Search results for 'Law, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Harold J. Johnson (ed.) (1987). The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law. Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University.
     
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  2. Donald R. Kelley (1984). History, Law, and the Human Sciences: Medieval and Renaissance Perspectives. Variorum Reprints.
     
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  3. Gifford A. Grobien (2011). What is the Natural Law? : Medieval Foundations and Luther's Approbation. In Robert C. Baker & Roland Cap Ehlke (eds.), Natural Law: A Lutheran Reappraisal. Concordia Pub. House
     
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  4.  6
    Brian Feltham (2012). Between Practical Wisdom and Natural Law: Medieval Jewish Ethics. Ratio 25 (1):118-125.
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  5.  13
    Donald R. Davis (1999). Recovering the Indigenous Legal Traditions of India: Classical Hindu Law in Practice in Late Medieval Kerala. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 27 (3):159-213.
    The collection of Malayalam records entitled Vanjeri Grandhavari, taken from the archives of an important Namputiri Brahmin family and the temple under its leadership, provides some long-awaited information regarding a wide range of legal activities in late medieval Kerala. The organization of law and the jurisprudence represented by these records bear an unmistakable similarity to legal ideas found in dharmastra texts. A thorough comparison of the records and relevant dharma texts shows that landholding Namputiri Brahmins, who possessed enormous political (...)
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  6.  25
    John Kilcullen, Medieval Theories of Natural Law.
    In medieval texts the term ius naturale can mean either natural law or natural right; for the latter sense see the article Natural Rights ”. Ius naturale in the former sense, and also lex naturalis, mean the universal and immutable law to which the laws of human legislators, the customs of particular communities and the actions of individuals ought to conform. It is equivalent to morality thought of as a system of law. It is called “natural” either (a) because (...)
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  7.  14
    David VanDrunen (2006). Medieval Natural Law and the Reformation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (1):77-98.
    An important aspect of the contemporary controversies over John Calvin’s natural law doctrine has been his relation to the medieval natural law inheritance. This paper attempts to put Calvin in better context through a detailed examination of his ideas on natural law, in comparison with those of Thomas Aquinas. I argue that significant points of both similarity and difference between them must berecognized. Among important similarities, I highlight their grounding of natural law in the divine nature and the relationship (...)
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  8.  7
    Jean Porter (1996). Contested Categories: Reason, Nature, and Natural Order in Medieval Accounts of the Natural Law. Journal of Religious Ethics 24 (2):207 - 232.
    When we approach medieval writings on the natural law in terms of our contemporary interpretations of such basic categories as reason, nature, and natural order, these writings are bound to seem confused, incomplete, and unsophisticated. Yet if we allow these writings to speak in their own terms, respecting the integrity of their thought, a different picture emerges. We find there an account of the natural law which is significantly different from any contemporary version. This account is illuminating precisely because (...)
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  9.  22
    Brandt Dainow (2013). What Can a Medieval Friar Teach Us About the Internet? Deriving Criteria of Justice for Cyberlaw From Thomist Natural Law Theory. Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):459-476.
    This paper applies a very traditional position within Natural Law Theory to Cyberspace. I shall first justify a Natural Law approach to Cyberspace by exploring the difficulties raised by the Internet to traditional principles of jurisprudence and the difficulties this presents for a Positive Law Theory account of legislation of Cyberspace. This will focus on issues relating to geography. I shall then explicate the paradigm of Natural Law accounts, the Treatise on Law, by Thomas Aquinas. From this account will emerge (...)
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  10.  4
    F. Oakley (1961). Medieval Theories of Natural Law: William of Ockham and the Significance of the Voluntarist Tradition. American Journal of Jurisprudence 6 (1):65-83.
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  11. Hariścandra Vijayatuṅga (2008). Legal Philosophy in Medieval Siṅhalē: A Historical Evaluation of Law in Medieval Sri Lanka. Godage International Publishers.
     
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  12.  14
    Piers Beirnes (1994). The Law is an Ass: Reading E.P. Evans' The Medieval Prosecution and Capital Punishment of Animals. Society and Animals 2 (1):27-46.
    In this essay I address a little-known chapter in the lengthy history of crimes against animals. My focus is not crimes committed by humans against animals, as such, but a practical outcome of the seemingly bizarre belief that animals are capable of committing crimes against humans.2 I refer here to the medieval practice whereby animals were prosecuted and punished for their misdeeds, aspects of which readers are likely to have encountered in the work of the historian Robert Darnton.
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  13.  7
    Frederik Pedersen (1994). Did the Medieval Laity Know the Canon Law Rules on Marriage? Some Evidence From Fourteenth-Century York Cause Papers. Mediaeval Studies 56 (1):111-152.
  14.  7
    James W. Brodman (1985). Municipal Ransoming Law on the Medieval Spanish Frontier. Speculum 60 (2):318-330.
    A serious yet unstudied consequence of the Christian-Muslim conflict in medieval Spain was the capture and enslavement of soldiers and civilians. Men, women, and children who were seized on raids, taken in battle, or pirated off ships were regarded by their captors as booty, to be used as slaves or to be sold for profit. Since warfare in twelfth-century Spain pitted Christians against Muslims, the usual prohibitions against enslavement of coreligionists clearly did not apply. For Muslims and Christians alike, (...)
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  15. Jonathan Jacobs (2010). Law, Reason, and Morality in Medieval Jewish Philosophy: Saadia Gaon, Bahya Ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. OUP Oxford.
    A detailed study of the moral philosophy of medieval Jewish thinkers Saadia Gaon, Bahya ibn Pakuda, and Moses Maimonides. Jon Jacobs emphasizes their distinctive contributions, emphasises the shared rational emphasis of their approach to Torah, and draws out resonances with contemporary moral philosophy.
     
