Search results for 'Lauren Hale' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  33
    Benjamin Hale & Lauren Hale (2009). Choosing to Sleep. In Angus Dawson (ed.), The Philosophy of Public Health. Ashgate
    In this paper we claim that individual subjects do not have so much control over sleep that it is aptly characterized as a personal choice; and that normative implications related to public health and sleep hygiene do not necessarily follow from current findings. It should be true of any empirical study that normative implications do not necessarily follow, but we think that many public health sleep recommendations falsely infer these implications from a flawed explanatory account of the decision to sleep: (...)
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  2.  7
    Bob Hale (1999). Intuition and Reflection in Arithmetic: Bob Hale. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):75–98.
    [Michael Potter] If arithmetic is not analytic in Kant's sense, what is its subject matter? Answers to this question can be classified into four sorts according as they posit logic, experience, thought or the world as the source, but in each case we need to appeal to some further process if we are to generate a structure rich enough to represent arithmetic as standardly practised. I speculate that this further process is our reflection on the subject matter already obtained. This (...)
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  3.  14
    Brenda Hale & Rosemary Hunter (2008). A Conversation with Baroness Hale. Feminist Legal Studies 16 (2):237-248.
  4. Charles Carroll Everett & Edward Hale (1902). The Psychological Elements of Religious Faith, Lects. Ed. By E. Hale.
     
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  5. Bob Hale (2010). Still Inexplicit? Bob Hale and Crispin Wright. In Bernhard Weiss & Jeremy Wanderer (eds.), Reading Brandom: On Making It Explicit. Routledge 276.
     
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  6.  55
    Bob Hale (ed.) (2001). The Reason's Proper Study: Essays Towards a Neo-Fregean Philosophy of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    Here, Bob Hale and Crispin Wright assemble the key writings that lead to their distinctive neo-Fregean approach to the philosophy of mathematics. In addition to fourteen previously published papers, the volume features a new paper on the Julius Caesar problem; a substantial new introduction mapping out the program and the contributions made to it by the various papers; a section explaining which issues most require further attention; and bibliographies of references and further useful sources. It will be recognized as (...)
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  7. Bob Hale (2013). Necessary Beings: An Essay on Ontology, Modality, and the Relations Between Them. OUP Oxford.
    Bob Hale presents a broadly Fregean approach to metaphysics, according to which ontology and modality are mutually dependent upon one another. He argues that facts about what kinds of things exist depend on facts about what is possible. Modal facts are fundamental, and have their basis in the essences of things--not in meanings or concepts.
     
