Search results for 'Lauren A. Rogers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mary M. Brabeck, Lauren A. Rogers, Selcuk Sirin, Jennifer Henderson, Michael Benvenuto, Monica Weaver & Kathleen Ting (2000). Increasing Ethical Sensitivity to Racial and Gender Intolerance in Schools: Development of the Racial Ethical Sensitivity Test. Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):119 – 137.score: 960.0
    This article is an attempt to develop a measure of ethical sensitivity to racial and gender intolerance that occurs in schools. Acts of intolerance that indicate ethically insensitive behaviors in American schools were identified and tied to existing professional ethical codes developed by school-based professional organizations. The Racial Ethical Sensitivity Test (REST) consists of 5 scenarios that portray acts of racial intolerance and ethical insensitivity. Participants viewed 2 videotaped scenarios and then responded to a semistructured interview protocol adapted from Bebeau (...)
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  2. Mary M. Brabeck & Lauren Rogers (2000). Human Rights as a Moral Issue: Lessons for Moral Educators From Human Rights Work. Journal of Moral Education 29 (2):167-182.score: 720.0
    Recent history has seen an increasing trend toward ?crossing over? between contexts and cultures. As individuals and groups learn more about each other, opportunities arise to create stronger resources for respecting and protecting human rights. One such possible ?crossing over? is between the field of moral education and the ideals and techniques of human rights work. While moral education and human rights work share many ideas and methods, areas of difference provide points to strengthen moral education. The foundation of human (...)
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  3. Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.) (2005). Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 480.0
    Philosophy written in English is overwhelmingly analytic philosophy, and the techniques and predilections of analytic philosophy are not only unhistorical but anti-historical, and hostile to textual commentary. Analytic usually aspires to a very high degree of clarity and precision of formulation and argument, and it often seeks to be informed by, and consistent with, current natural science. In an earlier era, analytic philosophy aimed at agreement with ordinary linguistic intuitions or common sense beliefs, or both. All (...)
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  4. Wendy A. Rogers (2002). Is There a Tension Between Doctors' Duty of Care and Evidence-Based Medicine? Health Care Analysis 10 (3):277-287.score: 480.0
    The interaction between evidence-based medicineand doctors' duty of care to patients iscomplex. One the one hand, there is surely anobligation to take account of the bestavailable evidence when offering health care topatients. On the other hand, it is equallyimportant to be aware of important shortcomingsin the processes and practices ofevidence-based medicine. There are tensionsbetween the population focus of evidence-basedmedicine and the duties that doctors have toindividual patients. Implementingevidence-based medicine may have unpredictableconsequences upon the overall quality of healthcare. Patients may have (...)
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  5. W. Rogers & A. Ballantyne (2010). Towards a Practical Definition of Professional Behaviour. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):250-254.score: 480.0
    Context Professionalism remains a challenging part of the medical curriculum to define, teach and evaluate. We suggest that one way to meet these challenges is to clarify the definition of professionalism and distinguish this from medical ethics. Methods Our analysis is two staged. First, we reviewed influential definitions of professionalism and separated elements relating to (a) ethico-legal competencies, (b) clinical competence and (c) professionalism. In reference to professionalism, we then distinguished between aspirational virtues/values and specific behaviours. From these, we develop (...)
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  6. G. A. J. Rogers (1972). Locke's Philosophy of Science and Knowledge. A Consideration of Some Aspects of 'an Essay Concerning Human Understanding'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):183-189.score: 480.0
  7. B. R. Bugelski, R. A. Coyer & W. A. Rogers (1952). A Criticism of Pre-Acquisition and Pre-Extinction of Expectancies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (1):27.score: 460.0
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  8. Dimitri Prybylski, William A. Alto, Stephen Rogers & Helen Pickering (1992). Measurement of Child Mortality in Association with a Multipurpose Birth Certificate Programme in the Southern Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea. Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (4).score: 460.0
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  9. Katherin A. Rogers (1998). Barry Miller, a Most Unlikely God (Notre Dame and London: University of Notre Dame Press, 1996) 175pp., £21.50 Sterling. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 34 (3):353-367.score: 420.0
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  10. Katherin A. Rogers (2007). Anselmian Eternalism: The Presence of a Timeless God. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):3-27.score: 420.0
    Anselm holds that God is timeless, time is tenseless, and humans have libertarian freedom. This combination of commitments is largely undefended incontemporary philosophy of religion. Here I explain Anselmian eternalism with its entailment of tenseless time, offer reasons for accepting it, and defend it against criticisms from William Hasker and other Open Theists. I argue that the tenseless view is coherent, that God’s eternal omniscience is consistent with libertarian freedom, that being eternal greatly enhances divine sovereignty, and that the Anselmian (...)
