Search results for 'Laurence Taconnat' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pascale Piolino, Béatrice Desgranges, David Clarys, Bérengère Guillery-Girard, Laurence Taconnat, Michel Isingrini & Francis Eustache (2006). Autobiographical Memory, Autonoetic Consciousness, and Self-Perspective in Aging. Psychology and Aging 21 (3):510-525.score: 240.0
  2. Mathilde Sacher, Laurence Taconnat, Céline Souchay & Michel Isingrini (2009). Divided Attention at Encoding: Effect on Feeling-of-Knowing. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):754-761.score: 240.0
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  3. Stephen Laurence (2005). Tom Simpson, Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence, & Stephen Stich. In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 1--3.score: 180.0
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  4. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2001). The Poverty of the Stimulus Argument. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):217-276.score: 30.0
    Noam Chomsky's Poverty of the Stimulus Argument is one of the most famous and controversial arguments in the study of language and the mind. Though widely endorsed by linguists, the argument has met with much resistance in philosophy. Unfortunately, philosophical critics have often failed to fully appreciate the power of the argument. In this paper, we provide a systematic presentation of the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument, clarifying its structure, content, and evidential base. We defend the argument against a variety (...)
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  5. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Concepts and Conceptual Analysis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):253-282.score: 30.0
    Conceptual analysis is undergoing a revival in philosophy, and much of the credit goes to Frank Jackson. Jackson argues that conceptual analysis is needed as an integral component of so-called serious metaphysics and that it also does explanatory work in accounting for such phenomena as categorization, meaning change, communication, and linguistic understanding. He even goes so far as to argue that opponents of concep- tual analysis are implicitly committed to it in practice. We show that he is wrong on all (...)
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  6. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2007). The Ontology of Concepts: Abstract Objects or Mental Representations? Noûs 41 (4):561-593.score: 30.0
    What is a concept? Philosophers have given many different answers to this question, reflecting a wide variety of approaches to the study of mind and language. Nonetheless, at the most general level, there are two dominant frameworks in contemporary philosophy. One proposes that concepts are mental representations, while the other proposes that they are abstract objects. This paper looks at the differences between these two approaches, the prospects for combining them, and the issues that are involved in the dispute. We (...)
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  7. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2011). Learning Matters: The Role of Learning in Concept Acquisition. Mind and Language 26 (5):507-539.score: 30.0
    In LOT 2: The Language of Thought Revisited, Jerry Fodor argues that concept learning of any kind—even for complex concepts—is simply impossible. In order to avoid the conclusion that all concepts, primitive and complex, are innate, he argues that concept acquisition depends on purely noncognitive biological processes. In this paper, we show (1) that Fodor fails to establish that concept learning is impossible, (2) that his own biological account of concept acquisition is unworkable, and (3) that there are in fact (...)
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  8. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence, Concepts. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    This entry provides an overview of theories of concepts that is organized around five philosophical issues: (1) the ontology of concepts, (2) the structure of concepts, (3) empiricism and nativism about concepts, (4) concepts and natural language, and (5) concepts and conceptual analysis.
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  9. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (1999). Concepts and Cognitive Science. In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Concepts: Core Readings. MIT. 3--81.score: 30.0
    Given the fundamental role that concepts play in theories of cognition, philosophers and cognitive scientists have a common interest in concepts. Nonetheless, there is a great deal of controversy regarding what kinds of things concepts are, how they are structured, and how they are acquired. This chapter offers a detailed high-level overview and critical evaluation of the main theories of concepts and their motivations. Taking into account the various challenges that each theory faces, the chapter also presents a novel approach (...)
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  10. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2012). The Scope of the Conceptual. In Eric Margolis, Richard Samuels & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This chapter provides a critical overview of ten central arguments that philosophers have given in support of a distinction between the conceptual and the nonconceptual. We use these arguments to examine the question of whether (and in what sense) perceptual states might be deemed nonconceptual and also whether (and in what sense) animals and infants might be deemed to lack concepts. We argue that philosophers have implicitly relied on a wide variety of different ways to draw the conceptual/nonconceptual distinction and (...)
