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Profile: Larry Nolan (California State University, Long Beach)
  1. Lawrence Nolan (2012). Malebranche on Sensory Cognition and "Seeing As&Quot;. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):21-52.
    Nicolas Malebranche Famously holds that we see all things in the physical world by means of ideas in God. This is the doctrine of Vision in God. In his initial formulation of the doctrine in the first edition of the Search After Truth (1674), Malebranche seems to posit ideas of particular physical objects in God, such as the idea of the sun or the idea of a tree. However, in Elucidations of the Search published four years later he insists that (...)
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  2. Lawrence Nolan (2011). Call Color”. In , Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. 81.
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  3. Lawrence Nolan (2011). Descartes on "What We Call Color". In , Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Lawrence Nolan (ed.) (2011). Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press.
    The essays collected here cover a wide range of topics, including the foundation for the distinction, the question of whether or not it is metaphysical or ...
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  5. Lawrence Nolan (2009). Review of W. J. Mander, The Philosophy of John Norris. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  6. Lawrence Nolan, Malebranche's Theory of Ideas and Vision in God. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  7. Lawrence Nolan & Alan Nelson (2006). Proofs for the Existence of God. In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), The Blackwell to Descartes’ Meditations. Blackwell Publishing. 104--121.
    We argue that Descartes’s theistic proofs in the ’Meditations’ are much simpler and straightforward than they are traditionally taken to be. In particular, we show how the causal argument of the "Third Meditation" depends on the intuitively innocent principle that nothing comes from nothing, and not on the more controversial principle that the objective reality of an idea must have a cause with at least as much formal reality. We also demonstrate that the so-called ontological "argument" of the "Fifth Meditation" (...)
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  8. Lawrence Nolan & Alan Nelson (2006). To a Reader Voyaging Through the Meditations for the First Time, Descartes' Proofs for the Existence of God Can Seem Daunting, Especially the Argument of Meditation III, with its Appeal to Causal Principles That Seem Arcane, and to Medieval Doctrines About Different Modes of Being and Degrees of Reality. First-Time Readers Are Not Alone in Feeling Bewildered. Many Commentators Have Had the Same Reaction. In an Attempt at Charity, Some of Them Have Tried to Tame the Complexity of Descartes' Discussion by .. [REVIEW] In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Blackwell Guide to Descartes’ Meditations. Wiley-Blackwell. 2--104.
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  9. Lawrence Nolan & Alan Nelson (2006). The Blackwell to Descartes’ Meditations. Blackwell Publishing.
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  10. Lawrence Nolan & John Whipple (2006). The Dustbin Theory of Mind: A Cartesian Legacy? Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3:33-55.
  11. Lawrence Nolan (2005). The Ontological Argument as an Exercise in Cartesian Therapy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (4):521 - 562.
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  12. Lawrence Nolan & John Whipple (2005). Self-Knowledge in Descartes and Malebranche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):55-81.
  13. Lawrence Nolan (1998). Descartes' Theory of Universals. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):161-180.
  14. Lawrence Nolan (1998). Reductionism and Nominalism in Descartes's Theory of Attributes', Ybpio 16: 129-40.(1997b),'The Ontological Status of Cartesian Natures'. [REVIEW] Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78:164-94.
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  15. Lawrence Nolan (1997). Reductionism and Nominalism in Descartes's Theory of Attributes. Topoi 16 (2):129-140.
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  16. Lawrence Nolan (1997). The Ontological Status of Cartesian Natures. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):169–194.
    In the Fifth Meditation, Descartes makes a remarkable claim about the ontological status of geometrical figures. He asserts that an object such as a triangle has a 'true and immutable nature' that does not depend on the mind, yet has being even if there are no triangles existing in the world. This statement has led many commentators to assume that Descartes is a Platonist regarding essences and in the philosophy of mathematics. One problem with this seemingly natural reading is that (...)
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