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  11. G. A. J. Rogers (1986). Leibniz and Locke. A Study of the "New Essays on Human Understanding". Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (4):556-558.score: 420.0
  12. Katherin A. Rogers (2007). A Clone by Any Other Name. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):247-255.score: 420.0
    The possibility of cloning human beings raises the difficult question: Which human lives have value and deserve legal protection? Current cloning legislation tries to hide the problem by illegitimately renaming the entities and processes in question. The Delaware cloning bill, (SB55 2003/2004) for example, permits and protects the creation of human embryos by cloning, as long as they will be destroyed for research and therapeutic purposes, but it adopts terminology which renders its import unclear. I show that, in the case (...)
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  13. Katherin A. Rogers (2000). A Defense of Anselm's Cur Deus Homo Argument. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:187-200.score: 420.0
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  14. G. A. J. Rogers (2006). John Yolton (1921-2005) - a Personal Appreciation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):1 – 3.score: 420.0
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  15. W. A. Rogers (2002). Is There a Moral Duty for Doctors to Trust Patients? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):77-80.score: 420.0
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  16. A. K. Rogers (1916). A Statement of Epistemological Dualism. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (7):169-181.score: 420.0
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  17. W. A. Rogers (2004). Evidence Based Medicine and Justice: A Framework for Looking at the Impact of EBM Upon Vulnerable or Disadvantaged Groups. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):141-145.score: 420.0
  18. G. M., Rene Dussaud, John Garstang, C. Sourdille, Dietrich Mulder, F. M. Stawell, B. B. Rogers, Mary Hamilton, John Cuthbert Lawson, Jules Nicole, Theophile Homolle, Maurice Holleaux, Andre Bellot, Gabriel Leroux, A. H. Smith, Cecil Headlam, L. Haward, Walter Headlam, C. E. S. Headlam, Aeschylus, Matthias Gelzer, Ernst Schmidt & Ericus Mueller (1910). Les Civilisations Prehelleniques Dans le Bassin de la Mer Egee: Etudes de Protohistoire orientaleThe Land of the Hittites: An Account of Recent Explorations and Discoveries in Asia MinorLa Duree Et l'Etendue du Voyage d'Herodote En EgypteHerodote Et la Religion de l'EgypteDie Ilias Und Ihre QuellenHomer and the IliadThe Comedies of AristophanesGreek Saints and Their FestivalsModern Greek Folklore and Ancient Greek Religion, a Study in SurvivalsLe Proces de Phidias Dans les Chroniques d'Apollodore d'Apres Un Papyrus Inedit de la Collection de Geneve, Dechifre Et Commente. Journal of Hellenic Studies 30:371.score: 420.0
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  19. A. K. Rogers (1925). A Note on Socrates and Aristotle. Mind 34 (136):471-475.score: 420.0
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  20. A. K. Rogers (1925). Discussion: A Note on Socrates and Aristotle. Mind 34 (136):471-475.score: 420.0
  21. Keith A. Meadows, Eric Gardiner, Timothy Greene, David Rogers, Daphne Russell & Lada Smoljanovic (1998). Factors Affecting General Practice Patient Response Rates to a Postal Survey of Health Status in England: A Comparative Analysis of Three Disease Groups. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (3):243-247.score: 420.0
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  22. James R. Martin, Richard C. Rogers, Donald Novin & Dennis A. Weele (1977). Excessive Gastric Retention by Vagotomized Rats and Rabbits Given a Solid Diet. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (4):291-294.score: 420.0
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  23. K. A. Meadows, F. Twidale & D. Rogers (1998). Action Research — a Model for Introducing Standardized Health Assessment in General Practice: An Exploratory Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 4 (3):225-229.score: 420.0
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  24. Audrey Smith Rogers, Donald F. Schwartz, Gloria Weissman & A. English (1998). A Case Study in Adolescent Participation in Clinical Research: Eleven Clinical Sites, One Common Protocol, and Eleven IRBs. Irb 21 (1):6-10.score: 420.0
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  25. G. A. J. Rogers (1988). Fifty Major Philosophers: A Reference Guide by Diane Collinson Croom Helm, 1987. 170 Pp. £22.50. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 29 (2):80-81.score: 420.0
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  26. G. A. J. Rogers (1969). Myself and Others: A Study in Our Knowledge of Minds. Philosophical Books 10 (1):15-17.score: 420.0
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  27. Carl Pacini, Judyth A. Swingen & Hudson Rogers (2002). The Role of the OECD and EU Conventions in Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials. Journal of Business Ethics 37 (4):385 - 405.score: 340.0
    The OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions (the OECD Convention) obligates signatory nations to make bribery of foreign public officials a criminal act on an extraterritorial basis. The purposes of this article are to describe the nature and consequences of bribery, outline the major provisions of the OECD Convention, and analyze its role in promoting transparency and accountability in international business. While the OECD Convention is not expected to totally eliminate the seeking or (...)
