Search results for 'Latent Inhibition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul Schnur & Charles J. Ksir (1969). Latent Inhibition in Human Eyelid Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (2p1):388.score: 150.0
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  2. Stephen M. McIntosh & Roger M. Tarpy (1977). Retention of Latent Inhibition in a Taste-Aversion Paradigm. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (6):411-412.score: 90.0
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  3. Phil Reed (1991). Blocking Latent Inhibition. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (4):292-294.score: 90.0
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  4. A. Ginton, G. Urca & R. E. Lubow (1975). The Effects of Preexposure to a Nonattended Stimulus on Subsequent Learning: Latent Inhibition in Adults. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (1):5-8.score: 90.0
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  5. Roger M. Tarpy & Stephen M. McIntosh (1977). Generalized Latent Inhibition in Taste-Aversion Learning. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (5):379-381.score: 90.0
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  6. Margaret E. Clarke & Ralph B. Hupka (1974). The Effects of Stimulus Duration and Frequency of Daily Preconditioning Stimulus Exposures on Latent Inhibition in Pavlovian Conditioning of the Rabbit Nictitating Membrane Response. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (4):225-228.score: 90.0
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  7. T. L. Devietti, D. S. Blair & S. J. Schleusner (1989). Latent Inhibition (Li) with One Preexposure Trial-Replication and Controls. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):492-492.score: 90.0
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  8. Terry L. DeVietti & Owen V. Barrett (1986). Latent Inhibition: No Effect of Intertrial Interval of the Preexposure Trials. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (6):453-455.score: 90.0
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  9. Chris Frith (1991). In What Context is Latent Inhibition Relevant to the Symptoms of Schizophrenia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):28-29.score: 90.0
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  10. Roberto Álvarez Gómez & Matías López Ramírez (1993). Latent Inhibition to a Compound Following Exposure to the Elements or the Compound. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (6):569-570.score: 90.0
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  11. Wc Gordon & Ms Weaver (1987). Contextual Control of Latent Inhibition. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):355-355.score: 90.0
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  12. R. E. Lubow, I. Weiner, A. Schlossberg & I. Baruch (1987). Latent Inhibition and Schizophrenia. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (6):464-467.score: 90.0
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  13. Zakaria Ouhaz, Saadia Ba-M'hamed & Bennis Mohamed (2013). Dopamine Manipulation Limited to Pre-Exposure Session is Sufficient to Modulate Latent Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
  14. Paul R. Solomon, A. Craig Lohr & John W. Moore (1974). Latent Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response: Summation Tests for Active Inhibition as a Function of Number of CS Preexposures. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (6):557-559.score: 90.0
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  15. Paul R. Solomon, George Brennan & John W. Moore (1974). Latent Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response as a Function of CS Intensity. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (5):445-448.score: 90.0
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  16. Rm Tarpy, Dj Prybock & Je Roberts (1992). Latent Inhibition for Responding. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):439-439.score: 90.0
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  17. Daniel K. Tranberg & Mark Rilling (1978). Latent Inhibition in the Autoshaping Paradigm. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (5):273-276.score: 90.0
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  18. Timothy K. Wittman & Terry L. DeVietti (1981). Latent Inhibition Measured by Heart Rate Suppression in Rats. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (6):283-285.score: 90.0
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  19. Dennis C. Wright, Karl D. Skala & Karl A. Peuser (1986). Latent Inhibition From Context-Dependent Retrieval of Conflicting Information. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (2):152-154.score: 90.0
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  20. Dennis C. Wright & Karen K. Gustavson (1986). Preexposure of the Conditioning Context and Latent Inhibition From Reduced Conditioning. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (6):451-452.score: 90.0
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  21. Martin Eimer & Friederike Schlaghecken (2002). Links Between Conscious Awareness and Response Inhibition: Evidence From Masked Priming. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (3):514-520.score: 78.0
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  22. David Guez (2009). A Bio-Logical Theory of Animal Learning. Biological Theory 4 (2):148-158.score: 66.0
    This article provides the foundation for a new predictive theory of animal learning that is based upon a simple logical model. The knowledge of experimental subjects at a given time is described using logical equations. These logical equations are then used to predict a subject’s response when presented with a known or a previously unknown situation. This new theory suc- cessfully anticipates phenomena that existing theories predict, as well as phenomena that they cannot. It provides a theoretical account for phenomena (...)
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  23. Tiago V. Maia (2009). Fear Conditioning and Social Groups: Statistics, Not Genetics. Cognitive Science 33 (7):1232-1251.score: 60.0
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  24. Rolf Verleger, Piotr Jaskowski, Aytaç Aydemir, Rob H. J. van der Lubbe & Margriet Groen (2004). Qualitative Differences Between Conscious and Nonconscious Processing? On Inverse Priming Induced by Masked Arrows. Journal of Experimental Psychology 133 (4):494-515.score: 60.0
  25. Matthew Hugh Erdelyi (2006). The Unified Theory of Repression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):499-511.score: 36.0
    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). “Repression” was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. (...)
