Search results for 'Lawyers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Richard Thomas, Silk Chambers, Paul Edmonds, Canberra Criminal Lawyers, Keith Bradley, Bradley Allen Lawyers, Marcus Hassall, Henry Parkes Chambers, Q. C. Ben Salmon & Blackburn Chambers (forthcoming). CPD Program February—March 2012. Ethos.score: 30.0
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  2. Michael Flynn, Carolyn Pope, Councillor Jayne Reece, Richard Refshauge Sc, Bill Redpath, Peter Romano, Athol Opas, Jo Clay, Tim Sharman & Higgins Lawyers (forthcoming). AGM Members Lunch. Ethos.score: 30.0
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  3. Capital Lawyers, Daniel D. Steiner & Mr Daniel Steiner (forthcoming). Advertising Legal Services in NSW. Ethos.score: 30.0
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  4. Richard Winter (2011). The Principled Legal Firm: Insights Into the Professional Ideals and Ethical Values of Partners and Lawyers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):297 - 306.score: 24.0
    Understanding how the professional ideals and values of partners influence lawyers' everyday life is a relatively unexplored area given the inherent difficulties of gaining access to lawyers. This case study sheds light on the professional ideals and ethical values of partners and lawyers in a mid-tier Sydney law firm. Semi-structured interviews with partners and lawyers/legal clerks reveal how partners' professional ideals and ethical values play a pivotal role in: (1) upholding positive normative evaluations of lawyer/firm propriety (...)
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  5. Gintaras Šapoka (2011). Soviet Criminal Justice Evaluation in Lithuanian Immigrants Lawyers Research (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (2):455-466.score: 24.0
    In the history of Lithuania during the period between the two world wars, the criminal law sources were received from Russia (Criminal Statute of 1903) and adapted for the requirements of those States, where the conditions of life were notably different from those in Lithuania. The Criminal Statute of 1903 was the main criminal law source in Lithuania until 1940. Prior to the second occupation—the return of the Soviets—tens of thousands of Lithuanian citizens fled to the West, including a very (...)
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  6. Alfredas Kiškis (2011). New Lawyers - Surgeons without Knowledge of Anatomy and Physiology (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (3):1195-1219.score: 24.0
    Over the past few years, universities in Lithuania have make changes to the legal study programs—obligatory subject Criminology moved to list of alternative optional subjects. Therefore, is increasing the number of new lawyers, who have not studied criminology, which thinking about criminals, crime victims, crime, its causes and successful impact on crime, is based on stereotype understanding of a few centuries ago. However, the new lawyers, being professionals, pre-trial investigators, advocates, prosecutors, judges play a crucial role in criminal (...)
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  7. Taiwo A. Oriola (2010). The Use of Legal Software by Non-Lawyers and the Perils of Unauthorised Practice of Law Charges in the United States: A Review of Jayson Reynoso Decision. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (3):285-309.score: 20.0
    This paper critically reviews the judgment of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit In re: Jayson Reynoso: Frankfort Digital Services et al., v. Sara L. Kistler, United States Trustee et al. (2007) 447 F.3d 1117. The appellants, who were non-lawyers, were indicted with unauthorised practice of law for offering bankruptcy petition services via online legal software or expert systems in law configured for filing bankruptcy petition forms. The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth (...)
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  8. Katherine Hall & Vivien Holmes, The Power of Rationalization to Influence Lawyers' Decisions to Act Unethically.score: 18.0
    This article explores the psychological literature on rationalization and connects it with contemporary questions about the role of in-house lawyers in ethical dilemmas. Using the case study of AWB Ltd, the exclusive marketer of Australian wheat exports overseas, it suggests that rationalizations were influential in the perpetuation by in-house lawyers of AWB's payment of kickbacks to the Iraqi regime. The article explores how lawyers' professional rationalizations can work together with commercial imperatives to prevent in-house lawyers from (...)
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  9. David Luban, Lawyers as Upholders of Human Dignity (When They Aren't Busy Assaulting It).score: 18.0
    David Luban argues in this lecture that the moral foundation of the lawyer's profession lies in the defense of human dignity-and the chief moral danger facing the profession arises when lawyers assault human dignity rather than defend it. The concept of human dignity has a rich philosophical tradition, with some philosophers identifying human dignity as a metaphysical property of individuals-a property such as having a soul, or possessing autonomy. Luban argues instead that human dignity is a relational property of (...)
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  10. M. B. E. Smith (1990). Should Lawyers Listen to Philosophers About Legal Ethics? Law and Philosophy 9 (1):67 - 93.score: 18.0
    In the recent spate of philosophers' writing on legal ethics, most contend that lawyers' professional role exposes them to great risk of moral wrongdoing; and some even conclude that the role's demands inevitably corrupt lawyers' characters. In assessing their arguments, I take up three questions: (1) whether philosophers' training and experience give them authority to scold lawyers; (2) whether anything substantive has emerged in the scolding that lawyers are morally bound to take to heart; and (3) (...)
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  11. Sigman L. Splichal (1997). Media Lawyers as Factors in the Ethical Decisions of Journalists. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (2):101 – 108.score: 18.0
    Me d i a lawyers were surveyed about their perceptions of journalism ethics, whether they discussed journalism ethics with their media clients, and whether they believed such nonlegal counseling were appropriate. The study found that most media lawyers do contribute to ethical decision making i n news organizations and believe the practice appropriate. It concludes that, as a result, indust y and academic proponents of journalistic ethics should target not only journalists but also media lawyers in their (...)
