Search results for 'Laura A. Flurry' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Krist Swimberghe, Laura A. Flurry & Janna M. Parker (2011). Consumer Religiosity: Consequences for Consumer Activism in the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):453-467.score: 960.0
    In recent times, organizations have experienced consumer backlash as a result of decisions to support controversial causes. To date, little research has attempted to explain consumers’ negative response as a function of religion. This study addresses that gap in the literature and examines consumer religious commitment and Christian consumers’ conservative beliefs in the United States as motivating factors for consumer activist behavior and boycott participation. Findings from a national sample of 531 consumers suggest that consumers evaluate seller’s actions and form (...)
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  2. Krist R. Swimberghe, Dheeraj Sharma & Laura Willis Flurry (2011). Does a Consumer's Religion Really Matter in the Buyer–Seller Dyad? An Empirical Study Examining the Relationship Between Consumer Religious Commitment, Christian Conservatism and the Ethical Judgment of a Seller's Controversial Business Decision. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):581-598.score: 900.0
    Religion is an important cultural and individual difference variable. Yet, despite its obvious importance in consumers’ lives, religion in the United States has been under-researched. This study addresses that gap in the literature and investigates the influence of consumer religion in the buyer–seller dyad. Specifically, this study examines the influence of consumer religious commitment and a Christian consumer’s conservative beliefs in the United States on store loyalty when retailers make business decisions which are potentially reli- gious objectionable. This study uses (...)
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  3. C. S. R. Responsibility Beyond (2011). Australian Socially Responsible Funds: Performance, Risk and Screening Intensity Pp. 519-535 Downloads Jacquelyn Humphrey and Darren Lee Abuse of Ministerial Authority, Systemic Perjury, and Obstruction of Justice: Corruption in the Shadows of Organizational Practice Pp. 537-562 Downloads Seraphim Voliotis Leadership Centrality and Corporate Social Ir-Responsibility (CSIR): The Potential Ameliorating Effects of Self and Shared Leadership on CSIR Pp. 563-579 Downloads Craig Pearce and Charles Manz Does a Consumer's Religion Really Matter in the Buyer–Seller Dyad? An Empirical Study Examining the Relationship Between Consumer Religious Commitment, Christian Conservatism and the Ethical Judgment of a Seller's Controversial Business Decision Pp. 581-598 Downloads Krist Swimberghe, Dheeraj Sharma and Laura Flurry Convergence Versus Divergence of CSR in Developing Countries: An Embedded Multi-Layered Institutional Lens Pp. 599-621 Downloads Dima Jamali and Ben Neville. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (1).score: 405.0
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  4. Michelle K. Bolduc & David A. Frank (2010). Chaïm Perelman and Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca's "On Temporality as a Characteristic of Argumentation":On Temporality as a Characteristic of Argumentation Commentary and Translation. Philosophy and Rhetoric 43 (4):308-315.score: 64.0
    "The last third of the twentieth century," Gerard Hauser writes, was marked by "a flurry of intellectual work aimed at theorizing rhetoric in new terms" (2001, 1). The year 1958 was key in this flurry, with five major works appearing on a rhetorically inflected philosophy and theory of argumentation: Hannah Arendt's The Human Condition (on the relationship between the vita contemplativa and vita activa); Michael Polanyi's Personal Knowledge (on the role of tacit knowledge, emotion, and commitment in science); (...)
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  5. Isaac Linder (2013). Stage Notes and/as/or Track Changes: Introductory Remarks and Magical Thinking on Printing: An Election and a Provocation. Continent 2 (4):244-247.score: 58.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  6. Derek R. Ford (forthcoming). A Figural Education with Lyotard. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-12.score: 58.0
    While there was a flurry of articles throughout the 1990s in philosophy of education on Lyotard, there are still several key concepts in his oeuvre that have import for but remain largely underdeveloped or absent in the field. One of the most interesting of these absent concepts is Lyotard’s notion of the figural. In this paper, I take the figural as an educational problematic and ask what new educational insights it can generate in regard to the existing literature. As (...)
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  7. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.) (2010). Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. OUP USA.score: 58.0
    We all seem to think that we do the acts we do because we consciously choose to do them. This commonsense view is thrown into dispute by Benjamin Libet's eyebrow-raising experiments, which seem to suggest that conscious will occurs not before but after the start of brain activity that produces physical action. Libet's striking results are often claimed to undermine traditional views of free will and moral responsibility and to have practical implications for criminal justice. His work has also stimulated (...)
