Search results for 'Law and economic development' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  35
    Augustine Nwabuzor (2005). Corruption and Development: New Initiatives in Economic Openness and Strengthened Rule of Law. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):121 - 138.
    Corruption is a major problem in many of the world’s developing economies today. World Bank studies put bribery at over $1 trillion per year accounting for up to 12 of the GDP of nations like Nigeria, Kenya and Venezuela. Though largely ignored for many years, interest in world wide corruption has been rekindled by recent corporate scandals in the US and Europe. Corruption in the developing nations is said to result from a number of factors. Mass poverty has been cited (...)
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  2.  1
    David Kennedy (2004). FIVE The Rule of Law as a Strategy for Economic Development. In The Dark Sides of Virtue: Reassessing International Humanitarianism. Princeton University Press 149-168.
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  3.  18
    Jennifer Beard (2006). The Political Economy of Desire: International Law, Development and the Nation State. Routledge-Cavendish.
    This book offers an intelligent and thought-provoking analysis of the genealogy of Western capitalist 'development'. Jennifer Beard departs from the common position that development and underdevelopment are conceptual outcomes of the Imperialist Era and positions the genealogy of development within early Christian writings in which the western theological concepts of sin, salvation, and redemption are expounded. In doing so, she links the early Christian writings of theologians such as Augustine and , Anselm and Abelard to the processes (...)
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  4. Katerina Kocevska (2015). Rule Of Law – Condition For Economic Development. Seeu Review 11 (1):183-196.
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  5. Augustine Nwabuzor (2005). Corruption and Development: New Initiatives in Economic Openness and Strengthened Rule of Law. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):121-138.
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  6. Simona Selelionytė-Drukteinienė (2009). Pure Economic Loss as a Special Kind of Loss in Lithuanian Tort Law. Jurisprudence 118 (4):123-146.
    In tort law, including Lithuanian tort law, damage usually is divided into two types: pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage. The concept of non-pecuniary damage has recently become a focus of attention of Lithuanian legal researchers. However, it has to be noted that the issues related to the concept of pecuniary damage remain scarcely analysed. As a result, the unique type of pecuniary damage, i.e. the damage of purely economic character, has received no attention whatsoever in Lithuanian tort law. It is (...)
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  7.  5
    Jody S. Kraus, Transparency and Determinacy in Common Law Adjudication: A Philosophical Defense of Explanatory Economic Analysis.
    Explanatory economic analysis of the common law has long been subject to deep philosophical skepticism for two reasons. First, common law decisions appear to be cast in the language of deontic morality, not the consequentialist language of efficiency. For this reason, philosophers have claimed that explanatory economic analysis cannot satisfy the transparency criterion, which holds that a legal theory's explanation must provide a plausible account of the relationship between the reasoning it claims judges actually use to decide cases (...)
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  8.  36
    Douglas W. Arner, Financial Stability, Economic Growth, and the Role of Law.
    Financial crises have become an all-too-common occurrence over the past twenty years, largely as a result of changes in finance brought about by increasing internationalization and integration. As domestic financial systems and economies become more interlinked, weaknesses can significantly impact not only individual economies but also markets, financial intermediaries and economies around the world. This volume addresses the twin objectives of financial development in the context of financial stability and the role of law in supporting both. Financial stability (frequently (...)
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  9.  4
    Grady Jessup (2006). Development Law: Squaring the Circle, Advancing Human Rights in Africa. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 7 (3):96-111.
    Development law is an ethos-driven law reform paradigm that examines conditions from within the country and provides a frame of reference in which to evaluate the legal regime in the political, economic, social and cultural context. Moreover, development law provides a fresh approach to assessing existing national laws effectiveness generally; it assesses whether modifications are required to promote economic, political, and social progress, including protecting the rights of minority ethnic groups and disenfranchised peoples. By protecting rights, (...)
