Search results for 'Lateral Dominance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. T. Raney (1938). Reversed Lateral Dominance in Identical Twins. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (3):304.score: 210.0
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  2. E. T. Raney (1939). Brain Potentials and Lateral Dominance in Identical Twins. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (1):21.score: 210.0
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  3. Howard B. Orenstein & Walter B. Meighan (1976). Recognition of Bilaterally Presented Words Varying in Concreteness and Frequency: Lateral Dominance or Sequential Processing? Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (2):179-180.score: 150.0
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  4. Joseph Sirosh & Risto Miikkulainen (1996). Lateral Connections In The Visual Cortex Can Self-Organize Cooperatively With Multisize RFs Just As With Ocular Dominance and Orientation Columns. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 18--430.score: 120.0
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  5. B. Cucchiara, S. E. Kasner, D. A. Wolk, P. D. Lyden, V. A. Knappertz, T. Ashwood, T. Odergren & A. Nordlund (2003). Lack of Hemispheric Dominance for Consciousness in Acute Ischaemic Stroke. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 74 (7):889-892.score: 90.0
  6. Elizabeth K. Taitano, Individual Differences in Emotional Awareness and the Lateralized Processing of Emotion.score: 70.0
  7. Christopher L. Niebauer, Justin Aselage & Christian Schutte (2002). Hemispheric Interaction and Consciousness: Degree of Handedness Predicts the Intensity of a Sensory Illusion. Laterality 7 (1):85-96.score: 62.0
  8. Guido Gainotti (2005). Emotions, Unconscious Processes, and the Right Hemisphere. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 7 (1):71-81.score: 60.0
  9. Lucina Q. Uddin, Jan Rayman & Eran Zaidel (2005). Split-Brain Reveals Separate but Equal Self-Recognition in the Two Cerebral Hemispheres. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):633-640.score: 60.0
  10. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.score: 60.0
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the (...)
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  11. Jillian H. Fecteau, Alan Kingstone & James T. Enns (2004). Hemisphere Differences in Conscious and Unconscious Word Reading. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):550-64.score: 60.0
  12. Stephen D. Smith & M. Barbara Bulman-Fleming (2004). A Hemispheric Asymmetry for the Unconscious Perception of Emotion. Brain and Cognition 55 (3):452-457.score: 60.0
  13. Martin Eimer, Angelo Maravita, Jose Van Velzen, Masud Husain & Jon Driver (2002). The Electrophysiology of Tactile Extinction: ERP Correlates of Unconscious Somatosensory Processing. Neuropsychologia 40 (13):2438-2447.score: 60.0
  14. Iraj Derakhshan (2003). The Preservation of Consciousness, Automatism, and Movement Control. Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 15 (4):456.score: 60.0
  15. C. Marzi, M. Girelli, Carlo Miniussi, N. Smania & Angelo Maravita (2000). Electrophysiological Correlates of Conscious Vision: Evidence From Unilateral Extinction. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 12 (5):869-877.score: 60.0
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  16. Elzbieta Szelag, Krystyna Rymarczyk & Ernst Poppel (2001). Conscious Control of Movements: Increase of Temporal Precision in Voluntarily Delayed Actions. Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis 61 (3):175-179.score: 60.0
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  17. Michael S. Gazzaniga & Melvin E. Miller (2000). Testing Tulving: The Split Brain Approach. In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.score: 60.0
  18. Stephen Jackson (2000). Perception, Awareness and Action: Insights From Blindsight. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 60.0
  19. Robert K. Kretz (2000). The Evolution of Self-Awareness: Advances in Neurological Understandings Since Julian Jaynes' "Bicameral Mind&Quot;. Dissertation Abstracts International 60.score: 60.0
  20. Stephen D. Smith, Hemispheric Specialization for the Conscious and Unconscious Perception of Emotional Stimuli.score: 60.0
  21. Hugo Théoret, Masahito Kobayashi, Lotfi Merabet, Tim Wagner, Jose M. Tormos & Alvaro Pascual-Leone (2004). Modulation of Right Motor Cortex Excitability Without Awareness Following Presentation of Masked Self-Images. Cognitive Brain Research 20 (1):54-57.score: 60.0
     
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  22. Rolf Verleger (2001). Comment on Electrophysiological Correlates of Conscious Vision: Evidence From Unilateral Extinction by Marzi, Girelli, Miniussi, Smania, and Maravita, in JOCN 12:. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 13 (3):416-417.score: 60.0
     
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  23. Theofanis I. Panagiotaropoulos, Vishal Kapoor & Nikos K. Logothetis (2013). Desynchronization and Rebound of Beta Oscillations During Conscious and Unconscious Local Neuronal Processing in the Macaque Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    Accumulating evidence indicates that control mechanisms are not tightly bound to conscious perception since both conscious and unconscious information can trigger control processes, probably through the activation of higher-order association areas like the prefrontal cortex. Studying the modulation of control-related prefrontal signals in a microscopic, neuronal level during conscious and unconscious neuronal processing and under control-free conditions could provide an elementary understanding of these interactions. Here we performed extracellular electrophysiological recordings in the macaque lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) during monocular (...)
