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Profile: Laura Valentini (The Queen's College, Oxford)
  1. Christian List & Laura Valentini, Political Theory.
    Political theory, sometimes also called “normative political theory”, is a subfield of the disciplines of philosophy and political science that addresses conceptual, normative, and evaluative questions concerning politics and society, broadly construed. Examples are: When is a society just? What does it mean for its members to be free? When is one distribution of goods socially preferable to another? What makes a political authority legitimate? How should we trade off different values, such as liberty, prosperity, and security, against one another? (...)
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  2. Laura Valentini (2014). Human Rights and Discourse Theory: Some Critical Remarks. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (6):674-680.
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  3. Laura Valentini (2013). Ethics for a Broken World: Imagining Philosophy After Catastrophe, by Tim Mulgan. Mind 122 (488):1161-1164.
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  4. Laura Valentini (2012). Assessing the Global Order: Justice, Legitimacy, or Political Justice? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (5):593-612.
    Which standards should we employ to evaluate the global order? Should they be standards of justice or standards of legitimacy? In this article, I argue that liberal political theorists need not face this dilemma, because liberal justice and legitimacy are not distinct values. Rather, they indicate what the same value, i.e. equal respect for persons, demands of institutions under different sets of circumstances. I suggest that under real-world circumstances ? characterized by conflicts and disagreements ? equal respect demands basic-rights protection (...)
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  5. Laura Valentini (2012). Human Rights, Freedom, and Political Authority. Political Theory 40 (5):573 - 601.
    In this article, I sketch a Kant-inspired liberal account of human rights: the freedom-centred view. This account conceptualizes human rights as entitlements that any political authority—any state in the first instance—must secure to qualify as a guarantor of its subjects' innate right to freedom. On this picture, when a state (or state-like institution) protects human rights, it reasonably qualifies as a moral agent to be treated with respect. By contrast, when a state (or state-like institution) fails to protect human rights, (...)
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  6. Laura Valentini (2012). Ideal Vs. Non-Ideal Theory: A Conceptual Map. Philosophy Compass 7 (9):654-664.
  7. Laura Valentini (2012). Kant, Ripstein and the Circle of Freedom: A Critical Note. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):450-459.
    Much contemporary political philosophy claims to be Kant-inspired, but its aims and method differ from Kant's own. In his recent book, Force and Freedom, Arthur Ripstein advocates a more orthodox Kantian outlook, presenting it as superior to dominant (Kant-inspired) views. The most striking feature of this outlook is its attempt to ground the whole of political morality in one right: the right to freedom, understood as the right to be independent of others’ choices. Is Ripstein's Kantian project successful? In this (...)
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  8. Laura Valentini (2011). A Paradigm Shift in Theorizing About Justice? A Critique of Sen. Economics and Philosophy 27 (03):297-315.
    In his recent book The Idea of Justice, Amartya Sen suggests that political philosophy should move beyond the dominant, Rawls-inspired, methodological paradigm transcendental institutionalism towards a more practically oriented approach to justice: . In this article, I argue that Sen's call for a paradigm shift in thinking about justice is unwarranted. I show that his criticisms of the Rawlsian approach are either based on misunderstandings, or correct but of little consequence, and conclude that the Rawlsian approach already delivers much of (...)
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  9. Laura Valentini (2011). Coercion and (Global) Justice. American Political Science Review 105 (1):205-220.
    In this article, I develop a new account of the liberal view that principles of justice (in general) are meant to justify state coercion, and consider its implications for the question of global socioeconomic justice (in particular). Although contemporary proponents of this view deny that principles of socioeconomic justice apply globally, on my newly developed account this conclusion is mistaken. I distinguish between two types of coercion, systemic and interactional, and argue that a plausible theory of global justice should contain (...)
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  10. Laura Valentini (2011). Gillian Brock, Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):251-252.
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  11. Laura Valentini (2011). Global Justice and Practice-Dependence: Conventionalism, Institutionalism, Functionalism. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (4):399-418.
  12. Laura Valentini (2011). Justice in a Globalized World: A Normative Framework. OUP Oxford.
    While the lives of millions of people are overshadowed by poverty and destitution, a relatively small subset of the world's population enjoys an unprecedented level of wealth. No doubt the world's rich have duties to address the plight of the global poor. But should we think of these as duties of egalitarian justice much like those applying domestically, or as weaker duties of humanitarian assistance? In this book, Laura Valentini offers an in-depth critique of the two most prominent answers to (...)
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  13. Laura Valentini (2011). " Measuring Justice: Primary Goods and Capabilities," Harry Brighouse and Ingrid Robeyns, Eds.[Full Text]. Ethics and International Affairs 25.
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  14. Laura Valentini (2011). Measuring Justice: Primary Goods and Capabilities, Harry Brighouse and Ingrid Robeyns, Eds. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 247 Pp., $85 Cloth, $29.99 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 25 (1):95-96.
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  15. Laura Valentini (2011). On the Duty to Withhold Global Aid Now to Save More Lives in the Future. Ethics and Global Politics 4 (2):125-34.
    The world is riddled with human suffering, poverty, and destitution. In the face of this moral tragedy, the least that the global wealthy can do is try to support aid programs aimed at relieving the plight of the very poor. Many political leaders, pop stars, and religious personalities have realized this, and routinely urge us to be more sensitive to the conditions of the distant needy. Giving aid thus seems to be one of the most important moral imperatives of our (...)
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  16. Laura Valentini (2010). Review of Lukas H. Meyer (Ed.), Legitimacy, Justice and Public International Law. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  17. Christian Barry & Laura Valentini (2009). Egalitarian Challenges to Global Egalitarianism: A Critique. Review of International Studies 35:485-512.
  18. Laura Valentini (2009). On the Apparent Paradox of Ideal Theory. Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (3):332-355.
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  19. Miriam Ronzoni & Laura Valentini (2008). On the Meta-Ethical Status of Constructivism: Reflections on G.A. Cohen's `Facts and Principles'. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (4):403-422.
    The Queen's College, Oxford, UK In his article `Facts and Principles', G.A. Cohen attempts to refute constructivist approaches to justification by showing that, contrary to what their proponents claim, fundamental normative principles are fact- in sensitive. We argue that Cohen's `fact-insensitivity thesis' does not provide a successful refutation of constructivism because it pertains to an area of meta-ethics which differs from the one tackled by constructivists. While Cohen's thesis concerns the logical structure of normative principles, constructivists ask how normative principles (...)
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