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  10.  7
    Brian Z. Tamanaha, Caroline Mary Sage & Michael J. V. Woolcock (eds.) (2012). Legal Pluralism and Development: Scholars and Practitioners in Dialogue. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Origins and Contours: 1. Historical perspectives on legal pluralism Lauren Benton; 2. The rule of law and legal pluralism in development Brian Z. Tamanaha; 3. Bendable rules: the development implications of human rights pluralism David Kinley; 4. Legal pluralism and legal culture: mapping the terrain Sally Engle Merry; 5. Towards equity in development when the law is not the law: reflections on legal pluralism in practice Daniel Adler and So Sokbunthouen; Part (...)
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  11.  2
    Susan Randolph, Michelle Prairie & John Stewart (2012). Monitoring State Fulfillment of Economic and Social Rights Obligations in the United States. Human Rights Review 13 (2):139-165.
    This article adapts the economic and social rights fulfillment index (SERF Index) developed by Fukuda-Parr, Lawson-Remer, and Randolph to assess the extent to which each of the 50 US states fulfills the economic and social rights obligations set forth in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. It then extends the index to incorporate discrimination and examines differences in economic and social rights fulfillment by race and sex within each of the states. The overall (...)
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  12.  10
    S. Prakash Sethi, David B. Lowry, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova (2011). Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold, Inc.: An Innovative Voluntary Code of Conduct to Protect Human Rights, Create Employment Opportunities, and Economic Development of the Indigenous People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):1-30.
    Environmental degradation and extractive industry are inextricably linked, and the industry’s adverse impact on air, water, and ground resources has been exacerbated with increased demand for raw materials and their location in some of the more environmentally fragile areas of the world. Historically, companies have managed to control calls for regulation and improved, i.e., more expensive, mining technologies by (a) their importance in economic growth and job creation or (b) through adroit use of their economic power and bargaining (...)
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  13.  19
    Josep F. Mària & Daniel Arenas (2009). Societal Ethos and Economic Development Organizations in Nicaragua. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):231 - 244.
    This article analyzes efforts in Nicaragua to create ethical organizations and an ethical economy. Three societal ethea found in contemporary Nicaragua are examined: the ethos of revolution, the ethos of corruption, and the ethos of human development. The emerging ethos of human development provides the most hope for the nation's social and economic evolution. The practices of three successful economic development organizations explicitly aligned with the ethos of human development are described and evaluated: (1) (...)
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  14. Guanghua Yu (2011). Fa Lü de Zuo Yong: Bu Tong Li Lun Shi Jiao de Tan Tao = the Role of Law: Alternative Theoretical Approaches. Fa Lü Chu Ban She.
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  15. Margot E. Salomon & Foreword by Stephen P. Marks (2007). Global Responsibility for Human Rights: World Poverty and the Development of International Law. OUP Oxford.
    Challenges to the exercise of the basic socio-economic rights of half the global population give rise to some of the most pressing issues today. This timely book focuses on world poverty, providing a systematic exposition of the evolving legal responsibility of the international community of states to cooperate in addressing the structural obstacles that contribute to this injustice. This book analyzes the approach, contribution, and current limitations of the international law of human rights to the manifestations of world poverty, (...)
     
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  16.  35
    P. J. Kelly (1989). Utilitarianism and Distributive Justice: The Civil Law and the Foundations of Bentham's Economic Thought. Utilitas 1 (1):62.
    Between 1787, and the end of his life in 1832, Bentham turned his attention to the development and application of economic ideas and principles within the general structure of his legislative project. For seventeen years this interest was manifested through a number of books and pamphlets, most of which remained in manuscript form, that develop a distinctive approach to economic questions. Although Bentham was influenced by Adam Smith's An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth (...)
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  17. Margot E. Salomon (2007). Global Responsibility for Human Rights: World Poverty and the Development of International Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Challenges to the exercise of the basic socio-economic rights of half the global population give rise to some of the most pressing issues today. This timely book focuses on world poverty, providing a systematic exposition of the evolving legal responsibility of the international community of states to cooperate in addressing the structural obstacles that contribute to this injustice. This book analyzes the approach, contribution, and current limitations of the international law of human rights to the manifestations of world poverty, (...)
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  18.  33
    Yves Dezalay & Bryant G. Garth (eds.) (2002). Global Prescriptions: The Production, Exportation, and Importation of a New Legal Orthodoxy. University of Michigan Press.