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  11. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2012). Abstraction and the Origin of General Ideas. Philosophers' Imprint 12 (19):1-22.score: 30.0
    Philosophers have often claimed that general ideas or representations have their origin in abstraction, but it remains unclear exactly what abstraction as a psychological process consists in. We argue that the Lockean aspiration of using abstraction to explain the origins of all general representations cannot work and that at least some general representations have to be innate. We then offer an explicit framework for understanding abstraction, one that treats abstraction as a computational process that operates over an innate quality space (...)
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  12. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) (1999). Concepts: Core Readings. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    The first part of the book centers around the fall of the Classical Theory of Concepts in the face of attacks by W. V. O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Eleanor ...
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  13. Stephen P. Stich & Stephen Laurence (1994). Intentionality and Naturalism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):159-82.score: 30.0
    ...the deepest motivation for intentional irrealism derives not from such relatively technical worries about individualism and holism as we.
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  14. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2013). In Defense of Nativism. Philosophical Studies 165 (2):693-718.score: 30.0
    This paper takes a fresh look at the nativism–empiricism debate, presenting and defending a nativist perspective on the mind. Empiricism is often taken to be the default view both in philosophy and in cognitive science. This paper argues, on the contrary, that there should be no presumption in favor of empiricism (or nativism), but that the existing evidence suggests that nativism is the most promising framework for the scientific study of the mind. Our case on behalf of nativism has four (...)
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  15. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2003). Concepts. In Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (eds.), Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.score: 30.0
    This entry provides an overview of theories of concepts that is organized around five philosophical issues: (1) the ontology of concepts, (2) the structure of concepts, (3) empiricism and nativism about concepts, (4) concepts and natural language, and (5) concepts and conceptual analysis.
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  16. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2001). Boghossian on Analyticity. Analysis 61 (4):293–302.score: 30.0
    In an important recent discussion of analyticity, Paul Boghossian (1997)1 argues for the following three claims: (i) While Quine’s well-known arguments against analyticity do undermine one type of analyticity (what Boghossian calls metaphysical analyticity), they fail to undermine another type (what he calls epistemic analyticity). (ii) Epistemic analyticity explains the a prioricity of logic and perhaps even the a prioricity of conceptual truths.
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  17. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2003). Should We Trust Our Intuitions? Deflationary Accounts of the Analytic Data. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (3):299-323.score: 30.0
    At least since W. V. O. Quine's famous critique of the analytic/synthetic distinction, philosophers have been deeply divided over whether there are any analytic truths. One line of thought suggests that the simple fact that people have 'intuitions of analyticity' might provide an independent argument for analyticities. If defenders of analyticity can explain these intuitions and opponents cannot, then perhaps there are analyticities after all. We argue that opponents of analyticity have some unexpected resources for explaining these intuitions and that, (...)
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  18. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (1997). Regress Arguments Against the Language of Thought. Analysis 57 (1):60-66.score: 30.0
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis is often taken to have the fatal flaw that it generates an explanatory regress. The language of thought is invoked to explain certain features of natural language (e.g., that it is learned, understood, and is meaningful), but, according to the regress argument, the language of thought itself has these same features and hence no explanatory progress has been made. We argue that such arguments rely on the tacit assumption that the entire motivation for the language (...)
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  19. Stephen Laurence, Eric Margolis & Angus Dawson (1999). Moral Realism and Twin Earth. Facta Philosophica 1:135-165.score: 30.0
    Hilary Putnam's Twin Earth thought experiment has come to have an enormous impact on contemporary philosophical thought. But while most of the discussion has taken place within the context of the philosophy of mind and language, Terence Horgan and Mark Timmons (H8cT) have defended the intriguing suggestion that a variation on the original thought experiment has important consequences for ethics.' In a series of papers, they' ve developed the idea of a Moral Twin Earth and have argued that its significance (...)
