Search results for 'Lawrence Cross' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  38
    Soheila Mirshekary & Ann D. K. Lawrence (2009). Academic and Business Ethical Misconduct and Cultural Values: A Cross National Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):141-157.
    Efforts to promote ethical behaviour in business and academic contexts have raised awareness of the need for an ethical orientation in business students. This study examines the similarities and differences between the personal values of Iranian and Australian business students and their attitudes to cheating behaviour in universities and unethical practices in business settings. Exploratory factory analysis provided support for three distinct ethics factors—serious academic ethical misconduct, minor academic ethical misconduct, and business ethical misconduct. Results reveal statistically significant differences between (...)
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  2.  2
    Basilio Petra & Lawrence Cross (2010). Developing the Theology of Priesthood: Celibate, Married, or Both? The Australasian Catholic Record 87 (2):187.
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  3.  3
    Lawrence Cross (2006). John Henry Newman. Newman Studies Journal 3 (1):5-11.
    It is often asserted that Newman was an invisible peritus at the Second Vatican Council—in a sense, Newman was a “Father of the Modern Church.” But what does it mean to be a “Father of the Church”? This article reflects on selected aspects of Newman’s thought that were influential at Vatican II and continue to be important today.
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  4.  2
    Lawrence C. Perlmuter, Richard A. Monty & Peter M. Cross (1974). Choice as a Disrupter of Performance in Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (1):170.
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  5. Bj Lawrence Cross (2005). Complementarity of the Churches: Catholic and Orthodox in an Exchange of Spiritual Treasures. The Australasian Catholic Record 82 (1):59.
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  6.  2
    Carmen Lawrence (2015). Dr Lawrence's Acceptance Speech: Australia's Indigenous Heritage. Australian Humanist, The 119:2.
    Lawrence, Carmen Why should we protect our heritage? In the broadest sense our heritage is what we inherit; it's what we value of that inheritance and what we decide to keep and protect for future generations. Heritage is both global enough to encompass our shock at the destruction of the Buddhas of Bamiyan in Afghanistan and as local as our own sepia-tinted family photographs. Everything which our predecessors have bequeathed, both tangible and intangible, may be called heritage - (...)
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  7.  6
    Marilyn McCord Adams & Richard Cross (2005). Richard Cross. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):53-72.
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  8.  5
    Mark Lawrence (forthcoming). Mark Lawrence 97. Journal of Thought.
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  9.  3
    Pauline Allen & Wendy Mayer (2004). Luigi Alici, Remo Piccolomini, and Antonio Pieretti, Eds., Esistenza E Libertà: Agostino Nella Filosofia Del Novecento/1, Rome: Città Nuova, 2000. Pauline Allen, Raymond Canning, and Lawrence Cross, Eds., Prayer and Spiritu-Ality in the Early Church (First Conference on Prayer and Spirituality, 1996), Brisbane: Centre for Early Christian Studies, 1998. [REVIEW] Augustinian Studies 35 (2).
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  10.  10
    Dorota Czyżowska & Adam Niemczyński (1996). Universality of Socio‐Moral Development: A Cross‐Sectional Study in Poland. Journal of Moral Education 25 (4):441-453.
    Abstract Lawrence Kohlberg's theory postulates a universal model of moral development. According to Kohlberg's cognitive?development theory, moral judgement represents underlying thought organisation rather than specific responses. Although the specific content of moral judgement may vary among cultures, the basic structures are said to be universal. Our cross?sectional study has been undertaken to test the validity of Kohlberg's measure in a Polish sample. The data were gathered between 1985?87. The sample includes 291 men and women, 15?80 years of age. (...)
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  11.  1
    Lawrence Prybil, Mary Charlton & Peter Roberts (2006). The Wellmark and University of Iowa Partnership: An Innovative Model for Collaboration Between Blue Cross-Blue Shield Plans and Colleges. Inquiry 43 (4):309-314.
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  12. Lawrence Nees (2015). Juliet Mullins, Jenifer Ní Ghrádaig, and Richard Hawtree, Eds., Envisioning Christ on the Cross: Ireland and the Early Medieval West. Dublin: Four Courts, 2013. Pp. 400; Color Figures. €55. ISBN: 978-1-84682-387-9. [REVIEW] Speculum 90 (1):281-283.
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  13. Elizabeth Cashdan & Matthew Steele (2013). Pathogen Prevalence, Group Bias, and Collectivism in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. Human Nature 24 (1):59-75.