    Global Prescriptions scrutinizes the movement to export a U.S.-oriented version of the " rule of law," found in the activities of philanthropic foundations, the World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and several other developmental organizations. Yves Dezalay and Bryant G. Garth have brought together a group of scholars from a variety of disciplines--anthropology, economics, history, law, political science, and sociology--to create tools for understanding this movement. Comprised of two sections, the volume first develops theoretical perspectives key to (...)
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  19. Sami Al-Daghistani (forthcoming). Semiotics of Islamic Law, Maṣlaḥa, and Islamic Economic Thought. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-16.
    The paper explores the role and meaning of maṣlaḥa and its possible appropriation in the field of Islamic legal and economic thought, as laid down by various medieval and contemporary Muslim scholars. Questions that are pertinent to the research are the following: how has maṣlaḥa been incorporated in legal reasoning and what kind of meaning does it convey; what type of economic reading does it presuppose; do ethics, law, and scriptural sources play equally important role as reference in (...)
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  20.  2
    Manuela Galetto (2009). Territorial Pacts in Socio-Economic and Law Literature. Polis 23 (3):481-504.
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  21.  43
    Symphorien Ntibagirirwa (2009). Cultural Values, Economic Growth and Development. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):297 - 311.
    Neo-liberal economics is built upon the claim that the freedom to pursue one's self-interest and rational choice leads to economic growth and development. Against this background neo-liberal economists and policymakers endeavoured to universalise this claim, and insistently argue that appropriate economic policies produce the same results regardless of cultural values. Accordingly, developing countries are often advised to embrace the neo-liberal economic credo for them to escape from the trap of underdevelopment. However, the economic success of (...)
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  22.  2
    Liu Ruifu (1986). On the Methodology of Philosophy and the Establishment of a Scientific System of Economic Law. Contemporary Chinese Thought 18 (1):3-27.
    Editor's Note: There seems to be a tendency within our scholarly circles to place relatively greater emphasis on the lines of distinction between disciplines or the drawing of lines of differences among spheres [of knowledge], rather than on the connection, contact, and intersection of disciplines. Consequently, in research activities there is a commensurate tendency to often concentrate one's vision on the narrow world of one's own sphere and rarely to pay any attention to the conditions of "one's neighbors." The result (...)
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  23.  7
    Chi Carmody, Frank J. Garcia & John Linarelli (eds.) (2011). Global Justice and International Economic Law: Opportunities and Prospects. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume reflects the results of a symposium held at Tillar House, the ASIL headquarters in Washington, DC, in November 2008 which brought together philosophers, legal scholars, and economists to discuss the problems of understanding ...
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  24.  2
    Jennifer Oetzel, Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Charles Koerber, Timothy L. Fort & Jorge Rivera (2009). Business and Peace: Sketching the Terrain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):351 - 373.
    Our goals in this article are to summarize the existing literature on the role business can play in creating sustainable peace and to discuss important avenues for extending this research. As part of our discussion, we review the ethical arguments and related research made to date, including the rationale and motivation for businesses to engage in conflict resolution and peace building, and discuss how scholars are extending research in this area. We also focus on specific ways companies can actively engage (...)
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  25.  15
    Yu-Shu Peng & Shing-Shiuan Lin (2009). National Culture, Economic Development, Population Growth and Environmental Performance: The Mediating Role of Education. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):203 - 219.
    Literature on ethical behavior has paid little attention to the mechanism between macro-environmental variables and environmental performance. This study aims at constructing a model to examine the relationships which link cultural values, population growth, economic development, and environmental performance by incorporating the mediating role of education. The multiple linear regression model was employed to test the hypotheses on a 3-year-pooled sample of 51 countries. Empirical results conclude that national culture, economic development, and population growth would significantly (...)
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  26.  17
    Jang B. Singh & Emily F. Carasco (1996). Business Ethics, Economic Development and Protection of the Environment in the New World Order. Journal of Business Ethics 15 (3):297 - 307.
