflection. The book is concerned with the development of a plural vocabulary of transformation that stems from the language of historians, philosophers, feminists, and aestheticians. It delineates a significant and widespread change in intellectual perspective that resists homogenizing the objects of study to abstract conceptual models and structures. What emerges from this volume are personal, (...)
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  12.  39
    Hannah Dawson (2007). Locke, Language, and Early-Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In a powerful and original contribution to the history of ideas, Hannah Dawson explores the intense preoccupation with language in early-modern philosophy, and presents a groundbreaking analysis of John Locke's critique of words. By examining a broad sweep of pedagogical and philosophical material from antiquity to the late seventeenth century, Dr Dawson explains why language caused anxiety in writers such as Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Gassendi, Nicole, Pufendorf, Boyle, Malebranche and Locke. Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy (...)
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  13. Claudia Crawford (1988). The Beginnings of Nietzsche's Theory of Language. Walter De Gruyter.
    The Beginnings of Nietzsche's Theory of Language is concerned with the years 1865 through Winter/Spring 1870-71. Four texts of Nietzsche's, "Vom Ursprung der Sprache", "Zur Teleologie", "Zu Schopenhauer", and "Anschauung Notes", are translated into English and interpreted from the perspective of Nietzsche's developing theory of language. An examination of the major influences of Schopenhauer, Kant, Eduard von Hartmann, and Frederick A. Lange are pursued. ;Theory, in this work, does not assume that it is (...)
     
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  14. Anthony P. R. Howatt & Richard C. Smith (eds.) (1820/2002). Foundations of Foreign Language Teaching: Nineteenth-Century Innovators. Routledge.
    Contents include Language as a Means of Mental Culture and International Communication (1853; 2 vols) by Claude Marcel; The Mastery of Languages, or the Art of Speaking Foreign Tongues Idiomatically (1864) by Thomas Prendergast; Introduction to the Teaching of Living Languages without Grammar or Dictionary (1874) by Lambert Sauveur; and The Art of Teaching and Studying Languages (1880; English translation 1892) by Francois Goiun.
     
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  15. Hans Aarsleff (1982). From Locke to Saussure Essays on the Study of Language and Intellectual History. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  16. Hans Aarsleff (1982). From Locke to Saussure Essays on the Study of Language and Intellectual History /Hans Aarsleff. --. --. University of Minnesota Press, C1982.
     
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  17. S. Morris Engel (1969). Language and Illumination Studies in the History of Philosophy. M. Nijhoff.
     
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  18. Roy Harris (2003). History, Science, and the Limits of Language: An Integrationist Approach. Indian Institute of Advanced Study.
     
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  19. Brigitte Nerlich & David D. Clarke (1996). Language, Action, and Context the Early History of Pragmatics in Europe and America, 1780-1930.
     
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  20. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice a Philosophical History of Language, Deafness and the Senses.
     
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  21. Nancy S. Struever (1995). Language and the History of Thought. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  22. Siegfried J. Schmidt (2011). Transitions: Language, Literature, Media. Peter Lang.
    Precursors of the linguistic turn: German philosophy of language in the late 19th century -- From text to discourse: a shift towards a pragmatic interpretation of "fictionality" -- Projecting a science of literature: on a theoretical basis for a rational science of literature -- The empirical science of literature ESL: a new paradigm -- From literary communication to literary systems -- Implementations: conventions and literary systems -- Unfinished business: literary history -- Changes in epistemology: media revisited -- Histories (...)
     
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  23.  38
    David G. Stern (1995). Wittgenstein on Mind and Language. Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on ten years of research on the unpublished Wittgenstein papers, Stern investigates what motivated Wittgenstein's philosophical writing and casts new light on the Tractatus and Philosophical Investigations. The book is an exposition of Wittgenstein's early conception of the nature of representation and how his later revision and criticism of that work led to a radically different way of looking at mind and language. It also explains how the unpublished manuscripts and typescripts were put together and why they often (...)
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  24.  32
    Deborah K. W. Modrak (2001). Aristotle's Theory of Language and Meaning. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about Aristotle's philosophy of language, interpreted in a framework that provides a comprehensive interpretation of Aristotle's metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology and science. The aims of the book are to explicate the description of meaning contained in De Interpretatione and to show the relevance of that theory of meaning to much of the rest of Arisotle's philosophy. In the process Deborah Modrak reveals how that theory of meaning has been much maligned.
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  25. Hans Aarsleff (1979). The Study of Language in England, 1780-1860. Greenwood Press.
  26.  15
    Stephen Everson (ed.) (1994). Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This third Companion To Ancient Thought is devoted to ancient theories of language. The chapters range over more than eight hundred years of philosophical enquiry, and provide critical analyses of all the principal accounts of how it is that language can have meaning and how we can come to acquire linguistic understanding. The discussions move from the naturalism examined in Plato's Cratylus to the sophisticated theories of the Hellenistic schools and the work of St Augustine. The relations between (...)
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  27. Tom Jones (2005). Pope and Berkeley: The Language of Poetry and Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The first study dedicated to the relationship between Alexander Pope and George Berkeley, this book undertakes a comparative reading of their work on the visual environment, economics and providence, challenging current ideas of the relationship between poetry and philosophy in early eighteenth-century Britain. It shows how Berkeley's idea that the phenomenal world is the language of God, learnt through custom and experience, can help to explain some of Pope's conservative sceptical arguments, and also his virtuoso poetic techniques.
     