    It has been argued that people in areas with high pathogen loads will be more likely to avoid outsiders, to be biased in favor of in-groups, and to hold collectivist and conformist values. Cross-national studies have supported these predictions. In this paper we provide new pathogen codes for the 186 cultures of the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample and use them, together with existing pathogen and ethnographic data, to try to replicate these cross-national findings. In support of the theory, (...)
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  14.  11
    F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins-D'alessandro & Lawrence Kohlberg (1989). Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  15.  46
    Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger, Natalie Smith Henrich, Kim Hill, Francisco Gil-White, Michael Gurven, Frank W. Marlowe & John Q. Patton (2005). “Economic Man” in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):795-815.
    Researchers from across the social sciences have found consistent deviations from the predictions of the canonical model of self-interest in hundreds of experiments from around the world. This research, however, cannot determine whether the uniformity results from universal patterns of human behavior or from the limited cultural variation available among the university students used in virtually all prior experimental work. To address this, we undertook a cross-cultural study of behavior in ultimatum, public goods, and dictator games in a range (...)
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  16.  18
    Kenny Smith, Andrew D. M. Smith & Richard A. Blythe (2011). Cross-Situational Learning: An Experimental Study of Word-Learning Mechanisms. Cognitive Science 35 (3):480-498.
    Cross-situational learning is a mechanism for learning the meaning of words across multiple exposures, despite exposure-by-exposure uncertainty as to the word's true meaning. We present experimental evidence showing that humans learn words effectively using cross-situational learning, even at high levels of referential uncertainty. Both overall success rates and the time taken to learn words are affected by the degree of referential uncertainty, with greater referential uncertainty leading to less reliable, slower learning. Words are also (...)
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  17.  15
    Melanie Rein & Leda Stott (2009). Working Together: Critical Perspectives on Six Cross-Sector Partnerships in Southern Africa. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):79 - 89.
    This paper examines six cross-sector partnerships in South Africa and Zambia. These partnerships were part of a research study undertaken between 2003 and 2005 and were selected because of their potential to contribute to poverty reduction in their respective countries. This paper examines the context in which the partnerships were established, their governance and accountability mechanisms and the engagement and participation of the partners and the intended beneficiaries in the partnerships. We argue that a partnership approach which has proven (...)
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  18.  1
    Linda Thorne & Susan Bartholomew Saunders (2002). The Socio-Cultural Embeddedness of Individuals' Ethical Reasoning in Organizations (Cross-Cultural Ethics). Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):1 - 14.
    While models of business ethics increasingly recognize that ethical behavior varies cross-culturally, scant attention has been given to understanding how culture affects the ethical reasoning process that predicates individuals' ethical actions. To address this gap, this paper illustrates how culture may affect the various components of individuals' ethical reasoning by integrating findings from the cross-cultural management literature with cognitive-developmental perspective. Implications for future research and transnational organizations are discussed.
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  19.  1
    John W. Selsky & Barbara Parker (2010). Platforms for Cross-Sector Social Partnerships: Prospective Sensemaking Devices for Social Benefit. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):21 - 37.
    Cross-sector social partnerships (CSSPs) can produce benefits at individual, organizational, sectoral and societal levels. In this article, we argue that the distribution of benefits depends in part on the cognitive frames held by partnership participants. Based on Selsky and Parker's (J Manage 31(6):849-873, 2005) review of CSSPs, we identify three analytic "platforms" for social partnerships — the resource-dependence platform, the social-issue platform, and the societal-sector platform. We situate platforms as prospective sensemaking devices that help project managers make sense of (...)
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  20. Fiona Macpherson (2011). Cross-Modal Experiences. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):429-468.
    This paper provides a categorization of cross-modal experiences. There are myriad forms. Doing so allows us to think clearly about the nature of different cross-modal experiences and allows us to clearly formulate competing hypotheses about the kind of experiences involved in different cross-modal phenomena.
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  21.  5
    Clodia Vurro, M. Tina Dacin & Francesco Perrini (2010). Institutional Antecedents of Partnering for Social Change: How Institutional Logics Shape Cross—Sector Social Partnerships. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):39-53.
    Heeding the call for a deeper understanding of how cross-sector social partnerships can be managed across different contexts, this article integrates ideas from institutional theory with current debate on cross-boundary collaboration. Adopting the point of view of business actors interested in forming a CSSP to address complex social problems, we suggest that "appropriateness" needs shape business approaches toward partnering for social change, exerting an impact on the benefits that can be gained from it. A theoretical framework is proposed (...)