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  24. Norman D. Cook (2003). Hemispheric Dominance has its Origins in the Control of the Midline Organs of Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):216-217.score: 54.0
    Unlike all other lateral specializations, the necessity for unilateral dominance is clear only for the case of the motor control of the speech organs lying on the midline of the body and innervated from both hemispheres. All functional asymmetries are likely to be a consequence of this asymmetry of executive control.
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  25. Gina Geffen (1978). Human Laterality: Cerebral Dominance and Handedness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):295.score: 50.0
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  26. Sharon Coleman & Robert Zenhausern (1979). Processing Speed, Laterality Patterns, and Memory Encoding as a Function of Hemispheric Dominance. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 14 (5):357-360.score: 50.0
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  27. J. R. Knott & T. D. Tjossem (1943). Bilateral Electroencephalograms From Normal Speakers and Stutterers. Journal of Experimental Psychology 32 (4):357.score: 48.0
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  28. Mike Brügger, Dominik A. Ettlin, Michael Meier, Thierry Keller, Roger Luechinger, Ashley Barlow, Sandro Palla, Lutz Jäncke & Kai Lutz (2011). Taking Sides with Pain – Lateralization Aspects Related to Cerebral Processing of Dental Pain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 32.0
    The current fMRI study investigated cortical processing of electrically induced painful tooth stimulation of both maxillary canines and central incisors in 21 healthy, right handed volunteers. A constant current, 150% above tooth specific pain-perception thresholds was applied and corresponding online ratings of perceived pain intensity were recorded with a computerized visual analog scale during fMRI measurements. Lateralization of cortical activations was investigated by a region of interest analysis. A wide cortical network distributed over several areas, typically described as the pain (...)
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  29. Michael C. Corballis & Michael J. Morgan (1978). On the Biological Basis of Human Laterality: I. Evidence for a Maturational Left–Right Gradient. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):261.score: 30.0
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  30. Peter Lundgreen (1990). Engineering Education in Europe and the U.S.A., 1750–1930: The Rise to Dominance of School Culture and the Engineering Professions. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 47 (1):33-75.score: 30.0
    Summary The rise to dominance of school culture in engineering education took place much later in England and the U.S.A. than in France or Germany. Why? This comparative essay argues that explanations are to be sought within the context of bureaucracy rather than in that of industrialization. The academic training of state engineers set a powerful role model in Continental Europe but was absent in Anglo-America. Consequently, the academic training of engineers for the private sector of the economy started (...)
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  31. Lorraine McCune (1998). Frame Dominance: A Developmental Phenomenon? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):522-523.score: 30.0
    Developmental aspects of the frame/content perspective are explored in relation to (1) transitions in early language acquisition, (2) possible differential neurological control for babbling and early and later speech, and (3) development of word production templates in precocious early speakers. Proportionally high frequency of bilabial stops in early stable words versus babble offers advantages for afferent monitoring and supporting “frame dominance.”.
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  32. Michael J. Morgan & Michael C. Corballis (1978). On the Biological Basis of Human Laterality: II. The Mechanisms of Inheritance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):270.score: 30.0
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  33. Victor H. Denenberg (1981). Hemispheric Laterality in Animals and the Effects of Early Experience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):1.score: 30.0
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  34. John S. Wilkins, Gods Above: Naturalizing Religion in Terms of Our Shared Ape Social Dominance Behavior.score: 24.0
    To naturalize religion we must identify what religion is, and what aspects of it we are trying to explain. In this paper religious social institutional behavior is the explanatory target, and an explanatory hypothesis based on shared primate social dominance psychology is given. The argument is that various religious features, including the high status afforded the religious, and the high status afforded to deities, is an expression of this social dominance psychology in a context for which it did (...)
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  35. Allan Mazur & Alan Booth (1998). Testosterone and Dominance in Men. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):353-363.score: 24.0
    In men, high levels of endogenous testosterone (T) seem to encourage behavior intended to dominate other people. Sometimes dominant behavior is aggressive, its apparent intent being to inflict harm on another person, but often dominance is expressed nonaggressively. Sometimes dominant behavior takes the form of antisocial behavior, including rebellion against authority and law breaking. Measurement of T at a single point in time, presumably indicative of a man's basal T level, predicts many of these dominant or antisocial behaviors. T (...)
