Search results for 'Lawrence Goldstein' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. S. J. Goldstein (1999). Health Communication: Lessons From Family Planning and Reproductive Health. By Phyllis Tilson Piotrow, D. Lawrence Kincaid, Jose G. Rimon II & Ward Rinehart. Pp. 307. (Praeger Publishers, CT, USA, 1997.) ISBN 0-275-95578-8. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (3):425-432.score: 360.0
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  2. Lawrence Goldstein (2010). Why Scientific Details Are Important When Novel Technologies Encounter Law, Politics, and Ethics. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):204-211.score: 240.0
    This paper focuses on the issue of what to do if a couple who generates embryos chooses to lawfully, and in their (and my) view, ethnically discard those embryos. Specifically, is it appropriate to use the cells that come from “excess” embryos in medical research instead of discarding them when a couple has ceased trying to have any additional children?
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  3. Lawrence Goldstein (1989). Wittgenstein and Paraconsistency. In G. Priest, R. Routley & J. Norman (eds.), Paraconsistent Logic: Essays on the Inconsistent. Philosophia Verlag. 540--62.score: 240.0
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  4. Julius Goldstein (2008). Julius Goldstein: Der Jüdische Philosoph in Seinen Tagebüchern: 1873-1929, Hamburg, Jena, Darmstadt. Kommission für Die Geschichte der Juden in Hessen.score: 180.0
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  5. Mark Lawrence (forthcoming). Mark Lawrence 97. Journal of Thought.score: 180.0
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  6. Michael A. Pirson & Paul R. Lawrence (2010). Humanism in Business – Towards a Paradigm Shift? Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):553 - 565.score: 60.0
    Management theory and practice are facing unprecedented challenges. The lack of sustainability, the increasing inequity, and the continuous decline in societal trust pose a threat to ‘business as usual’ (Jackson and Nelson, 2004 ). Capitalism is at a crossroad and scholars, practitioners, and policy makers are called to rethink business strategy in light of major external changes (Arena, 2004 ; Hart, 2005 ). In the following, we review an alternative view of human beings that is based on a renewed (...)
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  7. Paul R. Lawrence (2004). The Biological Base of Morality? The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:59-79.score: 60.0
    The study of human morality has historically been carried out primarily by philosophers and theologians. Now this broad topic is also being studied systematically by evolutionary biologists and various behavioral and social sciences. Based upon a review of this work, this paper will propose a unified explanation of human morality as an innate feature of human minds. The theory argues that morality is an innate skill that developed as a means to fulfill the human drive to bond with others in (...)
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  8. Laurence Goldstein (1999). Clear and Queer Thinking: Wittgenstein's Development and His Relevance to Modern Thought. Duckworth.score: 60.0
    Laurence Goldstein gives a straightforward and lively account of some of the central themes of Wittgenstein's writings on meaning, mind, and mathematics.
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  9. Stuart Lawrence (2013). Moral Awareness in Greek Tragedy. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    Lawrence's volume provides a detailed discussion and analyses of the moral awareness of major characters in Greek tragedy, focusing particularly on the characters' recognition of moral issues and crises, their ability to reflect on them, and their consciousness of doing so.
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  10. Jürgen Goldstein (2007). Kontingenz Und Rationalität Bei Descartes: Eine Studie Zur Genese des Cartesianismus. Meiner.score: 60.0
    Jürgen Goldstein gibt Antwort auf diese Fragen, indem er zunächst den von Descartes vorausgesetzten Kontingenzbegriff in seiner Genese rekonstruiert – eine Begriffsgeschichte des Terminus "contingentia" stellt noch immer ein Desiderat ...
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  11. Catherine Goldstein (2000). Documents-Essay Review: On Catherine Goldsteins Book, Un Theoreme de Fermat Et Ses Lecteurs. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (2):295.score: 60.0
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  12. Irwin Goldstein (1989). Pleasure and Pain: Unconditional Intrinsic Values. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (December):255-276.score: 30.0
    That all pleasure is good and all pain bad in itself is an eternally true ethical principle. The common claim that some pleasure is not good, or some pain not bad, is mistaken. Strict particularism (ethical decisions must be made case by case; there are no sound universal normative principles) and relativism (all good and bad are relative to society) are among the ethical theories we may refute through an appeal to pleasure and pain. Daniel Dennett, Philippa Foot, R M (...)