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  26. Wändi Bruine de Bruin, Timo Mäntylä & Fabio Del Missier (2011). Executive Functions in Decision Making: An Individual Differences Approach. Thinking and Reasoning 16 (2):69-97.score: 24.0
    This individual differences study examined the relationships between three executive functions (updating, shifting, and inhibition), measured as latent variables, and performance on two cognitively demanding subtests of the Adult Decision Making Competence battery: Applying Decision Rules and Consistency in Risk Perception. Structural equation modelling showed that executive functions contribute differentially to performance in these two tasks, with Applying Decision Rules being mainly related to inhibition and Consistency in Risk Perception mainly associated to shifting. The results suggest that (...)
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  27. Till D. Frank, Julia J. C. Blau & Michael T. Turvey (2012). Symmetry Breaking Analysis of Prism Adaptation's Latent Aftereffect. Cognitive Science 36 (4):674-697.score: 18.0
    The effect of prism adaptation on movement is typically reduced when the movement at test (prisms off) differs on some dimension from the movement at training (prisms on). Some adaptation is latent, however, and only revealed through further testing in which the movement at training is fully reinstated. Applying a nonlinear attractor dynamic model (Frank, Blau, & Turvey, 2009) to available data (Blau, Stephen, Carello, & Turvey, 2009), we provide evidence for a causal link between the latent (or (...)
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  28. John M. Findlay & Robin Walker (1999). A Model of Saccade Generation Based on Parallel Processing and Competitive Inhibition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):661-674.score: 18.0
    During active vision, the eyes continually scan the visual environment using saccadic scanning movements. This target article presents an information processing model for the control of these movements, with some close parallels to established physiological processes in the oculomotor system. Two separate pathways are concerned with the spatial and the temporal programming of the movement. In the temporal pathway there is spatially distributed coding and the saccade target is selected from a Both pathways descend through a hierarchy of levels, the (...)
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  29. Ariane Bazan (2012). From Sensorimotor Inhibition to Freudian Repression: Insights From Psychosis Applied to Neurosis. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    First, three case studies are presented of psychotic patients having in common an inability to hold something down or out. In line with other theories on psychosis, we propose that a key change is at the efference copy system. Going back to Freud’s mental apparatus, we propose that the messages of discharge of the motor neurones, mobilised to direct perception, also called “indications of reality”, are equivalent to the modern efference copies. With this key, the reading of the cases is (...)
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  30. Isabella Fuchs & Ulrich Ansorge (2012). Inhibition of Return is No Hallmark of Exogenous Capture by Unconscious Cues. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Inhibition of irrelevant information and response tendencies is a central characteristic of conscious control and executive functions. However, recent theories in vision considered Inhibition of Return (IOR: slower responses to attended than unattended positions) to be a hallmark of automatic exogenous capture of visual attention by unconscious cues. In the present study, we show that an unconscious cue that exogenously captures attention does not lead to IOR. First of all, subliminal cues with a contrast different from a searched-for (...)
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  31. Randall O'Reilly Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory (...)
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  32. Diego Redolar-Ripoll Ignacio Obeso, Noemí Robles, Elena M. Marrón (2013). Dissociating the Role of the Pre-SMA in Response Inhibition and Switching: A Combined Online and Offline TMS Approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    The pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) is considered to be a key node in the cognitive control of actions that require rapid updating, inhibition or switching, as well as working memory. It is now recognized that the pre-SMA is part of a ‘cognitive control’ network involving the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and subcortical regions, such as the striatum and subthalamic nucleus. However, two important questions remain to be addressed. First, it is not clear if the main role of the pre-SMA (...)
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  33. Ulrich Ansorge Isabella Fuchs (2012). Inhibition of Return is No Hallmark of Exogenous Capture by Unconscious Cues. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Inhibition of irrelevant information and response tendencies is a central characteristic of conscious control and executive functions. However, recent theories in vision considered Inhibition of Return (IOR: slower responses to attended than unattended positions) to be a hallmark of automatic exogenous capture of visual attention by unconscious cues. In the present study, we show that an unconscious cue that exogenously captures attention does not lead to IOR. First of all, subliminal cues with a contrast different from a searched-for (...)
