Search results for 'Law, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Harold J. Johnson (ed.) (1987). The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law. Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University.score: 132.0
     
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  2. Donald R. Kelley (1984). History, Law, and the Human Sciences: Medieval and Renaissance Perspectives. Variorum Reprints.score: 132.0
     
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  3. John Kilcullen, Medieval Theories of Natural Law.score: 96.0
    In medieval texts the term ius naturale can mean either natural law or natural right; for the latter sense see the article Natural Rights ”. Ius naturale in the former sense, and also lex naturalis, mean the universal and immutable law to which the laws of human legislators, the customs of particular communities and the actions of individuals ought to conform. It is equivalent to morality thought of as a system of law. It is called “natural” either (a) because (...)
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  4. Jean Porter (1996). Contested Categories: Reason, Nature, and Natural Order in Medieval Accounts of the Natural Law. Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (2):207 - 232.score: 96.0
    When we approach medieval writings on the natural law in terms of our contemporary interpretations of such basic categories as reason, nature, and natural order, these writings are bound to seem confused, incomplete, and unsophisticated. Yet if we allow these writings to speak in their own terms, respecting the integrity of their thought, a different picture emerges. We find there an account of the natural law which is significantly different from any contemporary version. This account is illuminating precisely because (...)
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  5. David VanDrunen (2006). Medieval Natural Law and the Reformation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (1):77-98.score: 96.0
    An important aspect of the contemporary controversies over John Calvin’s natural law doctrine has been his relation to the medieval natural law inheritance. This paper attempts to put Calvin in better context through a detailed examination of his ideas on natural law, in comparison with those of Thomas Aquinas. I argue that significant points of both similarity and difference between them must berecognized. Among important similarities, I highlight their grounding of natural law in the divine nature and the relationship (...)
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  6. Donald R. Davis (1999). Recovering the Indigenous Legal Traditions of India: Classical Hindu Law in Practice in Late Medieval Kerala. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 27 (3):159-213.score: 96.0
    The collection of Malayalam records entitled Vanjeri Grandhavari, taken from the archives of an important Namputiri Brahmin family and the temple under its leadership, provides some long-awaited information regarding a wide range of legal activities in late medieval Kerala. The organization of law and the jurisprudence represented by these records bear an unmistakable similarity to legal ideas found in dharmastra texts. A thorough comparison of the records and relevant dharma texts shows that landholding Namputiri Brahmins, who possessed enormous political (...)
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  7. Gifford A. Grobien (2011). What is the Natural Law? : Medieval Foundations and Luther's Approbation. In Robert C. Baker & Roland Cap Ehlke (eds.), Natural Law: A Lutheran Reappraisal. Concordia Pub. House.score: 96.0
     
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  8. Jonathan Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. OUP Oxford.score: 96.0
    The medieval Jewish philosophers Saadia Gaon, Bahya ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides made significant contributions to moral philosophy in ways that remain relevant today. -/- Jonathan Jacobs explicates shared, general features of the thought of these thinkers and also highlights their distinctive contributions to understanding moral thought and moral life. The rationalism of these thinkers is a key to their views. They argued that seeking rational understanding of Torah>'s commandments and the created order is crucial to fulfilling the covenant (...)
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  9. Brian Tierney (1997). Rights, Laws, and Infallibility in Medieval Thought. Variorum.score: 96.0
  10. Brandt Dainow (2013). What Can a Medieval Friar Teach Us About the Internet? Deriving Criteria of Justice for Cyberlaw From Thomist Natural Law Theory. Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):459-476.score: 90.0
    This paper applies a very traditional position within Natural Law Theory to Cyberspace. I shall first justify a Natural Law approach to Cyberspace by exploring the difficulties raised by the Internet to traditional principles of jurisprudence and the difficulties this presents for a Positive Law Theory account of legislation of Cyberspace. This will focus on issues relating to geography. I shall then explicate the paradigm of Natural Law accounts, the Treatise on Law, by Thomas Aquinas. From this account will emerge (...)
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  11. Brian Feltham (2012). Between Practical Wisdom and Natural Law: Medieval Jewish Ethics. Ratio 25 (1):118-125.score: 90.0
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  12. Hariścandra Vijayatuṅga (2008). Legal Philosophy in Medieval Siṅhalē: A Historical Evaluation of Law in Medieval Sri Lanka. Godage International Publishers.score: 84.0
     