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  13. Irwin Goldstein (1980). Why People Prefer Pleasure to Pain. Philosophy 55 (July):349-362.score: 30.0
    Against Hume and Epicurus I argue that our selection of pleasure, pain and other objects as our ultimate ends is guided by reason. There are two parts to the explanation of our attraction to pleasure, our aversion to pain, and our consequent preference of pleasure to pain: 1. Pleasure presents us with reason to seek it, pain presents us reason to avoid it, and 2. Being intelligent, human beings (and to a degree, many animals) are disposed to be guided by (...)
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  14. Irwin Goldstein (1994). Identifying Mental States: A Celebrated Hypothesis Refuted. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):46-62.score: 30.0
    Functionalists think an event's causes and effects, its 'causal role', determines whether it is a mental state and, if so, which kind. Functionalists see this causal role principle as supporting their orthodox materialism, their commitment to the neuroscientist's ontology. I examine and refute the functionalist's causal principle and the orthodox materialism that attends that principle.
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  15. Irwin Goldstein (2003). Malicious Pleasure Evaluated: Is Pleasure an Unconditional Good? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):24–31.score: 30.0
    Pleasure is one of the strongest candidates for an occurrence that might be good, in some respect, unconditionally. Malicious pleasure is one of the most often cited alleged counter-examples to pleasure’s being an unconditional good. Correctly evaluating malicious pleasure is more complex than people realize. I defend pleasure’s unconditionally good status from critics of malicious pleasure.
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  16. Irwin Goldstein (2002). Are Emotions Feelings? A Further Look at Hedonic Theories of Emotions. Consciousness and Emotion 3 (1):21-33.score: 30.0
    Many philosophers sharply distinguish emotions from feelings. Emotions are not feelings, and having an emotion does not necessitate having some feeling, they think. In this paper I reply to a set of arguments people use sharply to distinguish emotions from feelings. In response to these people, I endorse and defend a hedonic theory of emotion that avoids various anti-feeling objections. Proponents of this hedonic theory analyze an emotion by reference to forms of cognition (e.g., thought, belief, judgment) and a pleasant (...)
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  17. Irwin Goldstein (1983). Pain and Masochism. Journal of Value Inquiry 17 (3):219-223.score: 30.0
    That pain and suffering are unwanted is no truism. Like the sadist, the masochist wants pain. Like sadism, masochism entails an irrational, abnormal attitude toward pain. I explain this abnormality.
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  18. Irwin Goldstein (2004). Neural Materialism, Pain's Badness, and a Posteriori Identities. In Maite Ezcurdia, Robert Stainton & Christopher Viger (eds.), New Essays in the Philosophy of Language and Mind. University of Calgary Press. 261-273.score: 30.0
    Orthodox neural materialists think mental states are neural events or orthodox material properties of neutral events. Orthodox material properties are defining properties of the “physical”. A “defining property” of the physical is a type of property that provides a necessary condition for something’s being correctly termed “physical”. In this paper I give an argument against orthodox neural materialism. If successful, the argument would show at least some properties of some mental states are not orthodox material properties of neural events. Opposing (...)
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  19. Laurence Goldstein (2004). The Barber, Russell's Paradox, Catch-22, God, Contradiction and More: A Defence of a Wittgensteinian Conception of Contradiction. In Graham Priest, Jc Beall & Bradley Armour-Garb (eds.), The law of non-contradiction: new philosophical essays. Oxford University Press. 295--313.score: 30.0
    outrageous remarks about contradictions. Perhaps the most striking remark he makes is that they are not false. This claim first appears in his early notebooks (Wittgenstein 1960, p.108). In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein argued that contradictions (like tautologies) are not statements (Sätze) and hence are not false (or true). This is a consequence of his theory that genuine statements are pictures.
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  20. Irwin Goldstein (2001). Book Review, Peter Unger, Living High and Letting Die. [REVIEW] Philosophia 28 (1-4).score: 30.0
  21. Irwin Goldstein (1996). Ontology, Epistemology, and Private Ostensive Definition. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):137-147.score: 30.0
    People see five kinds of views in epistemology and ontology as hinging on there being words a person can learn only by private ostensive definitions, through direct acquaintance with his own sensations: skepticism about other minds, 2. skepticism about an external world, 3. foundationalism, 4. dualism, and 5. phenomenalism. People think Wittgenstein refuted these views by showing, they believe, no word is learnable only by private ostensive definition. I defend these five views from Wittgenstein’s attack.
