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  1. Laura Betzig (forthcoming). People Are Animals. Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
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  2. Laura Betzig (forthcoming). Roman polygyny. Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
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  3. Laura Betzig (forthcoming). Why a Despot. Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
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  4. Laura Betzig (2014). Eusociality in History. Human Nature 25 (1):80-99.
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  5. Laura Betzig (2013). Eusociality: From the First Foragers to the First States. Human Nature:1-5.
    People have always been social. Ethnographic evidence suggests that transfers of food and labor are common among contemporary hunter-gatherers, and they probably were common in Paleolithic groups. Archaeological evidence suggests that cooperative breeding went up as we settled down: as territory defenders became more successful breeders, their helpers’ fertility would have been delayed or depressed. And written evidence from the Neolithic suggests that the first civilizations were often eusocial; emperors fathered hundreds of children, who were provided for and protected by (...)
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  6. Laura Betzig (2004). Where's the Beef? It's Less About Cooperation, More About Conflict. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):561-562.
    Individuals give for two reasons. One is to get a benefit back. The other is to avoid a cost. “Cooperation” theories stress mutual benefits. “Conflict” theories stress costs. Hunters may give up part of their hunt because they get favors back, or because the recipients are stronger than they are and the hunting isn't as good anywhere else.
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  7. Laura Betzig (1999). When Women Win. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):217-217.
    In Homo sapiens and other species, promiscuity, risk-taking, and aggression are less matters of sex (having XX vs. XY) than gender (giving PI vs. resources and/or genes). Classic role reversals include: sea-horses, polyandrous birds, and a few heiresses in England and Rome. Unlike other females, but like many males, they are assertive, they take chances, and they are not chaste.
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  8. Laura Betzig (1994). The Point of Politics. Analyse and Kritik 16:20-37.
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  9. Laura Betzig (1993). Where Are the Bastards' Daddies? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):284.
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  10. Laura Betzig (1991). A Little More Mortar for a Firm Foundation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):264.
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