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  1. Keith A. Bauer, Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, Paul J. Ford, Sven Ove Hansson, Matti Häyry, Sarah Hayward, Peter Herissone-Kelly & Micah Hester (2007). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16:251-253.
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  2. Françoise Baylis, Robert H. Blank, Courtney S. Campbell, Anjan Chatterjee, Lauren A. Clark, Hubert Doucet, Jocelyn Downie & Kathinka Evers (2007). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16:121-123.
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  3. Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, David Loy, James F. Keenan, Kathleen Matthews, Terry Winograd & Laurie Zoloth (2007). The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 1). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):229-239.
    A substantial portion of the developed world's population is increasingly dependent on machines to make their way in the everyday world. For certain privileged groups, computers, cell phones, PDAs, Blackberries, and IPODs, all permitting the faster processing of information, are commonplace. In these populations, even exercise can be automated as persons try to achieve good physical fitness by riding stationary bikes, running on treadmills, and working out on cross-trainers that send information about performance and heart rate.
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  4. Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, David Loy, James F. Keenan, Kathleen Matthews, Terry Winograd & Laurie Zoloth (2007). The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 2). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (03):268-280.
    A substantial portion of the developed world's population is increasingly dependent on machines to make their way in the everyday world. For certain privileged groups, computers, cell phones, PDAs, Blackberries, and IPODs, all permitting the faster processing of information, are commonplace. In these populations, even exercise can be automated as persons try to achieve good physical fitness by riding stationary bikes, running on treadmills, and working out on cross-trainers that send information about performance and heart rate.
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