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  22.  10
    Michael O'Rourke & Stephen J. Crowley (2013). Philosophical Intervention and Cross-Disciplinary Science: The Story of the Toolbox Project. Synthese 190 (11):1937-1954.
    In this article we argue that philosophy can facilitate improvement in cross-disciplinary science. In particular, we discuss in detail the Toolbox Project, an effort in applied epistemology that deploys philosophical analysis for the purpose of enhancing collaborative, cross-disciplinary scientific research through improvements in cross-disciplinary communication. We begin by sketching the scientific context within which the Toolbox Project operates, a context that features a growing interest in and commitment to cross-disciplinary research (CDR). We then develop an argument (...)
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  23.  26
    James Weber (2010). Assessing the “Tone at the Top”: The Moral Reasoning of Ceos in the Automobile Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):167 - 182.
    Relying on an expanded view of leadership and the moral reasoning framework developed by Lawrence Kohlberg (1981), this study explores the moral reasoning of the chief executive officers at the 11 largest automobile manufacturers in the world. Using the CEO's letter to their stakeholders found in the organizations' annual social responsibility reports, the CEOs' moral reasoning is compared to other managers' moral reasoning, and the moral reasoning exhibited within the CEO group is analyzed for (...)
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  24.  7
    Alexander W. Kocurek (forthcoming). The Problem of Cross-World Predication. Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-46.
    While standard first-order modal logic is quite powerful, it cannot express even very simple sentences like “I could have been taller than I actually am” or “Everyone could have been smarter than they actually are”. These are examples of cross-world predication, whereby objects in one world are related to objects in another world. Extending first-order modal logic to allow for cross-world predication in a motivated way has proven to be notoriously difficult. In this paper, I argue that the (...)
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  25.  5
    Haley A. Vlach & Catherine M. Sandhofer (2014). Retrieval Dynamics and Retention in Cross‐Situational Statistical Word Learning. Cognitive Science 38 (4):757-774.
    Previous research on cross-situational word learning has demonstrated that learners are able to reduce ambiguity in mapping words to referents by tracking co-occurrence probabilities across learning events. In the current experiments, we examined whether learners are able to retain mappings over time. The results revealed that learners are able to retain mappings for up to 1 week later. However, there were interactions between the amount of retention and the different learning conditions. Interestingly, the strongest retention was associated with (...)
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  26.  15
    K. Praveen Parboteeah, Helena M. Addae & John B. Cullen (2012). Propensity to Support Sustainability Initiatives: A Cross-National Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):403-413.
    Businesses and the social sciences are increasingly facing calls to further scholarship dedicated to understand sustainability. Furthermore, multinationals are also facing similar calls given their high profile and their role in environmental degradation. However, a literature review shows that there is very limited understanding of sustainability at a cross-national level. Given the above gaps, we contribute to the literature by examining how selected GLOBE [House et al., Culture, leadership and organizations: The GOBE study of 62 societies. Sage Publications, Thousand (...)
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  27. Casey O'Callaghan (2008). Seeing What You Hear: Cross-Modal Illusions and Perception. Philosophical Issues 18 (1):316-338.
    Cross-modal perceptual illusions occur when a stimulus to one modality impacts perceptual experience associated with another modality. Unlike synaesthesia, cross-modal illusions are intelligible as results of perceptual strategies for dealing with sensory stimulation to multiple modalities, rather than as mere quirks. I argue that understanding cross-modal illusions reveals an important flaw in a widespread conception of the senses, and of their role in perceptual experience, according to which understanding perception and perceptual experience is a matter of assembling (...)
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  28.  8
    Marlene J. Le Ber & Oana Branzei (2010). Value Frame Fusion in Cross Sector Interactions. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):163-195.
    Prior research flags the inherent incompatibilities between for-profit and nonprofit partners and cautions that clashing value creation logics and conflicting identities can stall social innovation in cross sector partnerships. Process narratives of successful versus unsuccessful cross sector partnerships paint a more optimistic picture, whereby the frequency, intensity, breadth, and depth of interactions may afford frame alignment despite partners’ divergent value creation approaches. However, little is known about how cross sector partners come to recognize and reconcile their divergent (...)
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  29.  4
    Zhenzhong Ma (2010). The SINS in Business Negotiations: Explore the Cross-Cultural Differences in Business Ethics Between Canada and China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (1):123 - 135.
