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  1. Lawrence Quill (2011). The Disappearance of Adulthood. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (4):327-341.
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  2. Lawrence Quill (2010). Political Hypocrisy and the Role of Professionals. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):197-210.
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  3. Barry Clarke & Lawrence Quill (2009). Augustine, Arendt, and Anthropy. Sophia 48 (3):253-265.
    Arendt’s theoretical influence is generally traced to Heidegger and experientially to the traumatic events that occurred in Europe during the Second World War. Here, we suggest that Arendt’s conception of politics may be usefully enriched via a proto-anthropic principle found in Augustine and adopted by Arendt throughout her writings. By appealing to this anthropic principle; that without a spectator there could be no world; a profound connection is made between the ‘cosmic jackpot’ of life in the universe and the uniquely (...)
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  4. Lawrence Quill (2009). After Philia? Friendship, the Market, and Late Modernity. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (2):32-43.
    This paper offers some critical thoughts concerning the concept of "civic" or "political" friendship within commercial societies. In response to Badhwar's suggestion (2008) that the "free market" provides the best opportunities for political friendship, I argue that civic philia cannot be reduced to a form of "market-friendship." This was already apparent to early advocates of the market who recognized the fragility of friendship under capitalism. Subsequent attempts to address this dilemma bring into focus the deficiency of market friendships and the (...)
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  5. Lawrence Quill (2006). Liberty After Liberalism: Civic Republicanism in a Global Age. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Liberty after Liberalism frees the concept of the active citizen from both the territorial confines of the nation-state and the limits imposed by republican, city-state models. Lawrence Quill advances a theory of global republicanism, one that is able to respond directly to the changing realities of political life. By adopting a "publicly ironic" approach to politics, Quill revives the idea of public freedom within a global context thereby providing an important supplement to contemporary theories of cosmopolitan democracy.
     
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