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  22. Irwin Goldstein (2000). Intersubjective Properties by Which We Specify Pain, Pleasure, and Other Kinds of Mental States. Philosophy 75 (291):89-104.score: 30.0
    By what types of properties do we specify twinges, toothaches, and other kinds of mental states? Wittgenstein considers two methods. Procedure one, direct, private acquaintance: A person connects a word to the sensation it specifies through noticing what that sensation is like in his own experience. Procedure two, outward signs: A person pins his use of a word to outward, pre-verbal signs of the sensation. I identify and explain a third procedure and show we in fact specify many kinds of (...)
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  23. Martin Daumer, Detlef Duerr, Sheldon Goldstein, Tim Maudlin, Roderich Tumulka & Nino Zanghi, The Message of the Quantum?score: 30.0
    We criticize speculations to the effect that quantum mechanics is fundamentally about information. We do this by pointing out how unfounded such speculations in fact are. Our analysis focuses on the dubious claims of this kind recently made by Anton Zeilinger.
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  24. Sheldon Goldstein, Boltzmann Entropy for Dense Fluids Not in Local Equilibrium.score: 30.0
    Using computer simulations, we investigate the time evolution of the (Boltzmann) entropy of a dense fluid not in local equilibrium. The macrovariables M describing the system are the (empirical) particle density f = {f(x,v)} and the total energy E. We find that S(ft,E) is a monotone increasing in time even when its kinetic part is decreasing. We argue that for isolated Hamiltonian systems monotonicity of S(Mt) = S(MXt) should hold generally for ‘‘typical’’ (the overwhelming majority of) initial microstates (phase points) (...)
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  25. Irwin Goldstein (1985). Communication and Mental Events. American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (October):331-338.score: 30.0
    How do the young learn names for feelings? After criticizing Wittgensteinian explanations, I formulate and defend an explanation very different from Wittgensteinians embrace.
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  26. Gavin Lawrence (1993). Aristotle and the Ideal Life. Philosophical Review 102 (1):1-34.score: 30.0
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  27. Sheldon Goldstein (2010). Bohmian Mechanics and Quantum Information. Foundations of Physics 40 (4):335-355.score: 30.0
    Many recent results suggest that quantum theory is about information, and that quantum theory is best understood as arising from principles concerning information and information processing. At the same time, by far the simplest version of quantum mechanics, Bohmian mechanics, is concerned, not with information but with the behavior of an objective microscopic reality given by particles and their positions. What I would like to do here is to examine whether, and to what extent, the importance of information, observation, and (...)
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  28. Irwin Goldstein (1981). Cognitive Pleasure and Distress. Philosophical Studies 39 (January):15-23.score: 30.0
    Explaining the "intentional object" some people assign pleasure, I argue that a person is pleased about something when his thoughts about that thing cause him to feel pleasure. Bernard Williams, Gilbert Ryle, and Irving Thalberg, who reject this analysis, are discussed. Being pleased (or distressed) about something is a compound of pleasure (pain) and some thought or belief. Pleasure in itself does not have an "intentional object".
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  29. Sheldon Goldstein, Opposite Arrows of Time Can Reconcile Relativity and Nonlocality.score: 30.0
    We present a quantum model for the motion of N point particles, implying nonlocal (i.e., superluminal) influences of external fields on the trajectories, that is nonetheless fully relativistic. In contrast to other models that have been proposed, this one involves no additional space-time structure as would be provided by a (possibly dynamical) foliation of space-time. This is achieved through the interplay of opposite microcausal and macrocausal (i.e., thermodynamic) arrows of time. PACS numbers 03.65.Ud; 03.65.Ta; 03.30.+p..
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  30. Valia Allori, Sheldon Goldstein, Roderich Tumulka & Nino Zanghi (2008). On the Common Structure of Bohmian Mechanics and the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber Theory. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):353 - 389.score: 30.0
    Bohmian mechanics and the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber theory provide opposite resolutions of the quantum measurement problem: the former postulates additional variables (the particle positions) besides the wave function, whereas the latter implements spontaneous collapses of the wave function by a nonlinear and stochastic modification of Schrödinger's equation. Still, both theories, when understood appropriately, share the following structure: They are ultimately not about wave functions but about 'matter' moving in space, represented by either particle trajectories, fields on space-time, or a discrete set of (...)
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  31. Sheldon Goldstein, Bohmian Mechanics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Bohmian mechanics, which is also called the de Broglie-Bohm theory, the pilot-wave model, and the causal interpretation of quantum mechanics, is a version of quantum theory discovered by Louis de Broglie in 1927 and rediscovered by David Bohm in 1952. It is the simplest example of what is often called a hidden variables interpretation of quantum mechanics. In Bohmian mechanics a system of particles is described in part by its wave function, evolving, as usual, according to Schrödinger's equation. However, the (...)