    Ethical dilemmas are inescapable components of business negotiations. It is thus important for negotiators to understand the differences in what is ethically appropriate and what is not. This study explores the cross-cultural differences in business ethics between Canada and China by examining the perceived appropriateness of five categories of ethically questionable strategies often used in business negotiations. The results show that the Chinese are more likely to consider it appropriate to use ethically inappropriate negotiation strategies, but the impact (...)
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  30.  6
    Maria May Seitanidi, Dimitrios N. Koufopoulos & Paul Palmer (2010). Partnership Formation for Change: Indicators for Transformative Potential in Cross Sector Social Partnerships. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):139 - 161.
    We provide a grounded model for analysing formation in cross sector social partnerships to understand why business and nonprofit organizations increasingly partner to address social issues. Our model introduces organizational characteristics, organizational motives and history of partner interactions as critical factors that indicate the potential for social change. We argue that organizational characteristics, motives and the history of interactions indicate transformative capacity, transformative intention and transformative experience, respectively. Together, these three factors consist of a framework that aids early (...)
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  31. Ans Kolk, Willemijn van Dolen & Marlene Vock (2010). Trickle Effects of Cross-Sector Social Partnerships. Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):123-137.
    Cross-sector social partnerships are often studied from a macro and meso perspective, also in an attempt to assess effectiveness and societal impact. This article pays specific attention to the micro perspective, i.e. individual interactions between and within organizations related to partnerships that address the ‘social good’. By focusing on the potential effects and mechanisms at the level of individuals and the organization(s) with which they interact, it aims to help fill a gap in research on partnerships, including more insight (...)
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  32.  17
    John Cherry, Monle Lee & Charles S. Chien (2003). A Cross-Cultural Application of a Theoretical Model of Business Ethics: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Data. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):359 - 376.
    Hunt and Vitell''s General Theory (1992) is used in a cross-cultural comparison of U.S. and Taiwanese business practitioners. Results indicate that Taiwanese practitioners exhibit lower perceptions of an ethical issue in a scenario based on bribery, as well as milder deontological evaluations and ethical judgments relative to their U.S. counterparts. In addition, Taiwan respondents showed higher likelihood of making the payment. Several of the paths between variables in the theory are confirmed in both U.S. and Taiwan samples, with (...)
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  33. Jason Oakes (2015). Alliances in Human Biology: The Harvard Committee on Industrial Physiology, 1929–1939. Journal of the History of Biology 48 (3):365-390.
    In 1929 the newly-reorganized Rockefeller Foundation funded the work of a cross-disciplinary group at Harvard University called the Committee on Industrial Physiology. The committee’s research and pedagogical work was oriented towards different things for different members of the alliance. The CIP program included a research component in the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Elton May’s interpretation of the Hawthorne Studies; a pedagogical aspect as part of Wallace Donham’s curriculum for Harvard Business School; and Lawrence Henderson’s work with the Harvard (...)
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  34.  25
    Gael McDonald (2000). Cross-Cultural Methodological Issues in Ethical Research. Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):89 - 104.
    Despite the fundamental and administrative difficulties associated with cross-cultural research the rewards are significant and, given an increasing trend toward globalisation, the move away from singular location studies to more comparative research is to be encouraged. In order to facilitate this research process it is imperative, however, that considerable attention is given to the methodological issues that can beset cross-cultural research, specifically as these issues relate to the primary domain or discipline of investigation, which in this (...)
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  35.  4
    Stefan L. Frank, Thijs Trompenaars & Shravan Vasishth (2015). Cross‐Linguistic Differences in Processing Double‐Embedded Relative Clauses: Working‐Memory Constraints or Language Statistics? Cognitive Science 39 (7).
    An English double-embedded relative clause from which the middle verb is omitted can often be processed more easily than its grammatical counterpart, a phenomenon known as the grammaticality illusion. This effect has been found to be reversed in German, suggesting that the illusion is language specific rather than a consequence of universal working memory constraints. We present results from three self-paced reading experiments which show that Dutch native speakers also do not show the grammaticality illusion in Dutch, whereas both German (...)
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  36.  3
    Jon Reast, Adam Lindgreen, Joëlle Vanhamme & François Maon (2010). The Manchester Super Casino: Experience and Learning in a Cross-Sector Social Partnership. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):197 - 218.