    The end of the cold war has elevated environmental issues to the highest level of concern for humanity while creating a world order dominated by the United States of America and other Western nations. This new power structure may likely lead to increased business activity in many parts of the world, as nations formerly preoccupied with the cold war turn their attention to economic development. This paper examines the linkages among ethics, economic development and protection and (...)
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  27.  9
    Irena Ristic (2005). Religion as a Factor of Political Culture and Economic Development. Filozofija I Društvo 28:145-161.
    In his essay “The Protestant Ethic” Max Weber explains the specific economic development and the foundation of capitalism in Western Europe due to the appearance of protestant sects and the “spirit of capitalism”. By doing so, Weber assigns religion a significant place among the factors of social and economic development. Taking Weber’s theory and argumentation as a starting point, this article drafts a thesis on “orthodox ethic” and determines its role in the development of the (...)
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  28.  6
    Andy Griffiths & Allan Williams (1992). Culture, Regional Image, and Economic Development in the United Kingdom. World Futures 33 (1):105-120.
    (1992). Culture, regional image, and economic development in the United Kingdom. World Futures: Vol. 33, Culture and Development: European Experiences and Challenges A Special Research Report of the European Culture Impact Research Consortium (EUROCIRCON), pp. 105-120.
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  29.  6
    Maria Sagi (1992). Culture and Lifestyle as a Framework for Economic Development in Hungary. World Futures 33 (1):133-142.
    (1992). Culture and lifestyle as a framework for economic development in Hungary. World Futures: Vol. 33, Culture and Development: European Experiences and Challenges A Special Research Report of the European Culture Impact Research Consortium (EUROCIRCON), pp. 133-142.
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  30.  7
    Linda M. Sama (2006). Economic Development Management and CSR. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:158-163.
    This paper examines the association between level of economic development and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in a country, with speculations on howadvances in economic development may alter the scope and application of CSR activities. Through the empowerment of local communities and the intersection of ethical leadership approaches of business, local governments and civil society, remedies are suggested for improved economic development management.
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  31.  6
    Thomas L. Daniels (1991). The Goals and Values of Local Economic Development Strategies in Rural America. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (3):3-9.
    The goals and values of economic development strategies vary according to the individual communities that employ them. While economic development strategies are aimed at increasing jobs, income, and community wealth, the issue of who gains and who loses from economic change is often overlooked. The industrial development strategies of the 1960s and 1970s are giving way to local initiatives based on services. Although local efforts may mean greater local control, the globalization of the economy (...)
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  32.  5
    Cornelia Flora, Jan L. Flora, Gary P. Green & Frederick E. Schmidt (1991). Rural Economic Development Through Local Self-Development Strategies. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (3):19-24.
    During the 1980s many communities turned to grassroots activities to promote economic development, rather than relying on industrial recruitment strategies. We evaluate the characteristics of these projects, their benefits and costs, and obstacles they face in the development process. The data are drawn from a survey of more than one hundred communities in the United States. Self-development efforts do not appear to replace traditional rural economic development activities, but may complement them. Self-development activities (...)
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  33.  2
    Ian Inkster (1991). Science, Technology and Economic Development—Japanese Historical Experience in Context. Annals of Science 48 (6):545-563.
    Often enough, the uniqueness of Japanese economic history has been analysed in terms of overarching ‘cultural’ imperatives. The following paper utilizes key episodes in the transition of the Japanese economy in order to suggest that its impetus lay in the political economy of the nation's relations with Western science and technology and the subsequent developments whereby technological change became institutionalized. The power of the Japanese State—forged from a heady mixture of relative backwardness, fear, and militarism—was a necessary feature of (...)
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  34.  4
    Peter B. Meyer & Michael Burayidi (1991). Is Value Conflict Inherent in Rural Economic Development? An Exploratory Examination of Unrecognized Choices. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (3):10-18.
    Rural development and economic change has generally been associated with growth and the in-migration of nonlocal firms or their branch plants and offices. Such change has been critiqued and at times resisted because of its implicit “urbanism” and conflict with rural values and modes of social interaction. The inevitability of the conflict has always been assumed, given the perspectives of development groups and many rural residents. This paper examines the apparent conflicts between the rural ethos and the (...)
