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  1. Lawrence W. Hyman (1973). Autonomy and Distance in a Literary Work: A New Approach to Contextualism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (4):467-471.
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  2.  69
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1984). Morality and Literature—the Necessary Conflict. British Journal of Aesthetics 24 (2):149-155.
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  3.  60
    Salvator Cannavo & Lawrence W. Hyman (1965). Literary Uniqueness and Critical Communication. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (2):144-158.
    We shall give reconsideration to the problem of communicating the allegedly unique and unprecedented aspects that may be possessed by a literary work. In doing this we will distinguish two senses of uniqueness. The first of these, which we call objective uniqueness, is communicated without fundamental difficulty. It is given by a definite description in terms of properties which are entirely familiar but which occur in an unprecedented combination. Criticism’s overall task, however, demands concern for a second notion of uniqueness, (...)
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  4.  46
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1986). A Defence of Aesthetic Experience: In Reply to George Dickie. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (1):62-63.
    Our response to representational art can be called "aesthetic" even if we are not "detached from cognitive and moral matters." for the pleasure we receive from "huckleberry finn" (dickie's example) is not based on its historical or sociological accuracy, Or on our agreement with its moral statements. We enjoy and value the novel because of its wit and irony, Which subvert and so transcend its cognitive and moral truths.
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  5.  22
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1971). Literature and Morality in Contemporary Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (1):83-86.
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  6.  17
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1980). A Defense of Intrinsic Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (4):451.
  7.  23
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1966). Moral Values and the Literary Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (4):539-547.
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  8.  5
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1981). The New Irrelevance of the Truth-Standard. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (2):199.
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  9.  13
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1979). Moral Attitudes and the Literary Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (2):159-165.
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  10.  12
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1989). Art's Autonomy is its Morality: A Reply to Casey Haskins on Kant. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):376-377.
  11.  1
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1975). The "New Contextualism" Has Arrived: A Reply to Edward Wasiolek. Critical Inquiry 2 (2):380-385.
    I agree with much of what is said in this article; and I also will quote Roland Barthes, but for a different purpose. But I believe that it is a mistake to judge contextualism by its theory rather than its practice. If we look carefully at what is actually done in contextualist criticism, we will find that the "contradictions in its basic premises" which trouble Wasiolek have also allowed it to overcome the limitations that a strict construction of "autonomy" would (...)
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  12.  1
    Lawrence W. Hyman (1980). Harpsichord Exercises and the My Lai Massacre. Critical Inquiry 6 (4):739-742.
    That there is something not altogether honest about a didactic novel can be seen once we imagine a novel which violates our political sympathies or our moral principles, such as a novel that shows the Nazis or the American soldiers at My Lai as heroes. We certainly would not like this novel. But could we refute it because of our certain knowledge that these men, in real life, were murderers? I don't think so, since a skillful writer could easily make (...)
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