    The management of cross-sector social partnerships (CSSPs) among government, business, and not-for-profit entities can be complex and difficult. This article considers the importance of organizational experience and learning for the successful development of CSSPs. By analyzing the Manchester Super Casino, this research emphasizes the significant benefits of prior experience with CSSPs that enable partners to learn and develop relationships, skills, and capabilities over time, which then have positive influences on future performance. The result is a refined learning model of (...)
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  37.  24
    John Cherry (2006). The Impact of Normative Influence and Locus of Control on Ethical Judgments and Intentions: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):113 - 132.
    The study extends the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in a cross-cultural setting, incorporating ethical judgments and locus of control in a comparison of Taiwanese and US businesspersons. A self-administered survey of 698 businesspersons from the US and Taiwan examined several hypothesized differences. Results indicate that while Taiwanese respondents have a more favorable attitude toward a requested bribe than US counterparts, and are less likely to view it as an ethical issue, their higher locus externality causes ethical judgments and (...)
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  38.  20
    Roger J. Volkema & Maria Tereza Leme Fleury (2002). Alternative Negotiating Conditions and the Choice of Negotiation Tactics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (4):381 - 398.
    The growth in international trade in recent years necessitates a better understanding of customs and expectations in cross-cultural negotiations. While several researchers have sought to examine and detail the similarities and differences between select countries, their data have generally been obtained under neutral or unspecified negotiating conditions. However, issue importance, opponent (prowess, ethical reputation), and context (location, confederate awareness, urgency) can play a significant role in the use of negotiating tactics. This paper describes a study comparing the perceptions (...)
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  39.  6
    Haiying Lin (2012). Cross-Sector Alliances for Corporate Social Responsibility Partner Heterogeneity Moderates Environmental Strategy Outcomes. Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):219-229.
    This article provides a new mechanism in understanding how partner heterogeneity moderates an alliance's ability to advance corporate social responsibility goals. I identified the antecedents for firms to select a more diverse set of partners and explored whether more diverse alliances (especially cross-sector alliances) may facilitate partners to achieve more proactive environmental outcomes. I employ 146 environmental alliances formed in the U.S. between 1990 and 2009 to test the assertions. Results suggest that firms with innovative orientation and alliance (...)
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  40.  13
    Kai Wehmeier (2012). Subjunctivity and Cross-World Predication. Philosophical Studies 159 (1):107-122.
    The main goal of this paper is to present and compare two approaches to formalizing cross-world comparisons like John might have been taller than he is in quantified modal logics. One is the standard method employing degrees and graded positives, according to which the example just given is to be paraphrased as something like The height that John has is such that he might have had a height greater than it, which is amenable to familiar formalization strategies with respect (...)
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  41.  24
    Ali Ansari (2001). The Greening of Engineers: A Cross-Cultural Experience. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):105-115.
    Experience with a group of mechanical engineering seniors at the University of Colorado led to an informal experiment with engineering students in India. An attempt was made to qualitatively gauge the students’ ability to appreciate a worldview different from the standard engineering worldview—that of a mechanical universe. Qualitative differences between organic and mechanical systems were used as a point of discussion. Both groups were found to exhibit distinct thought and behavior patterns which provide important clues for sensitizing engineers to environmental (...)
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  42.  37
    Steve Fuller (2014). The Higher Whitewash. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (1):86-101.
    An assessment of Joel Isaac’s recent, well-researched attempt to provide a context for the emergence of Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. That context consisted in the open space for cross-disciplinary projects between the natural and social sciences that existed at Harvard during the presidency of James Bryant Conant, from the early 1930s to the early 1950s. Isaac’s work at the Harvard archives adds interesting detail to a story whose general contours are already known. In particular, he reinforces the (...)
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  43.  5
    Michael J. Gift, Paul Gift & QinQin Zheng (2013). Cross-Cultural Perceptions of Business Ethics: Evidence From the United States and China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (4):633-642.
    A number of empirical studies have examined business ethics across cultures, focusing primarily on differences in ethical profiles between cultures and groups. When managers consider whether or not to develop a business relationship with those from a different culture, their decision may be affected by actual differences in ethical profiles, but potentially even more so by their perceptions of ethicality in the counterpart culture. The latter issue has been largely ignored in extant empirical research regarding cross-cultural ethical profiles. (...)
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  44. Roberto Festa (2007). Verisimilitude, Cross Classification and Prediction Logic. Approaching the Statistical Truth by Falsified Qualitative Theories. Mind and Society 6 (1):91-114.