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  35.  3
    Brian J. Reichel, Paul Lasley, William F. Woodman & I. I. Shelley (1988). Economic Development and Biotechnology: Public Policy Response to the Farm Crisis in Iowa. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):15-25.
    In periods of social crisis, policymakers become particularly vulnerable to interest groups mobilizing to compete for scarce funds. At this point, legislators are no longer able to address the specific needs of their primary constituency directly, but rather are forced to do so in pretext only. New, unfamiliar technologies provide ample ammunition for astute interest groups to take advantage of times of economic turmoil and maneuver for policy support through dramatic campaigns of “salesmanship.” By publicizing a crisis situation, dramatizing (...)
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  36.  3
    John J. Waelti (1990). Agricultural Economists, Human Capital, and Economic Development: How Colleges of Agriculture Can Assist. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 7 (3-4):95-100.
    Of the requisites for economic development, human capital is the most “policy-proof,” is the one which developed nations can most effectively render on large scale, and is that which American colleges of Agriculture are uniquely equipped to render. Graduate study in agricultural economics is a popular choice of third world students as it occupies a pivotal position between agricultural science and the liberal arts, giving it substantial relevance to economic development. It is necessary to understand the (...)
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  37.  7
    Paul Keating (1992). Entrepreneurship and Economic Development in Ireland: Does Culture Matter? World Futures 33 (1):35-48.
    (1992). Entrepreneurship and economic development in Ireland: Does culture matter? World Futures: Vol. 33, Culture and Development: European Experiences and Challenges A Special Research Report of the European Culture Impact Research Consortium (EUROCIRCON), pp. 35-48.
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  38.  6
    Harry J. van Buren Iii & Jeanne M. Logsdon (2006). Stages of Economic Development, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Civil Society. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:170-172.
    This paper begins to examine the question of where societal expectations about the nature of corporate social responsibility come from. In particular, we begin to consider arguments about how a country’s stage of economic development affects the kinds of social responsibility expectations that firms face and then how the nature of a country’s civil society might affect CSR expectations. The factors that should be taken into account for future empirical research are also considered.
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  39.  3
    Chairperson György Kerékgyártó (2008). Integration and Disintegration Trends in European Economic Development. The European Legacy 1 (2):474-478.
    (1996). Integration and disintegration trends in European economic development. The European Legacy: Vol. 1, Fourth International Conference of the International Society for the study of European Ideas, pp. 474-478.
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  40.  12
    Stephen J. DeCanio (1992). Carbon Rights and Economic Development. Critical Review 6 (2-3):389-410.
    Even in the absence of complete scientific consensus on the magnitude, timing, and regional distribution of the effects of global warming caused by greenhouse gas emissions, it is worthwhile to examine potential policy responses to the prospect of climate change. An internalization of the greenhouse externality based on property rights in carbon emissions offers the potential to promote rather than retard worldwide economic development. As the world economy moves in a market?oriented direction, the arbitrary wealth transfers associated with (...)
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  41.  4
    Jerry D. Stubben (1991). American Indian Values and Their Impact on Tribal Economic Development. Agriculture and Human Values 8 (3):53-62.
    This study uses 1990 data from seventy-three American Indian tribes to explore factors associated with the adoption of indi genous economic development plans on American Indian reservations. The analyses employing ordinary least squares analytical models posit that the existence of tribally owned and controlled businesses on or near the reservations and the presence of tribally owned farm and ranch operations are most critical in explaining the existence of such plans. A closer scrutiny of this result further suggests that (...)
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  42.  1
    Lukwikilu C. Mangay (2014). Mission as Local Economic Development in the City of Tshwane: Towards Fostering a Grass Roots, 'Glocal' Alternative Vision, with Specific Reference to Luke 16:19-31. [REVIEW] Hts Theological Studies 70 (3):01-09.
    This article analyses and reflects missiologically on the City of Tshwane's economy, in terms of its priorities and strategies. It points out that it is to the detriment of local communities that Tshwane's economy has become a replica of the national economy which is essentially growth-focused and structured to service the global market. It also discusses possibilities for the urban church to be involved in addressing this situation as it wrestles with the question: What role can the church play towards (...)