     
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  8. Patrick Suppes (1979). Logical Inference in English: A Preliminary Analysis. Studia Logica 38 (4):375 - 391.score: 54.0
    The perfect fit of syntactic derivability and logical consequence in first-order logic is one of the most celebrated facts of modern logic. In the present flurry of attention given to the semantics of natural language, surprisingly little effort has been focused on the problem of logical inference in natural language and the possibility of its completeness. Even the traditional theory of the syllogism does not give a thorough analysis of the restricted syntax it uses.My objective is to show how (...)
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  9. Marie-Hélène Congourdeau (2008). Les pères peuvent-ils se tromper? Saints, didascales et pères à Byzance sous les Paléologues. Chôra 6:51-58.score: 54.0
    Towards the end of the Byzantine Empire many texts of the Latin Fathers were translated into Greek, beginning with the De Trinitate of Augustine. This flurry of translation spurred discussion on the authority of the Fathers. The Greeks were now confronted with the problem of what one should do when the (presumably infallible) Fathers justify apparent heresy (the Filioque) ? This question became crucial after the Council of Florence and the fall of the Byzantine Empire. What is the definition (...)
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  10. Ralph Shain (2008). Is Recognition a Zero-Sum Game? Telos 2008 (143):63-87.score: 54.0
    In the last two decades, a number of political theorists have published a great deal of theory that argues for the centrality of the idea of recognition. In the most prominent of these papers, Charles Taylor makes the claim that “recognition is a human need.”1 The immediate spur for this flurry of interest has been a discussion of multiculturalism and its attendant issues, which are expressed in terms of “group recognition.”2 This work focuses on the importance of group identity (...)
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  11. Joshua Shaw (2010). Philosophy of Humor. Philosophy Compass 5 (2):112-126.score: 28.0
    Humor is a surprisingly understudied topic in philosophy. However, there has been a flurry of interest in the subject over the past few decades. This article outlines the major theories of humor. It argues for the need for more publications on humor by philosophers. More specifically, it suggests that humor may not be a well-understood phenomenon by questioning a widespread consensus in recent publications – namely, that humor can be detached from laughter. It is argued that this consensus relies (...)
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  12. Ramona Cristina Ilea (2009). Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):153-167.score: 28.0
    By 2050, global livestock production is expected to double—growing faster than any other agricultural sub-sector—with most of this increase taking place in the developing world. As the United Nation’s four-hundred-page report, Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options , documents, livestock production is now one of three most significant contributors to environmental problems, leading to increased greenhouse gas emissions, land degradation, water pollution, and increased health problems. The paper draws on the UN report as well as a flurry of (...)
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  13. Ron Mallon (2006). 'Race': Normative, Not Metaphysical or Semantic. Ethics 116 (3):525-551.score: 28.0
    In recent years, there has been a flurry of work on the metaphysics of race. While it is now widely accepted that races do not share robust, bio-behavioral essences, opinions differ over what, if anything, race is. Recent work has been divided between three apparently quite different answers. A variety of theorists argue for racial skepticism, the view that races do not exist at all.[iv] A second group defends racial constructionism, holding that races are in some way socially constructed.[v],[vi] (...)
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  14. Justin Sytsma (2010). Folk Psychology and Phenomenal Consciousness. Philosophy Compass 5 (8):700-711.score: 28.0
    In studying folk psychology, cognitive and developmental psychologists have mainly focused on how people conceive of non-experiential states such as beliefs and desires. As a result, we know very little about how non-philosophers (or the folk) understand the mental states that philosophers typically classify as being phenomenally conscious. In particular, it is not known whether the folk even tend to classify mental states in terms of their being or not being phenomenally conscious in the first place. Things have changed dramatically (...)
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  15. Joshua Rust (2006). John Searle and the Construction of Social Reality. Continuum.score: 28.0
    John Searle (1932-) is one of the most famous living American philosophers. A pupil of J. L. Austin at Oxford in the 1950s, he is currently Mills Professor of the Philosophy of Mind and Language at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1995 John Searle published "The Construction of Social Reality", a text which not only promises to disclose the institutional backdrop against which speech takes place, but initiate a new 'philosophy of society'. Since then "The Construction of Social Reality" (...)