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  16. Menachem Lorberbaum (2001). Politics and the Limits of Law Secularizing the Political in Medieval Jewish Thought. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  17.  14
    R. J. Henle (1990). The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law. Edited by Harold J. Johnson. Modern Schoolman 67 (3):238-242.
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  18.  17
    Gerald Groveland Walsh (1930). Political Theory and Law in Medieval Spain. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):519-523.
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  19.  7
    Ivan Boh (1964). The Logical Structure of Medieval Law-Statements. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 38:86-95.
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  20.  5
    Emma Campbell (2006). William E. Burgwinkle, Sodomy, Masculinity, and Law in Medieval Literature: France and England, 1050–1230. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. Xii, 298. $75. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (3):818-820.
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  21.  5
    Mari Isoaho (2012). Ferdinand Feldbrugge, Law in Medieval Russia. (Law in Eastern Europe 59.) Leiden and Boston: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2009. Pp. Xxv, 334. $225. ISBN: 9789004169852. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (2):550-551.
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  22.  4
    Pierre Payer (1979). Prudence and the Principles of Natural Law: A Medieval DevelopmentArticle Author Querypayer Pj [Google Scholar]. Speculum 54 (1):55-70.
    The Virtue of prudence plays a central role in Aristotelian ethical thought, as it does in the early Christian speculation that developed relatively independently of Aristotelian influence. For Aristotle prudence is essential for the determination of the mean of moral virtue; there can be no moral virtue without prudence nor is it possible to be good in the true sense without prudence. Prudence is right reason in matters of human moral action. jQuery.click { event.preventDefault(); }).
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  23.  29
    Mikael Aktor (2002). Rules of Untouchability in Ancient and Medieval Law Books: Householders, Competence, and Inauspiciousness. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 6 (3):243-274.
  24.  3
    Bruce C. Brasington (2011). Greta Austin, Shaping Church Law Around the Year 1000: The “Decretum” of Burchard of Worms.(Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West.) Farnham, Eng., and Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate, 2009. Pp. Xii, 344 Plus Unnumbered Pages; Tables. $124.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (3):725-726.
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  25.  3
    R. H. Helmholz (2008). Alan Cooper, Bridges, Law and Power in Medieval England, 700–1400. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 2006. Pp. Xii, 185; 1 Table, 1 Graph, and 4 Maps. $80. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (2):416-417.
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  26.  3
    Edward Peters (1998). James A. Brundage, Medieval Canon Law. (The Medieval World.) London and New York: Longman, 1995. Pp. Xii, 260; 1 Map. Speculum 73 (4):1121-1123.
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  27.  3
    James Walter (2005). Ava, Ava's New Testament Narratives: “When the Old Law Passed Away,” Trans. James A. Rushing Jr. Kalamazoo, Mich.: Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, for TEAMS, 2003. Paper. Pp. Vii, 235; Black-and-White Figures. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (3):828-829.
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  28.  7
    Thomas Kuehn (2006). Charles J. Reid Jr., Power Over the Body, Equality in the Family: Rights and Domestic Relations in Medieval Canon Law. (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion.) Grand Rapids, Mich., and Cambridge, Eng.: William B. Eerdmans, 2004. Paper. Pp. Xi, 335. $30. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):263-264.
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  29.  12
    Ewart Lewis (1940). Natural Law and Expediency in Medieval Political Theory. Ethics 50 (2):144-163.
  30.  6
    Per Andersen (2012). Vogt, The Function of Kinship in Medieval Nordic Legislation. (Medieval Law and Its Practice 9.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xix, 281; Maps. $168. ISBN: 9789004189225. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (4):1261-1262.
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  31.  6
    Sean Field (2007). Elizabeth Makowski, “A Pernicious Sort of Woman”: Quasi-Religious Women and Canon Lawyers in the Later Middle Ages. (Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Canon Law, 6.) Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2005. Pp. Xxxiii, 170. $44.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (1):207-209.
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  32.  4
    Giulio Silano (1986). Henry Ansgar Kelly, Canon Law and the Archpriest of Hita. (Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 27.) Binghamton: Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York, 1984. Pp. 204. $16. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (3):670-672.
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  33.  5
    Robert W. Barrett (2007). William Perry Marvin, Hunting Law and Ritual in Medieval English Literature. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2006. Pp. Ix, 198. $75. [REVIEW] Speculum 82 (3):730-732.
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  34.  5
    R. J. Henle (1990). The Medieval Tradition of Natural Law. Edited by Harold J. Johnson. Modern Schoolman 67 (3):238-242.