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  34. Christian Grillon Oliver J. Robinson, Marissa Krimsky (2013). The Impact of Induced Anxiety on Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Anxiety has wide reaching effects on cognition; evidenced most prominently by the ‘difficulties concentrating’ seen in anxiety disorders, and by adaptive harm-avoidant behaviors adopted under threatening circumstances. Despite having critical implications for daily-living, the precise impact of anxiety on cognition is as yet poorly quantified. Here we attempt to clarify the impact of anxiety on sustained attention and response inhibition via a translational anxiety induction in healthy individuals (N=22). Specifically, in a within-subjects design, participants completed the Sustained Attention to (...)
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  35. Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos, Sara Jahfari, Vanessa A. van Ast, Merel Kindt & Birte U. Forstmann (2011). Individual Differences in Heart Rate Variability Predict the Degree of Slowing During Response Inhibition and Initiation in the Presence of Emotional Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    Response inhibition is a hallmark of executive control and crucial to support flexible behaviour in a constantly changing environment. Recently, it has been shown that response inhibition is influenced by the presentation of emotional stimuli (Verbruggen and De Houwer, 2007). Healthy individuals typically differ in the degree to which they are able to regulate their emotional state, but it remains unknown whether individual differences in emotion regulation (ER) may alter the interplay between emotion and response inhibition. Here (...)
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  36. Joaquin A. Anguera, Kyle Lyman, Theodore P. Zanto, Jacob Bollinger & Adam Gazzaley (2013). Reconciling the Influence of Task-Set Switching and Motor Inhibition Processes on Stop Signal After-Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Executive response functions can be affected by preceding events, even if they are no longer associated with the current task at hand. For example, studies utilizing the stop signal task have reported slower response times to ‘GO’ stimuli when the preceding trial involved the presentation of a ‘STOP’ signal. However, the neural mechanisms that underlie this behavioral after-effect are unclear. To address this, behavioral and electroencephalography (EEG) measures were examined in 18 young adults (18-30yrs) on 'GO' trials following a previously (...)
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  37. Mark J. Fenske Anne E. Ferrey, Alexandra Frischen (2012). Hot or Not: Response Inhibition Reduces the Hedonic Value and Motivational Incentive of Sexual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    The motivational incentive of reward-related stimuli can become so salient that it drives behavior at the cost of other needs. Here we show that response inhibition applied during a Go/No-go task not only impacts hedonic evaluations but also reduces the behavioral incentive of motivationally-relevant stimuli. We first examined the impact of response inhibition on the hedonic value of sex stimuli associated with strong behavioral-approach responses (Experiment 1). Sexually-appealing and non-appealing images were both rated as less attractive when previously (...)
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  38. Roi Cohen Kadosh Beatrix Krause, Javier Márquez-Ruiz (2013). The Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A Role for Cortical Excitation/Inhibition Balance? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising tool for cognitive enhancement and neurorehabilitation in clinical disorders in both cognitive and clinical domains (e.g., chronic pain, tinnitus). Here we suggest the potential role of tDCS in modulating cortical excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance and thereby inducing improvements. We suggest that part of the mechanism of action of tDCS can be explained by non-invasive modulations of the E/I balance.
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  39. Chaomei Chen (1997). Tracking Latent Domain Structures: An Integration of Pathfinder and Latent Semantic Analysis. [REVIEW] AI and Society 11 (1-2):48-62.score: 18.0
    Standard psychological scaling methods have been widely used as knowledge elicitation tools to uncover structural characteristics of a given domain. However, these methods traditionally rely on relatedness ratings from human experts, which is often time-consuming and tedious. We describe an integrated approach to knowledge elicitation and representation using Latent Semantic Analysis and Pathfinder Network Scaling techniques. The semantic structure of a subject domain can be automatically characterised from a collection of published documents in the domain. The method is illustrated (...)
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  40. Aymeric Guillot, Franck Di Rienzo, Tadhg MacIntyre, Aidan Moran & Christian Collet (2012). Imagining is Not Doing but Involves Specific Motor Commands: A Review of Experimental Data Related to Motor Inhibition. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI) and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which are blocked at (...)
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  41. Martin Eimer Monika Kiss, Jane E. Raymond, Nikki Westoby, Anna C. Nobre (2008). Response Inhibition is Linked to Emotional Devaluation: Behavioural and Electrophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 18.0
    To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of response (...) in the Go-Nogo task and subsequent emotional evaluations, the Nogo N2 component was quantified separately for faces that were later judged to be high versus low in trustworthiness. Nogo N2 amplitudes were larger in response to low-rated as compared to high-rated faces, demonstrating that trial-by-trial variations in the efficiency of response inhibition triggered by Nogo faces, as measured by the Nogo N2 component, co-vary with their subsequent affective evaluation. These results suggest close links between inhibitory processes in top-down motor control and emotional responses. (shrink)
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  42. Margot A. Schel & Eveline A. Crone (2013). Development of Response Inhibition in the Context of Relevant Versus Irrelevant Emotions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    The present study examined the influence of relevant and irrelevant emotions on response inhibition from childhood to early adulthood. Ninety-four participants between 6 and 25 years of age performed two go/nogo tasks with emotional faces (neutral, happy, and fearful) as stimuli. In one go/nogo task emotion formed a relevant dimension of the task and in the other go/nogo task emotion was irrelevant and participants had to respond to the color of the faces instead. A special feature of the latter (...)