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  16. Jutta Schickore (2011). More Thoughts on HPS: Another 20 Years Later. Perspectives on Science 19 (4):453-481.score: 28.0
    This essay offers some reflections on the recent history of the disputes about the relation between history and philosophy of science (HPS) and the merits and prospects of HPS as an intellectual endeavor. As everyone knows, the issue was hotly debated in the 1960s and 1970s. That was the hey-day of the slogan "history without philosophy of science is blind, philosophy without history of science is empty" as well as of the many variations on the theme of HPS as a (...)
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  17. Trevor Kvaran & Alan G. Sanfey (2010). Toward an Integrated Neuroscience of Morality: The Contribution of Neuroeconomics to Moral Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):579-595.score: 28.0
    Interest in the neural processes underlying decision making has led to a flurry of recent research in the fields of both moral psychology and neuroeconomics. In this paper, we first review some important findings from both disciplines, and then argue that the two fields can mutually benefit each other. A more explicit recognition of the role of values and norms will likely lead to more accurate models of decision making for neuroeconomists, whereas the tasks, insights into neural mechanisms, and (...)
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  18. Thomas L. Pangle (2006). Leo Strauss: An Introduction to His Thought and Intellectual Legacy. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 28.0
    Leo Strauss's controversial writings have long exercised a profound subterranean cultural influence. Now their impact is emerging into broad daylight, where they have been met with a flurry of poorly informed, often wildly speculative, and sometimes rather paranoid pronouncements. This book, written as a corrective, is the first accurate, non-polemical, comprehensive guide to Strauss's mature political philosophy and its intellectual influence. Thomas L. Pangle opens a pathway into Strauss's major works with one question: How does Strauss's philosophic thinking contribute (...)
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  19. Mauricio Suárez & Iñaki San Pedro (2010). Causal Markov, Robustness and the Quantum Correlations. In Mauricio Suarez (ed.), Causes, Probabilities and Propensities in Physics. Springer. 173–193.score: 28.0
    It is still a matter of controversy whether the Principle of the Common Cause (PCC) can be used as a basis for sound causal inference. It is thus to be expected that its application to quantum mechanics should be a correspondingly controversial issue. Indeed the early 90’s saw a flurry of papers addressing just this issue in connection with the EPR correlations. Yet, that debate does not seem to have caught up with the most recent literature on causal inference (...)
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  20. Girish J. Gulati (2011). News Frames and Story Triggers in the Media's Coverage of Human Trafficking. Human Rights Review 12 (3):363-379.score: 28.0
    Since 2000, there has been a flurry of policy activity to address the problem of human trafficking. A wide consensus has formed in most of the international community on the nature of the problem. However, there is considerable disagreement among scholars and activists over definitions and how best to address the problem. A content analysis of relevant articles in The New York Times and Washington Post between 1980 and 2006 reveals that media coverage has relied mostly on official sources (...)
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  21. Mauricio Suárez & Iñaki San Pedro, EPR, Robustness and the Causal Markov Condition.score: 28.0
    It is still a matter of controversy whether the Principle of the Common Cause (PCC) can be used as a basis for sound causal inference. It is thus to be expected that its application to quantum mechanics should be a correspondingly controversial issue. Indeed the early 90's saw a flurry of papers addressing just this issue in connection with the EPR correlations. Yet, that debate does not seem to have caught up with the most recent literature on causal inference (...)
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  22. Pierre Poirier, Be There, or Be Square! On the Importance of Being There.score: 24.0
    By using the name of one of his first papers (See Clark 1987) for his latest book, Andy Clark proves how consistent his view of the mind has been over his career. Indeed Being There becomes the latest in a ten year effort, laid out over a series of books, to flesh out one of the few comprehensive proposals in philosophy of mind since Fodor’s Representational Theory of Mind (RTM). Each book in the series accentuates one aspect of Clark’s view. (...)
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  23. R. Edward Freeman, Daniel R. Gilbert & Carol Jacobson (1987). The Ethics of Greenmail. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (3):165 - 178.score: 24.0
    In the contemporary flurry of hostile corporate takeover activity, the ethics of the practice of greenmail have been called into question. The authors provide an account of greenmail in parallel with Daniel Ellsberg's conception of blackmail, as consisting of two conditions: a threat condition and a compliance condition.The analysis then proceeds to consider two questions: Is all greenmail morally wrong? Are all hostile takeovers morally wrong? The authors conclude that there is no basis for answering either question in the (...)