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  13. Francis Oakley (1984). Natural Law, Conciliarism, and Consent in the Late Middle Ages: Studies in Ecclesiastical and Intellectual History. Variorum Reprints.score: 78.0
     
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  14. Frederik Pedersen (1994). Did the Medieval Laity Know the Canon Law Rules on Marriage? Some Evidence From Fourteenth-Century York Cause Papers. Mediaeval Studies 56 (1):111-152.score: 76.0
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  15. Matthias Schemmel (2014). Medieval Representations of Change and Their Early Modern Application. Foundations of Science 19 (1):11-34.score: 72.0
    The article investigates the role of symbolic means of knowledge representation in concept development using the historical example of medieval diagrams of change employed in early modern work on the motion of fall. The parallel cases of Galileo Galilei, Thomas Harriot, and René Descartes and Isaac Beeckman are discussed. It is argued that the similarities concerning the achievements as well as the shortcomings of their respective work on the motion of fall can to a large extent be attributed to (...)
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  16. Jonathan A. Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: [Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides]. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Jon Jacobs emphasises their distinctive contributions, emphasises the shared rational emphasis of their approach to Torah, and draws out resonances with ...
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  17. Mikael Aktor (2002). Rules of Untouchability in Ancient and Medieval Law Books: Householders, Competence, and Inauspiciousness. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 6 (3):243-274.score: 72.0
  18. Virpi Makinen & Heikki Pihlajamaki (2004). The Individualization of Crime in Medieval Canon Law. Journal of the History of Ideas 65 (4):525-542.score: 72.0
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  19. A. Claire Cutler (2001). Globalization, the Rule of Law, and the Modern Law Merchant: Medieval or Late Capitalist Associations? Constellations 8 (4):480-502.score: 72.0
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  20. R. N. Swanson (2006). Power Over the Body, Equality in the Family: Rights and Domestic Relations in Medieval Canon Law by Charles J. Reid, Jr. Heythrop Journal 47 (4):638–639.score: 72.0
  21. Myer Bernard Barr (1932/1982). Studies in Social and Legal Theories: An Historical Account of the Social, Ethical, Political, and Legal Doctrines of the Foremost Ancient and Medieval Philosophers. F.B. Rothman & Co..score: 72.0
    The author attempted to present the development of legal theories through early & medieval philosophical history.
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  22. Lenn E. Goodman (2011). Jacobs , Jonathan . Law, Reason and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadiah Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 256. $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (4):812-816.score: 72.0
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  23. John A. Trentman (1978). Bad Names: A Linguistic Argument in Late Medieval Natural Law Theories. Noûs 12 (1):29-39.score: 72.0
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  24. Gerald Groveland Walsh (1930). Political Theory and Law in Medieval Spain. Thought 5 (3):519-523.score: 72.0
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  25. Greta Austin (2011). Christof Rolker, Canon Law and the Letters of Ivo of Chartres. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought, 4th Ser., 76.) Cambridge, Eng., and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. Xiii, 386; Tables. $110. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):544-545.score: 72.0
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  26. Piers Beirnes (1994). The Law is an Ass: Reading E.P. Evans' The Medieval Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals. Society and Animals 2 (1):27-46.score: 72.0
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  27. Peter P. Cvek (1988). Harold J. Johnson, Ed., The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (1):22-24.score: 72.0
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  28. Eric Kemp (1948). The Medieval Idea of Law as Represented by Lucas de Penna. A Study in Fourteenth-Century Legal Scholarship. By Walter Ullmann. Philosophy 23 (85):183-.score: 72.0
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  29. Norman Jones (2009). Barbara A. Hanawalt, The Wealth of Wives: Women, Law, and Economy in Late Medieval London. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. Xiv, 317; Black-and-White Figures and 1 Table. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (2):443-444.score: 72.0
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  30. Per Andersen (2012). Vogt, The Function of Kinship in Medieval Nordic Legislation. (Medieval Law and Its Practice 9.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xix, 281; Maps. $168. ISBN: 9789004189225. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (4):1261-1262.score: 72.0
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  31. A. D. M. Barrell (2011). Cynthia J. Neville, Land, Law and People in Medieval Scotland. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010. Pp. Viii, 256; Maps. $105. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):535-536.score: 72.0
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  32. James W. Brodman (1985). Municipal Ransoming Law on the Medieval Spanish Frontier. Speculum 60 (2):318-330.score: 72.0