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  20. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2003). Radical Concept Nativism. Cognition 86 (1):25-55.score: 30.0
    Radical concept nativism is the thesis that virtually all lexical concepts are innate. Notoriously endorsed by Jerry Fodor (1975, 1981), radical concept nativism has had few supporters. However, it has proven difficult to say exactly what’s wrong with Fodor’s argument. We show that previous responses are inadequate on a number of grounds. Chief among these is that they typically do not achieve sufficient distance from Fodor’s dialectic, and, as a result, they do not illuminate the central question of how new (...)
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  21. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) (2007). Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representation. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This volume will be a fascinating resource for philosophers, cognitive scientists, and psychologists, and the starting point for future research in the study of ...
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  22. Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.) (2005). The Innate Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    This is the first volume of a projected three-volume set on the subject of innateness. The extent to which the mind is innate is one of the central questions in the human sciences, with important implications for many surrounding debates. By bringing together the top nativist scholars in philosophy, psychology, and allied disciplines these volumes provide a comprehensive assessment of nativist thought and a definitive reference point for future nativist inquiry. The Innate Mind: Structure and Content, concerns the fundamental architecture (...)
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  23. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2007). Linguistic Determinism and the Innate Basis of Number. In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Foundations and the Future.score: 30.0
    Strong nativist views about numerical concepts claim that human beings have at least some innate precise numerical representations. Weak nativist views claim only that humans, like other animals, possess an innate system for representing approximate numerical quantity. We present a new strong nativist model of the origins of numerical concepts and defend the strong nativist approach against recent cross-cultural studies that have been interpreted to show that precise numerical concepts are dependent on language and that they are restricted to speakers (...)
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  24. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (1999). Where the Regress Argument Still Goes Wrong: Reply to Knowles. Analysis 59 (264):321-327.score: 30.0
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis (LOT) is at the centre of a number of the most fundamental debates about the mind. Yet many philosophers want to reject LOT out of hand on the grounds that it is essentially a recid- ivistic doctrine, one that has long since been refuted. According to these philosophers, LOT is subject to a devastating regress argument. There are several versions of the argument, but the basic idea is as follows. (1) Natu- ral language has some (...)
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  25. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2005). Number and Natural Language. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Content. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 1--216.score: 30.0
    One of the most important abilities we have as humans is the ability to think about number. In this chapter, we examine the question of whether there is an essential connection between language and number. We provide a careful examination of two prominent theories according to which concepts of the positive integers are dependent on language. The first of these claims that language creates the positive integers on the basis of an innate capacity to represent real numbers. The second claims (...)
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  26. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2010). Concepts and Theoretical Unification. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):219-220.score: 30.0
    This article is a commentary on Machery (2009) Doing without Concepts. Concepts are mental symbols that have semantic structure and processing structure. This approach (1) allows for different disciplines to converge on a common subject matter; (2) it promotes theoretical unification; and (3) it accommodates the varied processes that preoccupy Machery. It also avoids problems that go with his eliminativism, including the explanation of how fundamentally different types of concepts can be co-referential.
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  27. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (1998). Multiple Meanings and Stability of Content. Journal of Philosophy 95 (5):255-63.score: 30.0
    We examine a proposal of Eric Lormand's for dealing with perhaps the chief difficulty facing holistic theories of meaning—meaning instability. The problem is that, given a robust holism, small changes in a representational system are likely to lead to meaning changes throughout the system. Consequently, different individuals are likely never to mean the same thing. Lormand suggests that holists can avoid this problem—and even secure more stability than non-holists—by positing that symbols have multiple meanings. We argue that the proposal doesn't (...)
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  28. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2002). Lewis' Strawman. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.score: 30.0
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among other things) that (...)