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  8.  73
    Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2008). Abstraction and Additional Nature. Philosophia Mathematica 16 (2):182-208.
    What is wrong with abstraction’, Michael Potter and Peter Sullivan explain a further objection to the abstractionist programme in the foundations of mathematics which they first presented in their ‘Hale on Caesar’ and which they believe our discussion in The Reason's Proper Study misunderstood. The aims of the present note are: To get the character of this objection into sharper focus; To explore further certain of the assumptions—primarily, about reference-fixing in mathematics, about certain putative limitations of abstractionist set theory, (...)
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  9.  25
    Bob Hale (2013). Review of G. Duke: Dummett on Abstract Objects. [REVIEW] Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 2 (2).
    Review of G. Duke: Dummett onObjects References G. Frege. Über Sinn und Bedeutung. Zeitschrift für Philosophie und philosophische Kritik, 100, 25–50, 1892. Translated in G.Frege, Collected Papers on Mathematics, Logic and Philosophy, edited by B. McGuinness. Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 157–77. G. Frege. Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik. Breslau, Verlag von W. Koebner, 1884. Translated by J.L. Austin as The Foundations of Arithmetic, Oxford, Basil Blackwell, second revised edition 1953. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy of Language. London, Duckworth, 1973. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy (...)
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  10.  44
    Bob Hale (2011). Erratum To: The Bearable Lightness of Being. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 21 (4):597-597.
    Erratum to: The Bearable Lightness of Being Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10516-010-9127-7 Authors Bob Hale, Department of Philosophy, University of Sheffield, 45 Victoria St, Sheffield, S3 7QB UK Journal Axiomathes Online ISSN 1572-8390 Print ISSN 1122-1151.
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  11.  77
    Tangley Laura & Wenzel Lauren (1986). How Will Biosciences Fare Under the New Budget? BioScience 36 (4):226-232.
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  12.  22
    Bob Hale (1988). Abstract Objects. B. Blackwell.
  13. C. J. G. Wright & Bob Hale (eds.) (1997). A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  14. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (1989). Necessity, Caution and Scepticism. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 63:175 - 238.
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  15.  17
    Bob Hale (forthcoming). Second-Order Logic: Properties, Semantics, and Existential Commitments. Synthese:1-27.
    Quine’s most important charge against second-, and more generally, higher-order logic is that it carries massive existential commitments. The force of this charge does not depend upon Quine’s questionable assimilation of second-order logic to set theory. Even if we take second-order variables to range over properties, rather than sets, the charge remains in force, as long as properties are individuated purely extensionally. I argue that if we interpret them as ranging over properties more reasonably construed, in accordance with an abundant (...)
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  16.  8
    John Hale (2006). Uncertainty About the Rest of the Sentence. Cognitive Science 30 (4):643-672.
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  17. C. Jacob Hale (2007). Sex Change, Social Change: Reflections on Identity, Institutions, and Imperialism (Review). Hypatia 23 (1):204-207.
  18. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2012). Horse Sense. Journal of Philosophy 109 (1-2):85-131.
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  19.  8
    Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2000). Implicit Definition and the a Priori. In Paul Boghossian & Christopher Peacocke (eds.), New Essays on the a Priori. Oxford University Press 286--319.
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  20.  13
    John T. Hale (2011). What a Rational Parser Would Do. Cognitive Science 35 (3):399-443.
    This article examines cognitive process models of human sentence comprehension based on the idea of informed search. These models are rational in the sense that they strive to find a good syntactic analysis quickly. Informed search derives a new account of garden pathing that handles traditional counterexamples. It supports a symbolic explanation for local coherence as well as an algorithmic account of entropy reduction. The models are expressed in a broad framework for theories of human sentence comprehension.
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  21.  45
    Bob Hale (2002). Can Arboreal Knotwork Help Blackburn Out of Frege's Abyss? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):144–149.
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  22.  38
    Bob Hale (2000). Reals by Abstraction. Philosophia Mathematica 8 (2):100--123.
    On the neo-Fregean approach to the foundations of mathematics, elementary arithmetic is analytic in the sense that the addition of a principle wliich may be held to IMJ explanatory of the concept of cardinal number to a suitable second-order logical basis suffices for the derivation of its basic laws. This principle, now commonly called Hume's principle, is an example of a Fregean abstraction principle. In this paper, I assume the correctness of the neo-Fregean position on elementary aritlunetic and seek to (...)
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  23.  93
    Bob Hale (2002). The Source of Necessity. Noûs 36 (s16):299 - 319.
    Modal Primitivism in Metaphysics
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  24.  17
    Bob Hale (2015). Philosophy of Mathematics in the Twentieth Century: Selected Essays By Charles Parsons. Analysis 75 (3):532-535.
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  25. Bob Hale (1999). On Some Arguments for the Necessity of Necessity. Mind 108 (429):23-52.
    Must we believe in logical necessity? I examine an argument for an affirmative answer given by Ian McFetridge in his posthumously published paper 'Logical Necessity: Some Issues', and explain why it fails, as it stands, to establish his conclusion. I contend, however, that McFetridge's argument can be effectively buttressed by drawing upon another argument aimed at establishing that we ought to believe that some propositions are logically necessary, given by Crispin Wright in his paper 'Inventing Logical necessity'. My contention is (...)
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  26. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2002). Benacerraf's Dilemma Revisited. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):101–129.
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  27. Bob Hale (1996). Absolute Necessities. Philosophical Perspectives 10:93 - 117.
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  28. Albert Borgmann, Holly Jean Buck, Wylie Carr, Forrest Clingerman, Maialen Galarraga, Benjamin Hale, Marion Hourdequin, Ashley Mercer, Konrad Ott, Clare Palmer, Ronald Sandler, Patrick Taylor Smith, Bronislaw Szerszynski & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. Lexington Books.
    Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management is a wide-ranging and expert analysis of the ethics of the intentional management of solar radiation. This book will be a useful tool for policy-makers, a provocation for ethicists, and an eye-opening analysis for both the scientist and the general reader with interest in climate change.
     
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  29. Crispin Wright & Bob Hale (1992). Nominalism and the Contingency of Abstract Objects. Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):111-135.
  30. Bob Hale (2002). Knowledge of Possibility and of Necessity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):1–20.
    I investigate two asymmetrical approaches to knowledge of absolute possibility and of necessity--one which treats knowledge of possibility as more fundamental, the other according epistemological priority to necessity. Two necessary conditions for the success of an asymmetrical approach are proposed. I argue that a possibility-based approach seems unable to meet my second condition, but that on certain assumptions--including, pivotally, the assumption that logical and conceptual necessities, while absolute, do not exhaust the class of absolute necessities--a necessity-based approach may be able (...)
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  31.  18
    Bob Hale (1986). Review: The Compleat Projectivist. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 36 (142):65 - 84.
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  32.  36
    Jacob Hale (1996). Are Lesbians Women? Hypatia 11 (2):94 - 121.
    I argue that Monique Wittig's view that lesbians are not women neglects the complexities involved in the composition of the category "woman." I develop an articulation of the concept "woman" in the contemporary United States, with thirteen distinct defining characteristics, none of which are necessary nor sufficient. I argue that Wittig's emphasis on the material production of "woman" through the political regime of heterosexuality, however, is enormously fruitful for feminist and queer strategizing.
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  33.  49
    W. Lauren (1986). Washington Watch: Farm Bill: Busting Erosion but Going Bust? BioScience 36 (3):151-151.
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  34.  63
    Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2009). Focus Restored: Comments on John MacFarlane. Synthese 170 (3):457 - 482.
    In “Double Vision Two Questions about the Neo-Fregean Programme”, John MacFarlane’s raises two main questions: (1) Why is it so important to neo-Fregeans to treat expressions of the form ‘the number of Fs’ as a species of singular term? What would be lost, if anything, if they were analysed instead as a type of quantifier-phrase, as on Russell’s Theory of Definite Descriptions? and (2) Granting—at least for the sake of argument—that Hume’s Principle may be used as a means of implicitly (...)
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  35.  47
    William Hale (2001). Robert Shackleton and the Shackleton Collection. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 83 (1):169-182.
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  36. Bob Hale (1993). Can There Be a Logic of Attitudes? In John Haldane & Crispin Wright (eds.), Reality, Representation, and Projection. Oxford University Press 337--63.
     