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  33. James A. Brundage (2010). Jörg Peltzer, Canon Law, Careers and Conquest: Episcopal Elections in Normandy and Greater Anjou, C. 1140–C. 1230. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought, 4th Ser., 71.) Cambridge, Eng., and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. Xvi, 329; Tables and 11 Maps. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (4):1008-1009.score: 72.0
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  34. E. Jane Burns (1994). Kathryn Gravdal, Ravishing Maidens: Writing Rape in Medieval French Literature and Law.(New Cultural Studies Series.) Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991. Pp. X, 192. $29.95 (Cloth); $13.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 69 (1):151-153.score: 72.0
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  35. Robert Eisen (2004). Menachem Lorberbaum, Politics and the Limits of Law: Secularizing the Political in Medieval Jewish Thought. (Contraversions: Jews and Other Differences.) Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2001. Pp. Xiii, 216. $55. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (4):1113-1114.score: 72.0
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  36. Sean Field (2007). Elizabeth Makowski, “A Pernicious Sort of Woman”: Quasi-Religious Women and Canon Lawyers in the Later Middle Ages. (Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Canon Law, 6.) Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2005. Pp. Xxxiii, 170. $44.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (1):207-209.score: 72.0
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  37. Paul Fouracre (1989). Law, Sex and Christian Society in Medieval Europe. History of European Ideas 10 (4):495-496.score: 72.0
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  38. G. Geltner (2011). Sarah Rubin Blanshei, Politics and Justice in Late Medieval Bologna. (Medieval Law and Its Practice, 7.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Ix, 671; Many Tables and 1 Map. $251. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (4):1049-1050.score: 72.0
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  39. R. J. Henle (1990). The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law. Edited by Harold J. Johnson. The Modern Schoolman 67 (3):238-242.score: 72.0
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  40. Thomas Kuehn (2006). Charles J. Reid Jr., Power Over the Body, Equality in the Family: Rights and Domestic Relations in Medieval Canon Law. (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion.) Grand Rapids, Mich., and Cambridge, Eng.: William B. Eerdmans, 2004. Paper. Pp. Xi, 335. $30. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):263-264.score: 72.0
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  41. Ewart Lewis (1940). Natural Law and Expediency in Medieval Political Theory. Ethics 50 (2):144-163.score: 72.0
  42. Patrick Madigan (2012). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. By Jonathan Jacobs. Pp. Xii, 232, Oxford University Press, 2010, £50.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (4):711-711.score: 72.0
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  43. F. Oakley (1961). Medieval Theories of Natural Law: William of Ockham and the Significance of the Voluntarist Tradition. American Journal of Jurisprudence 6 (1):65-83.score: 72.0
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  44. Joshua Parens (2013). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides, by Jonathan Jacobs. Mind 122 (488):1108-1112.score: 72.0
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  45. Kenneth Pennington (2002). JW Tubbs, The Common Law Mind: Medieval and Early Modern Conceptions. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. Pp. Xv, 253. $42.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (3):1007-1009.score: 72.0
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  46. Lucy K. Pick (2002). Jeremy Cohen, Living Letters of the Law: Ideas of the Jew in Medieval Christianity. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1999. Pp. X, 451; 1 Table. $60 (Cloth); $24.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (3):899-900.score: 72.0
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  47. Patricia Ranft (1999). Elizabeth Makowski, Canon Law and Cloistered Women:“Periculoso” and Its Commentators, 1298–1545.(Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Canon Law, 5.) Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 1997. Pp. X, 150; 1 Black-and-White Facsimile. $46.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (2):454-455.score: 72.0
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  48. John L. Watts (1992). Fundamental Authority in Late Medieval English Law. History of European Ideas 14 (6):881-882.score: 72.0
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  49. Robert W. Barrett (2007). William Perry Marvin, Hunting Law and Ritual in Medieval English Literature. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2006. Pp. Ix, 198. $75. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (3):730-732.score: 72.0
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  50. Joseph Biancalana (2001). Robin Fleming, Domesday Book and the Law: Society and Legal Custom in Early Medieval England. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. Xix, 548; 4 Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $95. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (1):158-159.score: 72.0
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