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  28. Jason Rogers (2010). In Defense of a Version of Satisficing Consequentialism. Utilitas 22 (2):198-221.score: 300.0
    In this paper, I develop, motivate and offer a qualified defense of a version of satisficing consequentialism (SC). I develop the view primarily in light of objections to other versions of SC recently posed by Ben Bradley. I motivate the view by showing that it (1) accommodates the intuitions apparently supporting those objections, (2) is supported by certain ‘common sense’ moral intuitions about specific cases, and (3) captures the central ideas expressed by satisficing consequentialists in the recent literature. Finally, I (...)
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  29. Katherin A. Rogers (2007). The Necessity of the Present and Anselm's Eternalist Response to the Problem of Theological Fatalism. Religious Studies 43 (1):25-47.score: 300.0
    It is often argued that the eternalist solution to the freedom/foreknowledge dilemma fails. If God's knowledge of your choices is eternally fixed, your choices are necessary and cannot be free. Anselm of Canterbury proposes an eternalist view which entails that all of time is equally real and truly present to God. God's knowledge of your choices entails only a ‘consequent’ necessity which does not conflict with libertarian freedom. I argue this by showing that if consequent necessity does conflict with libertarian (...)
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  30. Katherin A. Rogers (2004). Augustine's Compatibilism. Religious Studies 40 (4):415-435.score: 300.0
    In analysing Augustine's views on freedom it is standard to draw two distinctions; one between an earlier emphasis on human freedom and a later insistence that God alone governs human destiny, and another between pre-lapsarian and post-lapsarian freedom. These distinctions are real and important, but underlying them is a more fundamental consistency. Augustine is a compatibilist from his earliest work on freedom through his final anti-Pelagian writings, and the freedom possessed by the un-fallen and the fallen will is a compatibilist (...)
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  31. G. A. J. Rogers & Alan Ryan (eds.) (1988). Perspectives on Thomas Hobbes. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    This is the first in a series of occasional volumes of original papers on predefined themes. The Mind Association will nominate an editor or editors for each collection, and may join with other organizations in the promotion of conferences or other scholarly activities in connection with each volume. This collection, published to coincide with the 400th anniversary of Thomas Hobbes's birth, focuses on central themes in his life and work. Including essays by David Gauthier, Noel Malcolm, Arrigo Pacchi, David Raphael, (...)
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  32. Margaret Meek Lange, Wendy Rogers & Susan Dodds (2013). Vulnerability in Research Ethics: A Way Forward. Bioethics 27 (6):333-340.score: 300.0
    Several foundational documents of bioethics mention the special obligation researchers have to vulnerable research participants. However, the treatment of vulnerability offered by these documents often relies on enumeration of vulnerable groups rather than an analysis of the features that make such groups vulnerable. Recent attempts in the scholarly literature to lend philosophical weight to the concept of vulnerability are offered by Luna and Hurst. Luna suggests that vulnerability is irreducibly contextual and that Institutional Review Boards (Research Ethics Committees) can only (...)
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  33. Yvonne Rogers, A Brief Introduction to Distributed Cognition©.score: 300.0
    Distributed Cognition is a hybrid approach to studying all aspects of cognition, from a cognitive, social and organisational perspective. The most well known level of analysis is to account for complex socially distributed cognitive activities, of which a diversity of technological artefacts and other tools and representations are an indispensable part.
