Search results for 'Laurence L. Eff' (try it on Scholar)

  1. Carl M. Bender & H. F. Jones (2000). Effective Potential for Mathcal{P}Mathcal{T}-Symmetric Quantum Field Theories. Foundations of Physics 30 (3):393-411.score: 12.0
    Recently, a class of $\mathcal{P}\mathcal{T}$ -invariant scalar quantum field theories described by the non-Hermitian Lagrangian $\mathcal{L}$ = $ \frac{1}{2} $ (∂ϕ) 2 +gϕ 2 (iϕ)ε was studied. It was found that there are two regions of ε. For ε<0 the $\mathcal{P}\mathcal{T}$ -invariance of the Lagrangian is spontaneously broken, and as a consequence, all but the lowest-lying energy levels are complex. For ε≥0 the $\mathcal{P}\mathcal{T}$ -invariance of the Lagrangian is unbroken, and the entire energy spectrum is real and positive. The subtle (...)
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  2. Peter Mittelstaedt (1977). Time Dependent Propositions and Quantum Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):463 - 472.score: 12.0
    Compound propositions which can successfully be defended in a quantumdialogue independent of the elementary propositions contained in it, must have this property also independent of the mutual elementary commensur-abilities. On the other hand, formal commensurabilities must be taken into account. Therefore, for propositions which can be proved by P, irrespective of both the elementary propositions and of the elementary commensur-abilities, there exists a formal strategy of success. The totality of propositions with a formal strategy of success in a quantum dialogue (...)
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  3. Richard L. Lippke (2011). Punishing the Guilty, Not Punishing the Innocent. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):462-488.score: 6.0
    Discussion in this paper focuses on how strongly we should prefer non-punishment of persons guilty of serious crimes to punishment of persons innocent of them. William Blackstone's version of that preference, expressed as a ten to one ratio, is first shown to be untenable on standard accounts of legal punishment's justifying aims. Somewhat weaker versions of that ratio also appear suspect. More to the point, Blackstone's adage obscures the crucial way in which there are risks to be assessed in setting (...)
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