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  1. Lauren Langman (2013). Capitalism, Crises, and "Great Refusals". Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):349-374.
    “Great refusals,” the progressive movements that shattered the status quo, can be best understood through the prism of critical theory that sees these mobilizations as responses to the legitimation crises of advanced capitalism that migrated into the realms of subjectivity, rendering identity a contested terrain while eliciting powerful emotions that impelled social mobilizations. Among these emotions, rooted in the Freudo-Marxist philosophical anthropology that enabled the critique of alienated labor, is the capacity for hope. And central to that notion of hope (...)
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  2. Lauren Langman (2013). Capitalism, Crises, And. Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):349-374.
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  3. Lauren Langman (2005). From Virtual Public Spheres to Global Justice: A Critical Theory of Internetworked Social Movements. Sociological Theory 23 (1):42-74.
    From the early 1990s when the EZLN (the Zapatistas), led by Subcommandte Marcos, first made use of the Internet to the late 1990s with the defeat of the Multilateral Agreement on Trade and Investment and the anti-WTO protests in Seattle, Quebec, and Genoa, it became evident that new, qualitatively different kinds of social protest movements were emergent. These new movements seemed diffuse and unstructured, yet at the same time, they forged unlikely coalitions of labor, environmentalists, feminists, peace, and global social (...)
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  4. Lauren Langman & Doug Morris (2002). Islamic Modernity: Barriers and Possibilities. Logos 1 (2):66-82.
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