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  34. G. A. J. Rogers (2004). Locke and the Objects of Perception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):245–254.score: 300.0
    It is common to assume that if Locke is to be regarded as a consistent epistemologist he must be read as holding that either ideas are the objects of perception or that (physical) objects are. He must either be a direct realist or a representationalist. But perhaps, paradoxical as it at first sounds, there is no reason to suppose that he could not hold both to be true. We see physical objects and when we do so we have ideas. We (...)
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  35. G. A. J. Rogers (1988). Revolutionary Politics and Locke's "Two Treatises of Government". Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (4):668-670.score: 300.0
    'It would ... be a pity if the sketch of religious controversy in the 1670s contained in Richard Ashcraft's bold and exhilarating attempt to reconstruct the argument and intellectual framework of Locke's political thinking and activity should be thought to represent the entire debate accurately.' (Spurr 1988, 567 n. 17) 'has also taken the view that Locke equated the dissolution of government with the state of nature [pp. 576–6]. Important opponents of this view include Dunn [1969, p. 181] and Franklin (...)
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  36. Connal Lee, Wendy A. Rogers & Annette Braunack-Mayer (2008). Social Justice and Pandemic Influenza Planning: The Role of Communication Strategies. Public Health Ethics 1 (3):223-234.score: 300.0
    Department of Medical Education, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001. Tel.: +61-8-7225-1111; Fax: +61-8-8204-5675; Email: lee0359{at}flinders.edu.au ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract This paper analyses the role of communication strategies in pandemic influenza (PI) planning. Our central concern is with the extent to which (...)
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  37. Katherin A. Rogers (2007). Libertarianism in Kane and Anselm. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:279-290.score: 300.0
    Anselm of Canterbury is the first Christian philosopher, perhaps the first philosopher, to offer a systematic analysis of libertarian freedom. His work prefigures that of Robert Kane, and looking at the two philosophers together is helpful in understanding and appreciating the work of each of them. In this paper I show how Anselm adopts a view of choice that foreshadows Kane’s doctrine of ‘plural voluntary control.’ Kane proposes this doctrine as an attempt to answer the ‘luck’ problem. Alfred Mele criticizes (...)
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  38. G. A. J. Rogers (ed.) (1994). Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    Three hundred years after his major publications, John Locke remains one of the most potent philosophical influences in the world today. His epistemology has become embedded in our everyday presumptions about the world, and his political theory lies at the heart of the liberal democratic state. This collection by a distinguished international group of scholars looks both at core areas of Locke's philosophy and political theory and at areas not usually discussed--the links between Locke's philosophy and his religious and political (...)
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  39. Jon Richard, James L. Werth & James R. Rogers (2000). Rational and Assisted Suicidal Communication on the Internet: A Case Example and Discussion of Ethical and Practice Issues. Ethics and Behavior 10 (3):215 – 238.score: 300.0
    The development of ethical and practice guidelines related to mental health service on the Internet has lagged behind the movement of practitioners into this area. Even for clinicians who are not offering services on the Web, the Internet has led to confusion and concern about proper roles and responsibilities. This article discusses an actual experience we had with a self-described rationally suicidal man with multiple sclerosis (MS). After presenting some background on MS, we report initial interactions with the man verbatim (...)
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  40. Katherin A. Rogers (2005). Anselm on Eudaemonism and the Hierarchical Structure of Moral Choice. Religious Studies 41 (3):249-268.score: 300.0
    Because Anselm of Canterbury argues that the morally responsible created agent must have the option to choose between justice and benefit, many scholars conclude that he is a proto-Kantian, pitting duty against self-interest and natural inclination. This is mistaken. Anselm proposes a hierarchical schema, prefiguring that of Harry Frankfurt, in which the inclination for justice constitutes a second-order desire that one's first-order desires for benefits should be moderated to conform to God's will. I defend this interpretation through careful textual analysis, (...)
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  41. Katherin A. Rogers (2007). God is Not the Author of Sin: An Anselmian Response to McCann. Faith and Philosophy 24 (3):300-310.score: 300.0
    Following Anselm of Canterbury I argue against Hugh McCann’s claim that a traditional, classical theist understanding of God’s relationship to creation entails that God is the cause of our choices, including our choice to sin. I explain Anselm’s thesis that God causes all that has ontological status, yet does not cause sin. Then I show that McCann’s God, if not a sinner, must nonetheless be an unloving deceiver, McCann’s theodicy fails on its own terms, his proposed requirements for moral authenticity (...)