    In this paper it is argued that qualitative theories (Q-theories) can be used to describe the statistical structure of cross classified populations and that the notion of verisimilitude provides an appropriate tool for measuring the statistical adequacy of Q-theories. First of all, a short outline of the post-Popperian approaches to verisimilitude and of the related verisimilitudinarian non-falsificationist methodologies (VNF-methodologies) is given. Secondly, the notion of Q-theory is explicated, and the qualitative verisimilitude of Q-theories is defined. Afterwards, appropriate measures for (...)
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  45.  3
    Matthew Murphy & Daniel Arenas (2010). Through Indigenous Lenses: Cross—Sector Collaborations with Fringe Stakeholders. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):103 - 121.
    This article argues that considering cross-sector collaborations through the lens of indigenous-corporate engagements yields a more comprehensive understanding of the range of cross-sector engagement types, emphasizes the importance of cross-cultural bridge building which has received little attention in the literature (Selsky and Parker, J Manag 31(6):849-873, 2005), and highlights the potential for innovation via collaborations with fringe stakeholders. The study offers a more overarching typology of cross-sector collaborations and, building on an ethical approach to sustainable development (...)
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  46. Anna Szabolcsi (2003). Binding On the Fly: Cross-Sentential Anaphora in Variable— Free Semantics. In R. Oehrle & J. Kruijff (eds.), Resource Sensitivity, Binding, and Anaphora. Kluwer 215--227.
    Combinatory logic (Curry and Feys 1958) is a “variable-free” alternative to the lambda calculus. The two have the same expressive power but build their expressions differently. “Variable-free” semantics is, more precisely, “free of variable binding”: it has no operation like abstraction that turns a free variable into a bound one; it uses combinators—operations on functions—instead. For the general linguistic motivation of this approach, see the works of Steedman, Szabolcsi, and Jacobson, among others. The standard view in linguistics is that (...)
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  47.  2
    Christopher Chung (2015). Comparison of Cross Culture Engineering Ethics Training Using the Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (2):471-478.
    This paper describes the use and analysis of the Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education to perform cross culture engineering ethics training and analysis. Details describing the first generation and second generation development of the SEEE are published in Chung and Alfred, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 15, 2009 and Alfred and Chung, Science and Engineering Ethics, vol. 18, 2012. In this effort, a group of far eastern educated students operated the simulator (...)
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  48.  48
    J. Brooke Hamilton, Stephen B. Knouse & Vanessa Hill (2009). Google in China: A Manager-Friendly Heuristic Model for Resolving Cross-Cultural Ethical Conflicts. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):143 - 157.
    Management practitioners and scholars have worked diligently to identify methods for ethical decision making in international contexts. Theoretical frameworks such as Integrative Social Contracts Theory (Donaldson and Dunfee, 1994, Academy of Management Review 19, 252–284) and more recently the Global Business Citizenship Approach [Wood et al., 2006, Global Business Citizenship: A Transformative Framework for Ethics and Sustainable Capitalism. (M. E. Sharpe, Armonk, NY)] have produced innovations in practice. Despite these advances, many managers have difficulty implementing these theoretical concepts in daily (...)
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    Subrata Chattopadhyay & Alfred Simon (2008). East Meets West: Cross-Cultural Perspective in End-of-Life Decision Making From Indian and German Viewpoints. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):165-174.
    Culture creates the context within which individuals experience life and comprehend moral meaning of illness, suffering and death. The ways the patient, family and the physician communicate and make decisions in the end-of-life care are profoundly influenced by culture. What is considered as right or wrong in the healthcare setting may depend on the socio-cultural context. The present article is intended to delve into the cross-cultural perspectives in ethical decision making in the end-of-life scenario. We attempt to address (...)
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    John Tsalikis, Bruce Seaton & Petros Tomaras (2002). A New Perspective on Cross-Cultural Ethical Evaluations: The Use of Conjoint Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 35 (4):281 - 292.
    The present paper compares the ethical perceptions of Americans and Greeks using conjoint analysis. The two samples were presented with 2 scenarios manipulating three factors: gender of the transgressor, organizational status of the transgressor, and the magnitude of the transgression. For each scenario, conventional mean comparisons and conjoint analyses were performed on five ethical measurements. The matrix of means and the relative importances of the American sample were compared with that of the Greek sample. The results showed that Greeks (...)
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