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  36. Anya Plutynski (2008). Explaining How and Explaining Why: Developmental and Evolutionary Explanations of Dominance. Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):363-381.score: 24.0
    There have been two different schools of thought on the evolution of dominance. On the one hand, followers of Wright [Wright S. 1929. Am. Nat. 63: 274–279, Evolution: Selected Papers by Sewall Wright, University of Chicago Press, Chicago; 1934. Am. Nat. 68: 25–53, Evolution: Selected Papers by Sewall Wright, University of Chicago Press, Chicago; Haldane J.B.S. 1930. Am. Nat. 64: 87–90; 1939. J. Genet. 37: 365–374; Kacser H. and Burns J.A. 1981. Genetics 97: 639–666] have defended the view that (...)
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  37. Denise Dellarosa Cummins (1996). Dominance Hierarchies and the Evolution of Human Reasoning. Minds and Machines 6 (4):463-480.score: 24.0
    Research from ethology and evolutionary biology indicates the following about the evolution of reasoning capacity. First, solving problems of social competition and cooperation have direct impact on survival rates and reproductive success. Second, the social structure that evolved from this pressure is the dominance hierarchy. Third, primates that live in large groups with complex dominance hierarchies also show greater neocortical development, and concomitantly greater cognitive capacity. These facts suggest that the necessity of reasoning effectively about dominance hierarchies (...)
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  38. Yi-Hui Huang & Shih-Hsin Su (2009). Public Relations Autonomy, Legal Dominance, and Strategic Orientation as Predictors of Crisis Communicative Strategies. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):29 - 41.score: 24.0
    This article investigates the factors affecting how public relations autonomy, legal dominance, and strategic orientation affect crisis communicative response in corporate contexts. Communication managers, crisis managers, public affairs managers, and/or public relations managers were solicited from Taiwan’s top 500 companies to participate in a survey. The results revealed that, in contrast to public relations autonomy being the strongest and sole predictor of concession strategy, legal dominance could predict defensive and diversionary responses in crisis events. The article concludes with (...)
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  39. Nadine Le Forestier (2011). Normalities Are Not the Only Answer for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients. Medicine Studies 3 (2):71-81.score: 24.0
    Because our actions change, our responsibility is modified; because our responsibility is modified, we need to question the ethics of the action. Our action is situated right there between announcing a diagnosis, the theoretical and practical result of identification, the determining and naming of a fact and voicing the disease which is a human action where medical and technical expertise comes up against a life and its story. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a degenerative disease (...)
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  40. Mahdi Muhammad Moosa & S. M. Minhaz Ud-Dean (2011). The Role of Dominance Hierarchy in the Evolution of Social Species. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):203-208.score: 24.0
    A number of animal species from different lineages live socially. One of the features of social living is the formation of dominance hierarchy. Despite its obvious benefit in the survival probability of the species, the hierarchical structureitself poses psychological and physiological burden leading to the chronic activation of stress related pathways. Considering these apparently conflicting observations, here we propose that social hierarchy can act as a selective force in the evolution of social species. We also discuss its role on (...)
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  41. Douglas Allchin (2005). The Dilemma of Dominance. Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):427-451.score: 24.0
    The concept of dominance poses several dilemmas. First, while entrenched in genetics education, the metaphor of dominance promotes several misconceptions and misleading cultural perspectives. Second, the metaphors of power, prevalence and competition extend into science, shaping assumptions and default concepts. Third, because genetic causality is complex, the simplified concepts of dominance found in practice are highly contingent or inconsistent. The conceptual problems are illustrated in the history of studies on the evolution of dominance. Conceptual clarity may (...)
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  42. Andrew M. Colman & Michael Bacharach (1997). Payoff Dominance and the Stackelberg Heuristic. Theory and Decision 43 (1):1-19.score: 24.0
    Payoff dominance, a criterion for choosing between equilibrium points in games, is intuitively compelling, especially in matching games and other games of common interests, but it has not been justified from standard game-theoretic rationality assumptions. A psychological explanation of it is offered in terms of a form of reasoning that we call the Stackelberg heuristic in which players assume that their strategic thinking will be anticipated by their co-player(s). Two-person games are called Stackelberg-soluble if the players' strategies that maximize (...)