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  28.  58
    Brian Rabern (2016). The History of the Use of ⟦.⟧-Notation in Natural Language Semantics. Semantics and Pragmatics 9 (12).
    In contemporary natural languages semantics one will often see the use of special brackets to enclose a linguistic expression, e.g. ⟦carrot⟧. These brackets---so-called denotation brackets or semantic evaluation brackets---stand for a function that maps a linguistic expression to its "denotation" or semantic value (perhaps relative to a model or other parameters). Even though this notation has been used in one form or another since the early development of natural language semantics in the 1960s and 1970s, Montague himself didn't (...)
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  29.  32
    Michael N. Forster (2011). German Philosophy of Language: From Schlegel to Hegel and Beyond. Oxford University Press.
    This book not only sets the historical record straight but also champions the Herderian tradition for its philosophical depth and breadth.
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  30. Roy Harris (2004). The Linguistics of History. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31.  80
    Nicholas Denyer (1991). Language, Thought, and Falsehood in Ancient Greek Philosophy. Routledge.
    CONTRASTING PREJUDICES TRUTH AND FALSEHOOD How can one say something false? How can one even think such a thing? Since, for example, all men are mortal, ...
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  32.  8
    Julian N. Wasserman & Lois Roney (eds.) (1989). Sign, Sentence, Discourse: Language in Medieval Thought and Literature. Syracuse University Press.
    EDITORS' INTRODUCTION B he Vedas tell of a conversation between a young man, Shvetaketu, and his father concerning what the son had learned in his education ...
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  33.  8
    Lia Formigari (1988). Language and Experience in 17th-Century British Philosophy. John Benjamins Pub. Co..
    The focus of this volume is the crisis of the traditional view of the relationship between words and things and the emergence of linguistic arbitrarism in 17th ...
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  34. James M. Edie (1987). Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Language: Structuralism and Dialectics. University Press of America.
  35. Lia Formigari (1993). Signs, Science, and Politics: Philosophies of Language in Europe, 1700-1830. J. Benjamins.
  36. Andreas Graeser (1999). Issues in the Philosophy of Language, Past and Present: Selected Papers. P. Lang.
  37. Jere Paul Surber (1996). Language and German Idealism: Fichte's Linguistic Philosophy. Humanities Press.
  38.  34
    Giorgio Agamben (1999). Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
    This volume constitutes the largest collection of writings by the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben hitherto published in any language and all but one appear in English for the first time. The essays consider figures in the history of philosophy (Plato, Plotinus, Spinoza, Hegel) and twentieth-century thought (Walter Benjamin, Heidegger, Derrida, Deleuze, the historian Aby Warburg, and the linguist J.-C. Milner). They also examine several central concerns of Agamben: the relation of linguistic and metaphysical categories; messianism in Islamic, Jewish, (...)
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  39. Siobhan Chapman (2008). Language and Empiricism: After the Vienna Circle. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book compares attitudes to empiricism in language study from mid-twentieth century philosophy of language and from present-day linguistics. It focuses on responses to the logical positivism of the Vienna Circle, particularly in the work of British philosopher J. L. Austin and the much less well-known work of Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess.
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  40.  6
    Thomas Seifrid (2005). The Word Made Self: Russian Writings on Language, 1860-1930. Cornell University Press.
    This book will have a lasting impact among readers who will be fascinated to discover the richness of this long-suppressed chapter in the history of Russian ...
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  41.  47
    Michael Losonsky (2006). Linguistic Turns in Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book traces the linguistic turns in the history of modern philosophy and the development of the philosophy of language from Locke to Wittgenstein. It examines the contributions of canonical figures such as Leibniz, Mill, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Austin, Quine, and Davidson, as well as those of Condillac, Humboldt, Chomsky, and Derrida. Michael Losonsky argues that the philosophy of language begins with Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding and demonstrates how the history of the philosophy of (...) in the modern period is marked by a split between formal and pragmatic perspectives on language, which modern philosophy has not been able to integrate. (shrink)
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  42.  15
    Matthew Lauzon (2010). Signs of Light: French and British Theories of Linguistic Communication, 1648-1789. Cornell University Press.
    Bestial banter -- Homo risus : making light of animal language -- Warming savage hearts and heating eloquent tongues -- From savage orators to savage languages -- French levity -- English energy.
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  43.  69
    E. J. Ashworth (1974). Language and Logic in the Post-Medieval Period. Reidel.
    HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION Although many of the details of the development of logic in the Middle Ages remain to be filled in, it is well known that between ...
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  44. Roy Harris (1980). The Language-Makers. Cornell University Press.
     
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  45. Richard Waswo (1987). Language and Meaning in the Renaissance. Princeton University Press.
     
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  46. Pierre Juliard (1970). Philosophies of Language in Eighteenth-Century France. The Hague,Mouton.
     
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  47. Edward Cell (1971). Language, Existence & God. Nashville,Abingdon Press.
     
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  48. Yuanzhen Huang (2010). Zhongguo Wai Yu Jiao Yu: Li Jie Yu Dui Hua: Sheng Tai Zhe Xue Shi Yu = China's Foreign Language Education:Understanding and Dialogue: From the Perspective of Ecological Philosophy. Fujian Jiao Yu Chu Ban She.
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  49. Kristian Jensen (1990). Rhetorical Philosophy and Philosophical Grammar: Julius Caesar Scaliger's Theory of Language. Fink.
     
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  50. Tomonori Matsushita, A. V. C. Schmidt & David Wallace (eds.) (2011). From Beowulf to Caxton: Studies in Medieval Languages and Literature, Texts and Manuscripts. Peter Lang.
     
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