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  35.  2
    Bernard S. Bachrach (1985). Alexander Callander Murray, Germanic Kinship Structure: Studies in Law and Society in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. (Studies and Texts, 65.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1983. Paper. Pp. Xii, 256. $21. [REVIEW] Speculum 60 (4):1003-1004.
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  36.  2
    Abigail Firey (2012). Gregory I. Halfond, Archaeology of Frankish Church Councils, AD 511–768. (Medieval Law and Its Practice, 6.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Xi, 299; 1 Map. $138. ISBN: 978-9004179769. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (1):225-227.
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  37.  2
    Joe Flatman (2011). Robin Ward, The World of the Medieval Shipmaster: Law, Business and the Sea, C.1350–C.1450. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2009. Pp. X, 260; 7 Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $95. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):279-280.
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  38.  2
    John M. Najemy (1996). Laura Ikins Stern, The Criminal Law System of Medieval and Renaissance Florence.(The Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science, 112th Ser., 1.) Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994. Pp. Xxiii, 286; Black-and-White Frontispiece, 4 Tables. $49.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):494-496.
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  39.  2
    Duane J. Osheim (1989). Countrymen and the Law in Late-Medieval Tuscany. Speculum 64 (2):317-337.
    The Curia dei Foretani, or the Court of the Countrymen, of the commune of Lucca was a sort of rural small-claims court. Designed by an urban government to hear minor civil cases which originated in the countryside, it was occupied with the variety of issues that punctuated country life, most especially cases brought by landlords, merchants, and speculators whose living was tied to the rural economy of northwestern Tuscany. The records of the Curia dei Foretani offer an unusual opportunity to (...)
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  40.  2
    Beatrice H. Zedler (1984). Oscar James Brown, Natural Rectitude and Divine Law in Aquinas. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1981. Paper. Pp. Xiv, 210. $15.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 59 (1):228-229.
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  41.  3
    Bruce C. Brasington (2009). Wilfried Hartmann and Kenneth Pennington, Eds., The History of Medieval Canon Law in the Classical Period, 1140-1234: From Gratian to the Decretals of Pope Gregory IX. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2008. Pp. Xiii, 442. $64.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (3):727-728.
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  42.  12
    Virpi Makinen & Heikki Pihlajamaki (2004). The Individualization of Crime in Medieval Canon Law. Journal of the History of Ideas 65 (4):525-542.
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  43.  4
    Norman Jones (2009). Barbara A. Hanawalt, The Wealth of Wives: Women, Law, and Economy in Late Medieval London. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. Pp. Xiv, 317; Black-and-White Figures and 1 Table. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (2):443-444.
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  44.  5
    G. Geltner (2011). Sarah Rubin Blanshei, Politics and Justice in Late Medieval Bologna. (Medieval Law and Its Practice, 7.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Pp. Ix, 671; Many Tables and 1 Map. $251. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (4):1049-1050.
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  45.  4
    Paul Rorem (2011). Franklin T. Harkins, Reading and the Work of Restoration: History and Scripture in the Theology of Hugh of St Victor.(Mediaeval Law and Theology, 2; Studies and Texts, 167.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2009. Pp. Xii, 336. $80. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):212-213.
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  46.  9
    A. Claire Cutler (2001). Globalization, the Rule of Law, and the Modern Law Merchant: Medieval or Late Capitalist Associations? Constellations 8 (4):480-502.
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  47.  3
    Robert Braid (2013). James Davis, Medieval Market Morality: Life, Law and Ethics in the English Marketplace, 1200–1500. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Pp. Xvii, 514; Black-and-White Figures. $105. ISBN: 9781107003439. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (3):778-779.
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  48.  3
    A. D. M. Barrell (2011). Cynthia J. Neville, Land, Law and People in Medieval Scotland. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2010. Pp. Viii, 256; Maps. $105. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):535-536.
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  49.  3
    Lucy K. Pick (2002). Jeremy Cohen, Living Letters of the Law: Ideas of the Jew in Medieval Christianity. Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1999. Pp. X, 451; 1 Table. $60 (Cloth); $24.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 77 (3):899-900.
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  50.  2
    Denise L. Despres (2013). Adrienne Williams Boyarin, Miracles of the Virgin in Medieval England: Law and Jewishness in Marian Legends. Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: D.S. Brewer, 2010. Pp. Xi, 217; 10 B&W Figs. $95. ISBN: 9781843842408. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):260-262.
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