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  43. Mark A. Schneider & Lewellyn Hendrix (2000). Olfactory Sexual Inhibition and the Westermarck Effect. Human Nature 11 (1):65-91.score: 18.0
    The Westermarck effect (sexual inhibition among individuals raised together) is argued to be mediated olfactorily. Various animals, including humans, distinguish among individuals by scent (significantly determined by MHC genotype), and some avoid cosocialized associates on this basis. Possible models of olfactory mechanisms in humans are evaluated. Evidence suggests aversions develop during an early sensitizing period, attach to persons as much as to their scents, and are more powerful among females than among males. Adult to child aversions may develop similarly, (...)
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  44. Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus & Randall O'Reilly (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory (...)
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  45. Gabriela Garrido Rodriguez Ardi Roelofs, Vitória Piai (2011). Attentional Inhibition in Bilingual Naming Performance: Evidence From Delta-Plot Analyses. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    It has been argued that inhibition is a mechanism of attentional control in bilingual language performance. Evidence suggests that effects of inhibition are largest in the tail of a response time (RT) distribution in non-linguistic and monolingual performance domains. We examined this for bilingual performance by conducting delta-plot analyses of naming RTs. Dutch-English bilingual speakers named pictures using English while trying to ignore superimposed neutral Xs or Dutch distractor words that were semantically related, unrelated, or translations. The mean (...)
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  46. Christian Collet Aymeric Guillot, Franck Di Rienzo, Tadhg MacIntyre, Aidan Moran (2012). Imagining is Not Doing but Involves Specific Motor Commands: A Review of Experimental Data Related to Motor Inhibition. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    There is now compelling evidence that motor imagery (MI) and actual movement share common neural substrate. However, the question of how MI inhibits the transmission of motor commands into the efferent pathways in order to prevent any movement is largely unresolved. Similarly, little is known about the nature of the electromyographic activity that is apparent during MI. In addressing these gaps in the literature, the present paper argues that MI includes motor execution commands for muscle contractions which are blocked at (...)
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  47. Jessica R. Cohen, Robert F. Asarnow, Fred W. Sabb, Robert M. Bilder, Susan Y. Bookheimer, Barbara J. Knowlton & Russell A. Poldrack (2010). Decoding Developmental Differences and Individual Variability in Response Inhibition Through Predictive Analyses Across Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 18.0
    Response inhibition is thought to improve throughout childhood and into adulthood. Despite the relationship between age and the ability to stop ongoing behavior, questions remain regarding whether these age-related changes reflect improvements in response inhibition or in other factors that contribute to response performance variability. Functional neuroimaging data shows age-related changes in neural activity during response inhibition. While traditional methods of exploring neuroimaging data are limited to determining correlational relationships, newer methods can determine predictability and can begin (...)
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  48. Emil N. Coman, Katherine Picho, John J. McArdle, Victor Villagra, Lisa Dierker & Eugen Iordache (2013). The Paired T-Test as a Simple Latent Change Score Model. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    The paired t-test as a simple latent change score model.
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  49. Eliza Congdon, Jeanette A. Mumford, Jessica R. Cohen, Adriana Galvan, Turhan Canli & Russell A. Poldrack (2012). Measurement and Reliability of Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Response inhibition plays a critical role in adaptive functioning and can be assessed with the Stop-signal task, which requires participants to suppress prepotent motor responses. Evidence suggests that this ability to inhibit a motor response that has already been initiated (reflected as Stop-signal reaction time (SSRT)) is a quantitative and heritable measure of interindividual variation in brain function. In order to examine the reliability of this measure, we pooled data across three separate studies and examined the influence of multiple (...)
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  50. Anne E. Ferrey, Alexandra Frischen & Mark J. Fenske (2012). Hot or Not: Response Inhibition Reduces the Hedonic Value and Motivational Incentive of Sexual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    The motivational incentive of reward-related stimuli can become so salient that it drives behavior at the cost of other needs. Here we show that response inhibition applied during a Go/No-go task not only impacts hedonic evaluations but also reduces the behavioral incentive of motivationally-relevant stimuli. We first examined the impact of response inhibition on the hedonic value of sex stimuli associated with strong behavioral-approach responses (Experiment 1). Sexually-appealing and non-appealing images were both rated as less attractive when previously (...)
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