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  24. C. Gavaghan (2009). "You Can't Handle the Truth"; Medical Paternalism and Prenatal Alcohol Use. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):300-303.score: 24.0
    The publication of the latest contribution to the alcohol-in-pregnancy debate, and the now customary flurry of media attention it generated, have precipitated the renewal of a series of ongoing debates about safe levels of consumption and responsible prenatal conduct. The University College London (UCL) study’s finding that low levels of alcohol did not contribute to adverse behavioural outcomes—and may indeed have made a positive contribution in some cases—is unlikely to be the last word on the subject. Proving a negative (...)
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  25. John Sutton (2002). Review of Dennis Des Chene, Life's Form: Late Aristotelian Conceptions of the Soul. [REVIEW] Metapsychology 6 (22).score: 24.0
    In the late 16th and early 17th centuries, a number of ‘liberal Jesuit scholastics’ produced the last great synthesis of Aristotelian psychology with Christian theology. In this magnificently sympathetic reconstruction of their systems of the soul, Dennis Des Chene rescues Toletus, Suarez, and the other ‘schoolmen’ from neglect which resulted from scornful dismissals by Descartes and his fellows. Deliberating bypassing the political and medical contexts of their work, and focusing almost exclusively on Jesuit rather than other, ‘dissident’ Renaissance Aristotelianisms, Des (...)
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  26. Oladele Abiodun Balogun (2008). Rethinking the Tasks of African Philosophy in the 21st Century. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:45-54.score: 24.0
    The flurry of debate that trailed the existence of African philosophy in the 1960s and 70s and the consequent demise of the controversies in the late 1990s have occasioned a periodiszation shift from traditional African philosophy to contemporary African philosophy. While the scope and nature of predominant issues inthese periods differ considerably, what ought to constitute the basis and shape the direction of discourse in contemporary African philosophy remain controversial. In this regard, this paper argues that rethinking African philosophy (...)
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  27. Douglas Hollan (2012). Emerging Issues in the Cross-Cultural Study of Empathy. Emotion Review 4 (1):70-78.score: 24.0
    Especially since the discovery of mirror neurons, scholars in a variety of disciplines have made empathy a central focus of research. Yet despite this recent flurry of interest and activity, the cross-cultural study of empathy in context, as part of ongoing, naturally occurring behavior, remains in its infancy. In the present article, I review some of this recent work on the ethnography of empathy. I focus especially on the new issues and questions about empathy that the ethnographic approach raises (...)
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  28. J. J. Boxtel, N. Tsuchiya & C. Koch (2009). Consciousness and Attention: On Sufficiency and Necessity. Frontiers in Psychology 1:217-217.score: 24.0
    Recent research has slowly corroded a belief that selective attention and consciousness are so tightly entangled that they cannot be individually examined. In this review, we summarize psychophysical and neurophysiological evidence for a dissociation between top-down attention and consciousness. The evidence includes recent findings that show subjects can attend to perceptually invisible objects. More contentious is the finding that subjects can become conscious of an isolated object, or the gist of the scene in the near absence of top-down attention; we (...)
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  29. Howard Eiland (2011). Allegories of Falling. Telos 2011 (155):175-190.score: 24.0
    ExcerptAnd therefore as a stranger give it welcome … Shakespeare, Hamlet, 1.5.165At the end, in a role-reversal at once desperate and sublime, Hamlet stills the unaccustomed passion of his stoical friend Horatio by reminding him he's a man first, before being a Dane or antique Roman. He recalls him to himself out of his suicidal flurry by simultaneously appealing to his love and assigning him a duty: in this harsh world to remain and “tell my story”—an echo of the (...)
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  30. Chris Lindsay (2012). Hume and Reid on Newtonianism, Naturalism and Liberty. In Ilya Kasavin (ed.), David Hume and Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars Press.score: 24.0
    There has been a recent flurry of work comparing and contrasting the respective methodologies of David Hume and his contemporary Thomas Reid. Both writers are explicit in their commitments to a Newtonian methodology. Yet they diverge radically on the issue of human liberty. In this paper I want to unpack the methodological commitments underlying the two different accounts of liberty. How is it that two avowed Newtonians end up diametrically opposed to one another with respect to such a fundamental (...)
     
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  31. Tomoaki Iwai (2000). Legislative Records, 2000. Japanese Journal of Political Science 1 (2):333-336.score: 8.0
    The political scene behind Japan's legislation in 2000 was uneasy and flurried. The ascent to political power by Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori following the sudden death of Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi, the shift in political framework caused by the separation of the Liberal Party from the coalition government, and the general election came one after the other in a series of restless succession.
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