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  32. Irwin Goldstein (2007). Solipsism and the Solitary Language User. Philosophical Papers 36 (1):35-47.score: 30.0
    A person skeptical about other minds supposes it is possible in principle that there are no minds other than his. A person skeptical about an external world thinks it is possible there is no world external to him. Some philosophers think a person can refute the skeptic and prove that his world is not the solitary scenario the skeptic supposes might be realized. In this paper I examine one argument that some people think refutes solipsism. The argument, from Wittgenstein, is (...)
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  33. Bonita Lawrence (2003). Gender, Race, and the Regulation of Native Identity in Canada and the United States: An Overview. Hypatia 18 (2):3-31.score: 30.0
    : The regulation of Native identity has been central to the colonization process in both Canada and the United States. Systems of classification and control enable settler governments to define who is "Indian," and control access to Native land. These regulatory systems have forcibly supplanted traditional Indigenous ways of identifying the self in relation to land and community, functioning discursively to naturalize colonial worldviews. Decolonization, then, must involve deconstructing and reshaping how we understand Indigenous identity.
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  34. Martin Daumer, Detlef Dürr, Sheldon Goldstein & Nino Zanghì (1996). Naive Realism About Operators. Erkenntnis 45 (2-3):379 - 397.score: 30.0
    A source of much difficulty and confusion in the interpretation of quantum mechanics is a naive realism about operators. By this we refer to various ways of taking too seriously the notion of operator-as-observable, and in particular to the all too casual talk about measuring operators that occurs when the subject is quantum mechanics. Without a specification of what should be meant by measuring a quantum observable, such an expression can have no clear meaning. A definite specification is provided by (...)
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  35. Laurence Goldstein (1980). The Reasons of a Materialist. Philosophy 55 (April):249-252.score: 30.0
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  36. Sheldon Goldstein, On the Weak Measurement of Velocity in Bohmian Mechanics.score: 30.0
    In a recent article [1], Wiseman has proposed the use of so-called weak measurements for the determination of the velocity of a quantum particle at a given position, and has shown that according to quantum mechanics the result of such a procedure is the Bohmian velocity of the particle. Although Bohmian mechanics is empirically equivalent to variants based on velocity formulas different from the Bohmian one, and although it has been proven that the velocity in Bohmian mechanics is not measurable, (...)
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  37. Sheldon Goldstein, James Taylor, Roderich Tumulka & Nino Zanghi (2005). Are All Particles Real? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 36 (1):103-112.score: 30.0
    In Bohmian mechanics elementary particles exist objectively, as point particles moving according to a law determined by a wavefunction. In this context, questions as to whether the particles of a certain species are real---questions such as, Do photons exist? Electrons? Or just the quarks?---have a clear meaning. We explain that, whatever the answer, there is a corresponding Bohm-type theory, and no experiment can ever decide between these theories. Another question that has a clear meaning is whether particles are intrinsically distinguishable, (...)
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  38. Sheldon Goldstein (1996). Bohmian Mechanics and the Quantum Revolution. [REVIEW] Synthese 107 (1):145 - 165.score: 30.0
    When I was young I was fascinated by the quantum revolution: the transition from classical definiteness and determinism to quantum indeterminacy and uncertainty, from classical laws that are indifferent, if not hostile, to the human presence, to quantum laws that fundamentally depend upon an observer for their very meaning. I was intrigued by the radical subjectivity, as expressed by Heisenberg’s assertion [3] that “The idea of an objective real world whose smallest parts exist objectively in the same sense as stones (...)
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  39. Irwin Goldstein (2002). The Good's Magnetism and Ethical Realism. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):1-14.score: 30.0
    People support ethical antirealism with various arguments. Gilbert Harman thinks if a property of goodness existed, it would have detectable effects on objects that have it. However, Harman reasons, the good has no such detectable effects. Internalists think if good objects had some goodness property, that property would bond to desire and action in a way inconsistent with ethical realism. I defend ethical realism from the two arguments. I explain how good can both name a property and how objects with (...)
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  40. Irwin Goldstein (1985). Hedonic Pluralism. Philosophical Studies 48 (1):49 - 55.score: 30.0
    Hedonic pluralism is the thesis that 'pleasure' cannot be given a single, all-embracing definition. In this paper I criticize the reasoning people use to support this thesis and suggest some plausible all-encompassing analyses that easily avoid the kinds of objections people raise to all-encompassing analyses.
