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  1. Carla Restrepo, Lawrence R. Walker, Aaron B. Shiels, Rainer Bussmann, Lieven Claessens, Simey Fisch, Pablo Lozano, Girish Negi, Leonardo Paolini & Germán Poveda (2009). Landsliding and its Multiscale Influence on Mountainscapes. BioScience 59 (8):685-698.
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  2. Lawrence Walker & Jeremy Frimer (2009). 'The Song Remains the Same': Rebuttal to Sherblom's Re-Envisioning of the Legacy of the Care Challenge. Journal of Moral Education 38 (1):53-68.
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  3. Jeremy A. Frimer & Lawrence J. Walker (2008). Towards a New Paradigm of Moral Personhood. Journal of Moral Education 37 (3):333-356.
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  4. Lawrence Walker (2004). Kohlberg and the Structural-Developmental Approach to Moral Psychology. In David C. Thomasma & David N. Weisstub (eds.), The Variables of Moral Capacity. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 43--56.
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  5. Lawrence J. Walker (2003). Morality, Religion, Spirituality—the Value of Saintliness. Journal of Moral Education 32 (4):373-384.
    This article discusses William James's notion, propounded in his Varieties of Religious Experience (1902), that authentic religious experience should be evidenced in mature moral functioning??the value of saintliness?. Support for this and his other ideas relevant to the intersection of morality and religion was adduced from a review of current research, which examined the following topics: the faith commitments of actual moral exemplars; the religious reasoning of people in handling moral problems; the personality profiles ascribed to moral, religious and spiritual (...)
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  6. Lawrence J. Walker (2002). The Model and the Measure: An Appraisal of the Minnesota Approach to Moral Development. Journal of Moral Education 31 (3):353-367.
    This review provides a critical appraisal of two of the more significant contributions of the Minnesota approach to moral development. One contribution is the componential model which describes the four psychological components underlying moral behaviour. Evaluation of this model focuses on the adequacy of its synthesis of disparate processes in moral functioning, its instruments for assessing the four components, and its framework for moral education. A second contribution entails the conceptual and methodological reformulations known as the neo-Kohlbergian approach. Evaluation of (...)
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  7. Lawrence J. Walker (1999). The Family Context for Moral Development. Journal of Moral Education 28 (3):261-264.
    Throughout the last generation of moral development theory and research, the family has not received adequate conceptual or empirical attention as a significant context for children's moral development. This editorial discusses some of the possible reasons for this neglect which is indicative of some of the biases that pervade the field. Several issues concerning the role of parents and the family are identified, and an overview of the various contributions to this special issue is provided.
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  8. Lawrence J. Walker (1999). The Perceived Personality of Moral Exemplars. Journal of Moral Education 28 (2):145-162.
    Contemporary moral psychology and education overemphasise rationality and neglect moral virtues and personality that must be part of a comprehensive understanding of moral functioning. The purpose of this study was to delineate the perceived personality characteristics of moral exemplars using the template of the Five-Factor Model which represents the fundamental dimensions of personality, and to compare that trait description with those for related types of exemplars. Participants were 120 adults from across the lifespan (17-91 years) who provided free-listing descriptions of (...)
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  9. Lawrence J. Walker & Karl H. Hennig (1999). Parenting Style and the Development of Moral Reasoning. Journal of Moral Education 28 (3):359-374.
    This paper addresses the polarisation among theoretical perspectives in moral psychology regarding the relative significance of parents and peers in children's moral development and, in particular, the short shrift given the family context by cognitive-developmental theory. We contend that parents do play a significant role in this area of their children's development. Research findings from two studies are presented which indicate that parents' interaction styles, ego functioning and level of moral reasoning used in discussion are predictive of children's subsequent moral (...)
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  10. John H. Taylor & Lawrence J. Walker (1997). Moral Climate and the Development of Moral Reasoning: The Effects of Dyadic Discussions Between Young Offenders. Journal of Moral Education 26 (1):21-43.
    Abstract Cognitive?developmental theory claims that moral reasoning can be developed through discussion with others, especially those at a higher stage. This study examined two social/contextual factors that may mediate such cognitive processes in moral development: socio?metric status and moral climate. Socio?metric status was studied because participants were 101 institutionalised young offenders with established differences in peer status. Moral climate was studied because participants came from residential units that varied markedly in programme activities. Participants were assessed for moral reasoning, perceptions of (...)
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  11. Lawrence J. Walker & Thomas J. Moran (1991). Moral Reasoning in a Communist Chinese Society. Journal of Moral Education 20 (2):139-155.
    Abstract This study examined the cross?cultural universality of Kohlberg's theory of moral reasoning development in the People's Republic of China??a culture quite different from the one out of which the theory arose. In particular, the applicability of the theory was evaluated in terms of its comprehensiveness and the validity of the moral stage model. Participants were 52 adolescents and adults, drawn from five groups: moral leaders, intellectuals, workers, college and junior high school students. In individual interviews they responded to hypothetical (...)
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