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  42. Katherin A. Rogers (2012). The Divine Controller Argument for Incompatibilism. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):275-294.score: 300.0
    Incompatibilists hold that, in order for you to be responsible, your choices must come from yourself; thus, determinism is incompatible with responsibility. One way of defending this claim is the Controller Argument: You are not responsible if your choices are caused by a controller, and natural determinism is relevantly similar to such control, therefore . . . Q.E.D. Compatibilists dispute both of these premises, insisting upon a relevant dissimilarity, or allowing, in a tollens move, that since we can be determined (...)
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  43. Katherin A. Rogers (2007). God is Not the Author of Sin. Faith and Philosophy 24 (3):300-310.score: 300.0
    Following Anselm of Canterbury I argue against Hugh McCann’s claim that a traditional, classical theist understanding of God’s relationship to creation entails that God is the cause of our choices, including our choice to sin. I explain Anselm’s thesis that God causes all that has ontological status, yet does not cause sin. Then I show that McCann’s God, if not a sinner, must nonetheless be an unloving deceiver, McCann’s theodicy fails on its own terms, his proposed requirements for moral authenticity (...)
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  44. Katherin A. Rogers (2012). Anselm on the Ontological Status of Choice. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):183-197.score: 300.0
    If God is the cause of everything that has any sort of existence at all, where is there room in the universe for rational creatures to have freedom of will? Isn’t a choice made by a created agent a sort of thing, and hence made by God? But if God causes our choices, how are we responsible such that we can be appropriately praised and blamed? Call this the dilemma of created freedom and divine omnipotence. Anselm solves the dilemma by (...)
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  45. Carol L. Rogers (2000). Making the Audience a Key Participant in the Science Communication Process. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):553-557.score: 300.0
    The public communication of science and technology has become increasingly important over the last several decades. However, understanding the audience that receives this information remains the weak link in the science communication process. This essay provides a brief review of some of the issues involved, discusses results from an audience-based study, and suggests some strategies that both scientists and journalists can use to modify media coverage in ways that can help audiences better understand major public issues that involve science and (...)
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  46. Wendy A. Rogers & Jane Johnson (2013). Addressing Within-Role Conflicts of Interest in Surgery. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):219-225.score: 300.0
    In this paper we argue that surgeons face a particular kind of within-role conflict of interests, related to innovation. Within-role conflicts occur when the conflicting interests are both legitimate goals of professional activity. Innovation is an integral part of surgical practice but can create within-role conflicts of interest when innovation compromises patient care in various ways, such as by extending indications for innovative procedures or by failures of informed consent. The standard remedies for conflicts of interest are transparency and recusal, (...)
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  47. Katherin A. Rogers (2008). Evidence for God From Certainty. Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):31-46.score: 300.0
    Human beings can have “strongly certain” beliefs—indubitable, veridical beliefs with a unique phenomenology—about necessarily true propositions like 2+2=4. On the plausible assumption that mathematical entities are platonic abstracta, naturalist theories fail to provide an adequate causal explanation for such beliefs because they cannot show how the propositional content of the causally inert abstracta can figure in a chain of physical causes. Theories which explain such beliefs as “corresponding” to the abstracta, but without any causal relationship, entail impossibilities. God, or a (...)
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  48. Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland (2008). Précis of Semantic Cognition: A Parallel Distributed Processing Approach. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):689-714.score: 300.0
    In this prcis we focus on phenomena central to the reaction against similarity-based theories that arose in the 1980s and that subsequently motivated the approach to semantic knowledge. Specifically, we consider (1) how concepts differentiate in early development, (2) why some groupings of items seem to form or coherent categories while others do not, (3) why different properties seem central or important to different concepts, (4) why children and adults sometimes attest to beliefs that seem to contradict their direct experience, (...)
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  49. Katherin A. Rogers (2011). Anselm Against McCann On God and Sin. Faith and Philosophy 28 (4):397-415.score: 300.0
    Hugh McCann argues that God wills human sin, that humans are nonetheless significantly free, and that his position provides a satisfying theodicy of sin. I defend an Anselmian view: Although God causes the existence of all that exists, He does not produce sin. Human beings are the ultimate sources of their sinning, which sinning should not happen. McCann rejoins that my position is incoherent and that my criticisms are not well taken. I respond, clarifying Anselm’s understanding of human freedom, revisiting (...)
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  50. G. A. J. Rogers (1995). Gassendi and the Birth of Modern Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (4):681-687.score: 300.0
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