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  43.  2
    Earl Picard (1984). The New Black Economic Development Strategy. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (60):53-64.
    Throughout the twentieth century black economic development strategies have been hampered by a failure to address the basic liberatory impulse of the black community. By that I mean there has been a disjunction between the essential developmental seeds of the community, many of which can be spelled out in fairly precise terms, and the programs and achievements of economic development strategists. This problem is demonstrated in the longstanding wretched conditions faced by the majority of black people1 (...)
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  44. Masahiko Aoki & The Late Yujiro Hayami (eds.) (2000). Communities and Markets in Economic Development. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This volume presents historical, contemporary, and theoretical perspectives on the role of local communities and social norms in the economic development process. Using historical evidence combined with recent developments in institutional economics involving game theory and contracts, it establishes that communities can enhance the development of a market economy under certain circumstances -- and sheds light on what those circumstances are.
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  45. Masahiko Aoki, Hyung-Ki Kim & Masahiro Okuno-Fujiwara (eds.) (1998). The Role of Government in East Asian Economic Development: Comparative Institutional Analysis. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The role of government in East Asian economic development has been a contentious issue. Two competing views have shaped enquiries into the source of the rapid growth of the high-performing Asian economies and attempts to derive a general lesson for other developing economies: the market-friendly view, according to which government intervenes little in the market, and the developmental state view, in which it governs the market. What these views share in common is a conception of market and government (...)
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  46. Chris Bramall (2008). Chinese Economic Development. Routledge.
    This book outlines and analyzes the economic development of China between 1949 and 2007. Rather than being narrowly economic, the book addresses many of the broader aspects of development, including literacy, morality, demographics and the environment. The distinctive features of this book are its sweep and that it does not shy away from controversial issues. For example, there is no question that aspects of Maoism were disastrous but Bramall argues that there was another side to the (...)
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  47. Ferenc Jánossy (2016). The End of the Economic Miracle: Appearance and Reality in Economic Development. Routledge.
    Originally published in 1971, this report presents Dr Jánossy’s attempt to demonstrate that all post-war economic ‘miracles’ lasted only until production levels reached the levels they should have done had there been no war and concludes that economic development is extremely consistent. Jánossy also provides a detailed growth theory which suggests that this consistency is reached purely by the development of mankind and occupational structure rather than research or capital development. This title will be of (...)
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  48. Bertin Martens (2004). The Cognitive Mechanics of Economic Development and Institutional Change. Routledge.
    This book seeks to explain long-term economic development and institutional change in terms of the cognitive features of human learning and communication processes. Martens links individual cognitive processes to macroeconomic growth theories, including economies of scale and scope, and to theories of institutional development based on asymmetric information in production processes and economies of scale in enforcement technology. With considerable flair, Bertin Martens has applied the hot new area of psychological and behavioural economics to notions of growth (...)
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  49. Giorgio Monestarolo (2006). The Project of a Commercial State: Ignazio Donaudi and the Question of Piedmontese Economic Development. History of European Ideas 32 (4):477-501.
    Through a discussion of a number of unpublished manuscripts by the undervalued Ignazio Donaudi, the complexities of the Piedmontese political and economic situation of the latter decades of the eighteenth century are presented. Donaudi argued that as a result of the late seventeenth-century ‘Colbertist’ policies of Vittorio Amedeo II Piedmontese economic development had come to a halt. In the mid-eighteenth-century, a sectoral imbalance in the economy corresponded to a political system in which manufacturer entrepreneurs and their financiers (...)
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  50. Ramprasad Sengupta (ed.) (2013). Ecological Limits and Economic Development: Creating Space. Oxford University Press India.
    This book presents a comprehensive coverage of the role of ecological constraints in limiting the availability of natural resources for economic development. It discusses in detail the notion of sustainable development, the concept of ecological footprints, and population theory. It also analyses how the development of technology, policies, and institutions can relax these constraints in the context of major resources. The analytical discussion is carried out both at the conceptual and theoretical level and also at the (...)
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