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  43. Thierry Magnac & Jean-Marc Robin (1999). Dynamic Stochastic Dominance in Bandit Decision Problems. Theory and Decision 47 (3):267-295.score: 24.0
    The aim of this paper is to study the monotonicity properties with respect to the probability distribution of the state processes, of optimal decisions in bandit decision problems. Orderings of dynamic discrete projects are provided by extending the notion of stochastic dominance to stochastic processes.
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  44. Emiliano Lorini (2013). On the Epistemic Foundation for Iterated Weak Dominance: An Analysis in a Logic of Individual and Collective Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (6):863-904.score: 24.0
    This paper proposes a logical framework for representing static and dynamic properties of different kinds of individual and collective attitudes. A complete axiomatization as well as a decidability result for the logic are given. The logic is applied to game theory by providing a formal analysis of the epistemic conditions of iterated deletion of weakly dominated strategies (IDWDS), or iterated weak dominance for short. The main difference between the analysis of the epistemic conditions of iterated weak dominance given (...)
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  45. Lucas Champollion (2011). Lexicalized Non-Local MCTAG with Dominance Links is NP-Complete. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20 (3):343-359.score: 24.0
    An NP-hardness proof for non-local Multicomponent Tree Adjoining Grammar (MCTAG) by Rambow and Satta (1st International Workshop on Tree Adjoining Grammers 1992 ), based on Dahlhaus and Warmuth (in J Comput Syst Sci 33:456–472, 1986 ), is extended to some linguistically relevant restrictions of that formalism. It is found that there are NP-hard grammars among non-local MCTAGs even if any or all of the following restrictions are imposed: (i) lexicalization: every tree in the grammar contains a terminal; (ii) dominance (...)
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  46. Udo Ebert (2010). Dominance Criteria for Welfare Comparisons: Using Equivalent Income to Describe Differences in Needs. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 69 (1):55-67.score: 24.0
    The article demonstrates that the dominance approach—often used for the measurement of welfare in a population in which there are different household types (see e.g., Atkinson and Bourguignon, Arrow and the foundations of the theory of economic policy, 350–370, 1987)—can be based on explicit value judgments on the households’ living standard. We define living standard by equivalent income (functions) and consider classes of inequality averse social welfare functions: Welfare increases if the inequality of living standard is decreased. In this (...)
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  47. Mark W. Greenlee, Gyula Kovács & Krisztina Nagy (2012). The Lateral Occipital Cortex in the Face Perception Network: An Effective Connectivity Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    The perception of faces involves a large network of cortical areas of the human brain. While several studies tested this network recently, its relationship to the lateral occipital (LO) cortex known to be involved in visual object perception remains largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to test the effective connectivity among the major areas of the face-processing core network and LO. Specifically, we tested how LO is connected to the fusiform face area (...)
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  48. Frank Julius Meye, Salvatore Lecca, Kristina Valentinova & Manuel Mameli (2013). Synaptic and Cellular Profile of Neurons in the Lateral Habenula. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:860.score: 24.0
    The lateral habenula (LHb) is emerging as a crucial structure capable of conveying rewarding and aversive information. Recent evidence indicates that a rapid increase in the activity of LHb neurons drives negative states and avoidance. Furthermore, the hyperexcitability of neurons in the lateral habenula, especially those projecting to the midbrain, may represent an important cellular correlate for neuropsychiatric disorders like depression and drug addiction. Despite the recent insights regarding the implications of the LHb in the context of reward (...)
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  49. Yutaka Sato, Koichi Mori, Toshizo Koizumi, Yasuyo Minagawa-Kawai, Akihiro Tanaka, Emi Ozawa, Yoko Wakaba & Reiko Mazuka (2011). Functional Lateralization of Speech Processing in Adults and Children Who Stutter. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder in fluency characterized by repetitions, prolongations and silent blocks, especially in the initial parts of utterances. Although their symptoms are motor related, people who stutter show abnormal patterns of cerebral hemispheric dominance in both anterior and posterior language areas. It is unknown whether the abnormal functional lateralization in the posterior language area starts during childhood or emerges as a consequence of many years of stuttering. In order to address this issue, we measured the (...)
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  50. Jan Bennemann, Claudia Freigang, Erich Schröger, Rudolf Rübsamen & Nicole Richter (2013). Resolution of Lateral Acoustic Space Assessed by Electroencephalography and Psychoacoustics. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    The encoding of auditory spatial acuity (measured as the precision to distinguish between two spatially distinct stimuli) by neural circuits in both auditory cortices is a matter of ongoing research. Here, the event-related potential mismatch negativity (MMN), a sensitive indicator of preattentive auditory change detection, was used to tap into the underlying mechanism of cortical representation of auditory spatial information. We characterized the MMN response affected by the degree of spatial deviance in lateral acoustic space using a passive oddball (...)
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