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Laura J. Spence [20]Laura Spence [3]
  1. Angela Ayios, Ronald Jeurissen, Paul Manning & Laura J. Spence (2014). Social Capital: A Review From an Ethics Perspective. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (1):108-124.
    Social capital has as its key element the value of social relationships to generate positive outcomes, both for the key parties involved and for wider society. Some authors have noted that social capital nevertheless has a dark side. There is a moral element to such a conceptualisation, yet there is scarce discussion of ethics within the social capital literature. In this paper ethical theory is applied to four traditions or approaches to economic social capital: neo-capitalism; network/reputation; neo-Tocquevellian; and development. Each (...)
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  2. Dorothée Baumann-Pauly, Christopher Wickert, Laura J. Spence & Andreas Georg Scherer (2013). Organizing Corporate Social Responsibility in Small and Large Firms: Size Matters. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):693-705.
    Based on the findings of a qualitative empirical study of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Swiss MNCs and SMEs, we suggest that smaller firms are not necessarily less advanced in organizing CSR than large firms. Results according to theoretically derived assessment frameworks illustrate the actual implementation status of CSR in organizational practices. We propose that small firms possess several organizational characteristics that are favorable for promoting the internal implementation of CSR-related practices in core business functions, but constrain external communication and (...)
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  3. Ronald K. Mitchell, Bradley R. Agle, James J. Chrisman & Laura J. Spence (2011). Special Section-Stakeholder Theory, Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Family Enterprise-Toward a Theory of Stakeholder Salience in Family Firms. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):235.
     
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  4. Ronald K. Mitchell, Bradley R. Agle, James J. Chrisman & Laura J. Spence (2011). Toward a Theory of Stakeholder Salience in Family Firms. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):235-255.
    The notion of stakeholder salience based on attributes (e.g., power, legitimacy, urgency) is applied in the family business setting. We argue that where principal institutions intersect (i.e., family and business); managerial perceptions of stakeholder salience will be different and more complex than where institutions are based on a single dominant logic. We propose that (1) whereas utilitarian power is more likely in the general business case, normative power is more typical in family business stakeholder salience; (2) whereas in a general (...)
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  5. Laura J. Spence (2007). CSR and Small Business in a European Policy Context: The Five “C”s of CSR and Small Business Research Agenda 2007. Business and Society Review 112 (4):533-552.
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  6. Geoff Moore & Laura Spence (2006). Editorial: Responsibility and Small Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (3):219-226.
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  7. Laura J. Spence (2005). European Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):723-732.
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  8. Laura J. Spence (2004). Forever Friends?: Friendship, Dynamic Relationships and Small Firm Social Responsibility. Business Ethics 1:3.
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  9. Bruce Macfarlane & Laura J. Spence (2003). Redefining the Scholarship of Business Ethics: An Editorial. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):1-6.
    Traditionally, the term "scholarship" has been narrowly defined as discovery-based research. Teaching in higher education, by contrast, is perceived as an intellectually inferior activity. However, the teaching-research divide is a crude distinction which fails to capture the richness of scholarly endeavour in all disciplines. Drawing on Boyer''s four forms of scholarship, it is argued that academic work in business ethics needs to be reconceptualised in terms which honour and value all contributions. This special issue of the Journal of Business Ethics, (...)
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  10. Laura J. Spence & Robert Rutherfoord (2003). Small Business and Empirical Perspectives in Business Ethics: Editorial. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (1):1 - 5.
    In this editorial to a collection of papers on ethics in small firms, the case is made for greater use of high quality empirical research on business ethics. Sociological perspectives have much to offer to the field of business ethics that continues to be dominated by normative, moral philosophy. The second contribution of the paper is to argue for a reorientation away from the large multi-national firm as a benchmark subject of business ethics research. One important point of view to (...)
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  11. Laura J. Spence & René Schmidpeter (2003). SMEs, Social Capital and the Common Good. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1/2):93 - 108.
    In this paper we report on empirical research which investigates social capital of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs). Bringing an international perspective to the work, we make a comparison between 30 firms located in West London and Munich in the sectors of food manufacturing/production, marketing services and garages. Here we present 6 case studies, which we use to illustrate the early findings from this pilot project. We identify differences in approach to associational membership in Germany and the U.K., with (...)
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  12. Laura J. Spence, René Schmidpeter & André Habisch (2003). Assessing Social Capital: Small and Medium Sized Enterprises in Germany and the U.K. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (1):17 - 29.
    "Social capital" can be considered to be the product of co-operationbetween various institutions, networks and business partners. It haspotential as a useful tool for business ethics. In this article weidentify categories pertinent to the measurement of social capital insmall and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). By drawing on three differentsectors, one business-to-business service, one business-to-customerservice, and one manufacturing, we have enabled the consideration ofsectoral differences. We find sector to play an important part inrelation to business practices and social capital. Our inclusion (...)
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  13. Michelle Ng Kwet Shing & Laura J. Spence (2002). Investigating the Limits of Competitive Intelligence Gathering: Is Mystery Shopping Ethical? Business Ethics 11 (4):343-353.
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  14. Michelle Ng Kwet Shing & Laura J. Spence (2002). Investigating the Limits of Competitive Intelligence Gathering: Is Mystery Shopping Ethical? Business Ethics 11 (4):343–353.
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  15. Laura J. Spence (2002). 'Like Building a New Motorway': Establishing the Rules for Ethical Email Use at a UK Higher Education Institution. Business Ethics 11 (1):40–51.
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  16. Laura J. Spence & David Wadsworth (2002). Using an Electronic Bulletin Board in Teaching Business Ethics: En Route to a Virtual Agora. Teaching Business Ethics 6 (3):335-354.
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  17. Adela Cortina, José Luis Fernández, Diego Hidalgo, Albert Löhr, José Ángel Sánchez Asiaín & Laura J. Spence (2001). The 14th Annual Conference of the European Business Ethics Network. Journal of Business Ethics 30:121-122.
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  18. Laura J. Spence, Anne‐Marie Coles & Lisa Harris (2001). The Forgotten Stakeholder? Ethics and Social Responsibility in Relation to Competitors. Business and Society Review 106 (4):331-352.
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  19. Laura Spence (2000). Teaching Business Ethics: Are There Differences Within Europe, and is There a European Difference? Business Ethics 9 (1):58–64.
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  20. Laura J. Spence (2000). The Best Teacher I Ever Had Was... Dorothy Hewitt. Teaching Business Ethics 4 (1):107-108.
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  21. Laura J. Spence & José Félix Lozano (2000). Communicating About Ethics with Small Firms: Experiences From the U.K. And Spain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):43 - 53.
    This article introduces the important issue of communicating with small firms about ethical issues. Evidence from two research projects from the U.K. and Spain are used to indicate some of the important issues and how small firms may differ from large firms in this area. The importance of informal mechanisms such as the influence of friends, family and employees are highlighted, and the likely ineffectiveness of formal tools such as Codes and Social and Ethical Standards suggested. Further resarch in the (...)
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  22. Laura J. Spence (1999). Does Size Matter? The State of the Art in Small Business Ethics. Business Ethics 8 (3):163–174.
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  23. Laura Spence (1998). On Effective Interdisciplinary Alliances in European Business Ethics Research: Discussion and Illustration. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1029-1044.
    Cooperation in business ethics research is important across disciplines, to help strengthen the base of a field which is still new in Europe. A study on recruitment interviewing in Germany, U.K. and the Netherlands is used to demonstrate the value of interdisciplinary business ethics research, particularly across cultures.
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