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  1. Lawrence A. Boland (2006). On Reviewing Machine Dreams : Zoomed-in Versus Zoomed-Out. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (4):480-495.
    continues to receive many reviews. Judging by recent reviews, this is a very controversial book. The question considered here is, how can one fairly review a controversial book—particularly when the book is widely popular and, for a history of economic thought book, a best seller? This essay uses Mirowski’s book as a case study to propose one answer for this question. In the process, it will examine how others seem to have answered this question. Key Words: methodology • reviews • (...)
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  2. Lawrence A. Boland (2003). Dealing with Popper in Economic Methodology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (4):479-498.
  3. Lawrence A. Boland (2003). Methodological Criticismvs. Ideology and Hypocrisy. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (4):521-526.
    Milton Friedman's famous methodology essay is one of the most cited in economics literature. There was a time when it was usually cited as a prime example of positivist methodology. But since the publication of my 1979 critique of the critics of his essay, almost everyone now recognizes his essay as a prime example of what I called instrumentalism. Most economists, who when questioned about their views of methodology, will agree with Friedman's instrumentalism but only if Friedman's name is not (...)
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  4. Lawrence A. Boland (2001). Towards a Useful Methodology Discipline. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):3-10.
  5. Lawrence A. Boland (1998). Situational Analysis Beyond Neoclassical Economists. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (4):515-521.
    Until quite recently, some economic methodologists (particularly, those who began their careers in the late 1970s) were of the opinion that Karl Popper was misguided about economics. Some others claimed that Popper said little about economics. Yet, many economics students who began their appreciation of Popper after reading his Open Society and Its Enemies have quickly realized how easy that book is to understand because it is a generalization of neoclassical economics in terms of both methodological individualism and situational analysis. (...)
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  6. David L. Hammes & Lawrence A. Boland (1984). Neoclassical Vs. Classical Economic Models. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (1):107-113.
  7. Lawrence A. Boland (1983). On the Best Strategy for Doing Philosophy of Economics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34 (4):387-392.
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  8. Lawrence A. Boland (1971). Methodology as an Exercise in Economic Analysis. Philosophy of Science 38 (1):105-117.
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  9. Lawrence A. Boland (1970). Conventionalism and Economic Theory. Philosophy of Science 37 (2):239-248.
    Roughly speaking all economists can be divided into two groups--those who agree with Milton Friedman and those who do not. Both groups, however, espouse the view that science is a series of approximations to a demonstrated accord with reality. Methodological controversy in economics is now merely a Conventionalist argument over which comes first--simplicity or generality. Furthermore, this controversy in its current form is not compatible with one important new and up and coming economic (welfare) theory called "the theory of the (...)
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