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  41. Sheldon Goldstein, D. Dürr, J. Taylor, R. Tumulka & and N. Zanghì, Quantum Mechanics in Multiply-Connected Spaces.score: 30.0
    J. Phys. A, to appear, quant-ph/0506173.
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  42. Laurence Goldstein (2005). Introduction. The Monist 88 (1):3-10.score: 30.0
    This paper builds on work done by Graham Priest (1994, 1995, 1998b, 2000) but does not presuppose knowledge of that work. Priest established that many paradoxes, which had been traditionally divided into different families, have a structure in common – which he calls the Inclosure Schema – and, correlatively, that these paradoxes demand a uniform solution. The uniform solution favoured by Priest is a Dialetheist one. I show that, with minor modification, the Inclosure Schema becomes sufficiently embracing to exhibit the (...)
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  43. Marilynn Lawrence, Hellenistic Astrology. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
  44. Pedro L. Garrido, Sheldon Goldstein, Jani Lukkarinen & Roderich Tumulka, Paradoxical Reflection in Quantum Mechanics.score: 30.0
    This article concerns a phenomenon of elementary quantum mechanics that is quite counter-intuitive, very non-classical, and apparently not widely known: a quantum particle can get reflected at a potential step downwards. In contrast, classical particles get reflected only at upward steps. As a consequence, a quantum particle can be trapped for a long time (though not forever) in a region surrounded by downward potential steps, that is, on a plateau. Said succinctly, a quantum particle tends not to fall off a (...)
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  45. Sheldon Goldstein, Quantum Equilibrium and the Role of Operators as Observables in Quantum Theory.score: 30.0
    Bohmian mechanics is arguably the most naively obvious embedding imaginable of Schr¨ odinger’s equation into a completely coherent physical theory. It describes a world in which particles move in a highly non-Newtonian sort of way, one which may at first appear to have little to do with the spectrum of predictions of quantum mechanics. It turns out, however, that as a consequence of the defining dynamical equations of Bohmian mechanics, when a system has wave function ψ its configuration is typically (...)
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  46. Laurence Goldstein (2002). How Original a Work is the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus? Philosophy 77 (3):421-446.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus is widely regarded as a masterpiece, a brilliant, if flawed attempt to achieve an ‘unassailable and definitive … final solution’ to a wide range of philosophical problems. Yet, in a 1931 notebook, Wittgenstein confesses: ‘I think there is some truth in my idea that I am really only reproductive in my thinking. I think I have never invented a line of thinking but that it was always provided for me by someone else’. This disarming self-assessment is, I believe (...)
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  47. Peter Barker & Bernard R. Goldstein (1998). Realism and Instrumentalism in Sixteenth Century Astronomy: A Reappraisal. Perspectives on Science 6 (3):232-258.score: 30.0
    : We question the claim, common since Duhem, that sixteenth century astronomy, and especially the Wittenberg interpretation of Copernicus, was instrumentalistic rather than realistic. We identify a previously unrecognized Wittenberg astronomer, Edo Hildericus (Hilderich von Varel), who presents a detailed exposition of Copernicus's cosmology that is incompatible with instrumentalism. Quotations from other sixteenth century astronomers show that knowledge of the real configuration of the heavens was unattainable practically, rather than in principle. Astronomy was limited to quia demonstrations, although demonstration propter (...)
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  48. Sheldon Goldstein, Are All Particles Identical?score: 30.0
    We consider the possibility that all particles in the world are fundamentally identical, i.e., belong to the same species. Different masses, charges, spins, flavors, or colors then merely correspond to different quantum states of the same particle, just as spin-up and spin-down do. The implications of this viewpoint can be best appreciated within Bohmian mechanics, a precise formulation of quantum mechanics with particle trajectories. The implementation of this viewpoint in such a theory leads to trajectories different from those of the (...)
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  49. Laurence Goldstein (2004). Paradoxes: Their Roots, Range and Resolution. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (4):656 – 658.score: 30.0
    Book Information Paradoxes: Their Roots, Range and Resolution. Paradoxes: Their Roots, Range and Resolution Nicholas Rescher , Chicago and La Salle : Open Court , 2001 , xxiii + 293 , US$24.95 ( paper ). By Nicholas Rescher. Open Court. Chicago and La Salle. Pp. xxiii + 293. US$24.95 (paper:).
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  50. Laurence Goldstein (1999). Wittgenstein's Ph.D Viva—a Re-Creation. Philosophy 74 (4):499-513.score: 30.0
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