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  37.  19
    Bob Hale (1994). Is Platonism Epistemologically Bankrupt? Philosophical Review 103 (2):299-325.
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  38.  19
    Bob Hale (2000). Abstraction and Set Theory. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 41 (4):379--398.
    The neo-Fregean program in the philosophy of mathematics seeks a foundation for a substantial part of mathematics in abstraction principles—for example, Hume’s Principle: The number of Fs D the number of Gs iff the Fs and Gs correspond one-one—which can be regarded as implicitly definitional of fundamental mathematical concepts—for example, cardinal number. This paper considers what kind of abstraction principle might serve as the basis for a neo- Fregean set theory. Following a brief review of the main difficulties confronting the (...)
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  39.  50
    Benjamin Hale (2008). Technology, the Environment, and the Moral Considerability of Artifacts. In Evan Selinger, Jan Kyrre Berg Olson & Soren Riis (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Technology. Palgrave Macmillan
  40.  30
    Susan C. Hale (1991). Against Supererogation. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):273 - 285.
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  41. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2009). The Metaontology of Abstraction. In David John Chalmers, David Manley & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press
  42. B. Hale (2013). Properties and the Interpretation of Second-Order Logic. Philosophia Mathematica 21 (2):133-156.
    This paper defends a deflationary conception of properties, according to which a property exists if and only if there could be a predicate with appropriate satisfaction conditions. I argue that purely general properties and relations necessarily exist and discuss the bearing of this conception of properties on the interpretation of higher-order logic and on Quine's charge that higher-order logic is ‘set theory in sheep's clothing’. On my approach, the usual semantics involves a false assimilation of the logic to set theory. (...)
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  43. Bob Hale & Aviv Hoffmann (eds.) (2010). Modality: Metaphysics, Logic, and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    The philosophy of modality investigates necessity and possibility, and related notions--are they objective features of mind-independent reality? If so, are they irreducible, or can modal facts be explained in other terms? This volume presents new work on modality by established leaders in the field and by up-and-coming philosophers. Between them, the papers address fundamental questions concerning realism and anti-realism about modality, the nature and basis of facts about what is possible and what is necessary, the nature of modal knowledge, modal (...)
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  44.  75
    Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (1994). A Reductio Ad Surdum? Field on the Contingency of Mathematical Objects. Mind 103 (410):169-184.
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  45.  12
    Bob Hale (2001). A Response to Potter and Smiley: Abstraction by Recarving. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101 (3):339–358.
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  46. Bob Hale (1995). A Desperate Fix. Analysis 55 (2):74-81.
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  47.  4
    Bob Hale (1994). Singular Terms. In Brian McGuiness & Gianluigi Oliveri (eds.), The Philosophy of Michael Dummett. Kluwer 17--44.
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  48.  28
    Benjamin Hale (2006). The Moral Considerability of Invasive Transgenic Animals. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (4):337-366.
    The term moral considerability refers to the question of whether a being or set of beings is worthy of moral consideration. Moral considerability is most readily afforded to those beings that demonstrate the clearest relationship to rational humans, though many have also argued for and against the moral considerability of species, ecosystems, and “lesser” animals. Among these arguments there are at least two positions: “environmentalist” positions that tend to emphasize the systemic relations between species, and “liberationist” positions that tend to (...)
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  49.  8
    J. Bickle, G. Bonanno, B. Buldt, A. Chemero, F. Ferreira, R. Gray, V. Halbach, B. Hale, D. C. McCarty & J. M. Musacchio (2005). Hansson, SO, 323 Heyser, C., 403 Horst, S., 477. Synthese 147:551.
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  50. Benjamin Hale (2009). What's so Moral About the Moral Hazard? Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (1):1-26.
    A "moral hazard" is a market failure most commonly associated with insurance, but also associated by extension with a wide variety of public policy scenarios, from environmental disaster relief, to corporate bailouts, to natural resource policy, to health insurance. Specifically, the term "moral hazard" describes the danger that, in the face of insurance, an agent will increase her exposure to risk. If not immediately clear, such terminology invokes a moral notion, suggesting that changing one's exposure to risk after becoming insured (...)
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