7 found
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  1.  10
    Laurence Fiddick, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (2000). No Interpretation Without Representation: The Role of Domain-Specific Representations and Inferences in the Wason Selection Task. Cognition 77 (1):1-79.
  2.  17
    Leda Cosmides, John Tooby, Laurence Fiddick & Gregory A. Bryant (2005). Detecting Cheaters. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):505-506.
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  3.  13
    Laurence Fiddick (2006). Adaptive Domains of Deontic Reasoning. Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):105 – 116.
    Deontic reasoning is reasoning about permission and obligation: what one may do and what one must do, respectively. Conceivably, people could reason about deontic matters using a purely formal deontic calculus. I review evidence from a range of psychological experiments suggesting that this is not the case. Instead, I argue that deontic reasoning is supported by a collection of dissociable cognitive adaptations for solving adaptive problems that likely would have confronted ancestral humans.
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  4.  7
    H. Clark Barrett & Laurence Fiddick (2000). Evolution and Risky Decisions. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (7):251-252.
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  5. Laurence Fiddick (2003). Is There a Faculty of Oleontic Reasoning? A. In David E. Over (ed.), Evolution and the Psychology of Thinking: The Debate. Psychology Press 33.
  6.  23
    M. Todd, Laurence Fiddick & Stefan Krauss (2000). Ecological Rationality and its Contents. Thinking and Reasoning 6 (4):375 – 384.
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  7.  6
    Laurence Fiddick, Denise Dellarosa Cummins, Maria Janicki, Sean Lee & Nicole Erlich (2013). A Cross-Cultural Study of Noblesse Oblige in Economic Decision-Making. Human Nature 24 (3):318-335.
    A cornerstone of economic theory is that rational agents are self-interested, yet a decade of research in experimental economics has shown that economic decisions are frequently driven by concerns for fairness, equity, and reciprocity. One aspect of other-regarding behavior that has garnered attention is noblesse oblige, a social norm that obligates those of higher status to be generous in their dealings with those of lower status. The results of a cross-cultural study are reported in which marked noblesse oblige was observed (...)
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