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  29. Stephen Laurence (1996). A Chomskian Alternative to Convention-Based Semantics. Mind 105 (418):269-301.score: 30.0
    In virtue of what do the utterances we make mean what they do? What facts about these signs, about us, and about our environment make it the case that they have the meanings they do? According to a tradition stemming from H.P. Grice through David Lewis and Stephen Schiffer it is in virtue of facts about conventions that we participate in as language users that our utterances mean what they do (see Gr'ice 1957, Lewis 1969, 1983, Schiffer 1972, 1982). This (...)
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  30. Stephen Laurence (2010). A Chomskian Alternative to Convention-Based Semantics. In Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.), Arguing About Language. Routledge. 269--301.score: 30.0
    In virtue of what do the utterances we make mean what they do? What facts about these signs, about us, and about our environment make it the case that they have the meanings they do? According to a tradition stemming from H.P. Grice through David Lewis and Stephen Schiffer it is in virtue of facts about conventions that we participate in as language users that our utterances mean what they do (see Gr'ice 1957, Lewis 1969, 1983, Schiffer 1972, 1982). This (...)
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  31. Tom Simpson, Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Amp Amp (2005). Introduction: Nativism Past and Present. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York.score: 30.0
  32. H. Clark Barrett, Stephen Stich & Stephen Laurence (2012). Should the Study of Homo Sapiens Be Part of Cognitive Science? Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):379-386.score: 30.0
    Beller, Bender, and Medin argue that a reconciliation between anthropology and cognitive science seems unlikely. We disagree. In our view, Beller et al.’s view of the scope of what anthropology can offer cognitive science is too narrow. In focusing on anthropology’s role in elucidating cultural particulars, they downplay the fact that anthropology can reveal both variation and universals in human cognition, and is in a unique position to do so relative to the other subfields of cognitive science. Indeed, without cross-cultural (...)
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  33. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2011). Beyond the Building Blocks Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):139-140.score: 30.0
    This article is a commentary on Carey (2009) The Origin of Concepts. Carey rightly rejects the building blocks model of concept acquisition on the grounds that new primitive concepts can be learned via the process of bootstrapping. But new primitives can be learned by other acquisition processes that do not involve bootstrapping, and bootstrapping itself is not a unitary process. Nonetheless, the processes associated with bootstrapping provide important insights into conceptual change.
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  34. S. Laurence & E. Margolis (1999). Review. Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong (Jerry Fodor). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (3):487-491.score: 30.0
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  35. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2008). How to Learn the Natural Numbers: Inductive Inference and the Acquisition of Number Concepts. Cognition 106 (2):924-939.score: 30.0
    Theories of number concepts often suppose that the natural numbers are acquired as children learn to count and as they draw an induction based on their interpretation of the first few count words. In a bold critique of this general approach, Rips, Asmuth, Bloomfield [Rips, L., Asmuth, J. & Bloomfield, A. (2006). Giving the boot to the bootstrap: How not to learn the natural numbers. Cognition, 101, B51–B60.] argue that such an inductive inference is consistent with a representational system that (...)
