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  1. Lawrence E. Johnson (2010). A Life-Centered Approach to Bioethics: Biocentric Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Backgrounds: 2. Some background: self and reason; 3. Some background: approaches to ethics; 4. Some background: our good; 5. Elusive lines, slippery slopes, and moral principles; Part II. Life, Death, and Bioethics: 6. Being alive; 7. Being healthy; 8. Health and virtue; 9. Death and life; 10. Drawing lines with death; 11. Double effect: euthanasia, and proportionality; 12. Abortion; 13. The gene I: the mystique; 14. The gene II: manipulation; 15. Ethics and biomedical (...)
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  2. Lawrence E. Johnson (2003). Future Generations and Contemporary Ethics. Environmental Values 12 (4):471 - 487.
    Future generations do not exist, and are not determinate in their make-up. The moral significance of future generations cannot be accounted for on the basis of a purely individualistic ethic. Yet future generations are morally significant. The Person-Affecting Principle, that (roughly) only acts which are likely to affect particular individuals are morally significant, must be augmented in such a way as to take into account the moral significance of Homo sapiens, a holistic entity which certainly does exist. Recent contributions to (...)
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  3. Lawrence E. Johnson (1992). Focusing on Truth. Routledge.
    Focusing on Truth explores the question of what truth is, balancing historical with issue-orientated discussion. The book offers a comprehensive survey of all the major theories of truth. Lawrence Johnson investigates a number of closely related matters of truth in his inquiry, such as: What sorts of things are true or false? What is attributed to them when they are said to be true or false? What do facts have to do with truth? What can we learn from previous theories? (...)
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  4. Lawrence E. Johnson (1992). Toward the Moral Considerability of Species and Ecosystems. Environmental Ethics 14 (2):145-157.
    I develop the thesis that species and ecosystems are living entities with morally significant interests in their own right and defend it against leading objections. Contrary to certain claims, it is possible to individuate such entities sufficiently well. Indeed, there is a sense in which such entities define their own nature. I also consider and reject the argument that species and ecosystems cannot have interests or even traits in their own right because evolution does not proceed on that level. Although (...)
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  5. T. L. S. Sprigge & Lawrence E. Johnson (1992). A Morally Deep World: An Essay on Moral Significance and Environmental Ethics. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):378.
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  6. Lawrence E. Johnson (1983). Do Animals Have an Interest in Life? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61 (2):172 – 184.
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  7. Lawrence E. Johnson (1983). Humanity, Holism, and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 5 (4):345-354.
    The human race is an ongoing entity, not just a collection of individuals. It has interests which are not just the aggregated interests of individual humans. These interests are morally significant and have important implications for environmental ethics.
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  8. Lawrence E. Johnson (1977). A Matter of Fact. Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):508 - 518.
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