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  36. Ray Laurence (2000). S. T. A. M. Mols: Wooden Furniture in Herculaneum. Form, Technique and Function . Pp. 321, 201 Ills. Amsterdam: J. C. Gieben, 1999. Cased, Hfl. 345. ISBN: 90-5063-317-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):373-.score: 30.0
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  37. Ray Laurence (2005). Romans on the Bay of Naples J. H. D'Arms: Romans on the Bay of Naples and Other Essays on Roman Campania . Edited by F. Zevi with a Preface by A. Tchernia. (Pragmateiai: Collana di Studi E Testi Per la Storia Economica, Sociale E Amministrativa Del Mondo Antico 9.). Pp. Viii + 498, Maps, Ills, Pls. Bari: Edipuglia, 2003. Cased, €40. ISBN: 88-7228-355-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):619-.score: 30.0
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  38. Ray Laurence (2005). A Pompeii Sourcebook A. E. Cooley, M. G. L. Cooley: Pompeii: A Sourcebook . Pp. Xiv + 254, Maps, Ills. London and New York: Routledge, 2004. Paper, £16.99. ISBN: 0-415-26212-7 (0-415-26211-9 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):271-.score: 30.0
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  39. Ray Laurence (2000). R. E. L. B. De Kind: Houses in Herculaneum. A New View on the Town Planning and the Building of Insulae III and IV . Pp. Vi + 332, 27 Plans. Amsterdam: J. C. Gieben, 1988. Cased, Hfl. 145. ISBN: 90-5063-517-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):371-.score: 30.0
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  40. Ray Laurence (2002). The Celts and Roman Italy J. H. C. Williams: Beyond the Rubicon. Romans and Gauls in Republican Italy . Pp. XIII + 264, 1 Map. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001. Cased, £40. Isbn: 0-19-815300-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):328-.score: 30.0
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  41. Ray Laurence (2007). Patterson (J.R.) Landscapes and Cities. Rural Settlement and Civic Transformation in Early Imperial Italy. Pp. Xiv + 348, Ills, Maps. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £60. ISBN: 978-0-19-814088-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02).score: 30.0
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  42. Ray Laurence (2008). The Insula of the Menander (P.M.) Allison The Insula of the Menander at Pompeii. Volume III: The Finds, a Contextual Study. Pp. Xlvi + 506, Pls. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2006. Cased, £195. ISBN: 978-0-19-926312-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (02):593-.score: 30.0
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  43. Robert S. Brumbaugh & Nathaniel M. Laurence (1959). Aristotle's Philosophy of Education. Educational Theory 9 (1):1-15.score: 30.0
  44. Ray Laurence (2000). J. T. Bakker (Ed.): The Mills-Bakeries of Ostia. Description and Interpretation . Pp. 217, 30 Figs, 100 Pls. Amsterdam: J. C. Gieben, 1999. Cased, NLG 245. ISBN: 90-5063-058-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):671-.score: 30.0
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  45. R. Laurence (1996). Review. A villa near Pompeii. Pompei. Vecchi scavi sconosciuti. La villa rinvenuta del marchese Giovanni Imperiali in localita Civita (1907-1908). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (2):353-354.score: 30.0
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  46. Ray Laurence (1999). Roman Ostia Revisited A. G. Zevi, A. Claridge (Edd.): Roman Ostia Revisited: Archaeological and Historical Papers in Memory of Russell Meiggs . Pp. Xix + 307, Ills. London: British School at Rome in Collaboration with the Soprintendenza Archeologica di Ostia, 1996. ISBN: 0-904152-29-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (01):220-.score: 30.0
  47. A. BugAiska, D. Clarys, C. Jarry, L. Taconnat, G. Tapia, S. VanneSte & M. Isingrini (2007). The Effect of Aging in Recollective Experience: The Processing Speed and Executive Functioning Hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):797-808.score: 30.0
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  48. Ray Laurence (2002). J. De Felice: Roman Hospitality: The Professional Women of Pompeii. Pp. 306, Ills. Pennsylvania: Shangri La Publications, 2001. Paper, $26. ISBN: 0-9677201-8-4 (0-9677201-7-6 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):390-.score: 30.0
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  49. Ray Laurence (2006). Ling (R.), Ling (L.) The Insula of the Menander at Pompeii. Volume II: The Decorations. Pp. Xxii + 541, Figs, Ills, B/W & Colour Pls. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Cased, £175. ISBN: 0-19-926695-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):475-.score: 30.0
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  50. Ray Laurence (2007). Sear (F.) Roman Theatres: An Architectural Study. Pp. Xl + 468, Ills, Maps, Pls. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Cased, £195. ISBN: 978-0-19-814469-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02).score: 30.0
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