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  12. Alexander A. Guerrero (2012). Lawyers, Context, and Legitimacy: A New Theory of Legal Ethics. Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics 25 (1):107-164.score: 18.0
    Even good lawyers get a bad rap. One explanation for this is that the professional rules governing lawyers permit and even require behavior that strikes many as immoral. The standard accounts of legal ethics that seek to defend these professional rules do little to dispel this air of immorality. The revisionary accounts of legal ethics that criticize the professional rules inject a hearty dose of morality, but at the cost of leaving lawyers unrecognizable as lawyers. This (...)
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  13. Erik A. Anderson (2013). A Defense of the 'Sterility Objection' to the New Natural Lawyers' Argument Against Same-Sex Marriage. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):759-775.score: 18.0
    The “new natural lawyers” (NNLs) are a prolific group of philosophers, theologians, and political theorists that includes John Finnis, Robert George, Patrick Lee, Gerard Bradley, and Germain Grisez, among others. These thinkers have devoted themselves to developing and defending a traditional sexual ethic according to which homosexual sexual acts are immoral per se and marriage ought to remain an exclusively heterosexual institution. The sterility objection holds that the NNLs are guilty of making an arbitrary and irrational distinction between same-sex (...)
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  14. Barbara Robin Mescher (2008). The Business of Commercial Legal Advice and the Ethical Implications for Lawyers and Their Clients. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):913 - 926.score: 18.0
    Company directors and executives seek legal advice outside the company on a regular basis. This advice is meant to be given within the context of the lawyers’ professional obligations and ethical practise. What clients may not appreciate is there is often a conflict of interest between the lawyers’ professional and ethical concerns and the legal advice business. If lawyers follow their business interests, their advice may be incomplete especially in relation to the ethical consequences of that advice. (...)
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  15. Adrian Evans & Helen Forgasz (2013). Framing Lawyers' Choices: Factor Analysis of a Psychological Scale to Self-Assess Lawyers' Ethical Preferences. Legal Ethics 16 (1):134-161.score: 18.0
    Collectively, lawyers probably seek in vain to be sufficiently trusted, even when most individual lawyers appear to do their utmost to behave responsibly. Efforts to address lawyers' behavioural failures remain an important social policy objective and a professional obligation. In this article we argue that it is politically sensible and socially responsible for the legal profession to continue to address its misbehaving members in a more fundamental manner than just the post-facto disciplinary process. We suggest that pre-emptive (...)
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  16. Donna Buckingham (2012). Disciplining Lawyers in New Zealand: Re-Pinning the Badge of 'Professionalism'. Legal Ethics 15 (1):57-82.score: 18.0
    On 1 August 2008 the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 came into force. It provides the terms of the current regulatory bargain struck between the state and the New Zealand legal profession. Barely 16 months later the profession was served notice that the basis of that bargain might radically change. To an academic lawyer with a practising certificate, this is both a tantalising research opportunity as well as a professionally unsettling prospect. Part 1 of this paper explores the current (...)
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  17. Donna Buckingham (2012). Putting the Legal House in Order: Responses to New Zealand Lawyers Who Break Trust. Legal Ethics 15 (2):315-334.score: 18.0
    Governance and discipline of the legal profession is a highly topical issue in the New Zealand and has been the subject of recent reform, with a move to a more co-regulatory structure. An explanation of that context follows, together with an overview of how the Disciplinary Tribunal under the Law Practitioners Act 1982 and its successor under the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 approach strike-off or suspension as the penalty in what would currently be termed 'misconduct' cases. Case studies (...)
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  18. Lillian Corbin (2013). Australian Lawyers as Public Citizens. Legal Ethics 16 (1):57-72.score: 18.0
    While debate continues over the role of the lawyer in society, this article notes that the recently amended professional conduct rules of both barristers and solicitors and the proposed draft National Law prioritise the duty to the court and the administration of justice. In addition, the Australian Learning and Teaching Council's threshold learning outcomes for legal education corroborate these obligations when they assert that the role of a lawyer includes a professional responsibility to promote justice in service to the community. (...)
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  19. Rachel Spencer (2012). Legal Ethics and the Media: Are the Ethics of Lawyers and Journalists Irretrievably at Odds? Legal Ethics 15 (1):83-110.score: 18.0
    Descriptions of the relationship between lawyers and journalists range from 'uneasy' and 'sometimes prickly' to 'strained and often combatant.' This paper explores the ethical frameworks within which lawyers and journalists work and analyses the differences between the two, especially in the context of court reporting. It begins with a consideration of whether or not journalists are members of a profession, recognising that one marker of a profession is the existence of an ethical code. The codes of ethics of (...)
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  20. Joanne Stagg-Taylor (2012). Lawyers' Business: Conflicts of Duties Arising From Lawyers' Business Models. Legal Ethics 14 (2):173-192.score: 18.0
    In Australia, since 2004, there has been a move to expand the range of models for legal practice. Lawyers may now incorporate a legal practice, which may have non-legal directors and shareholders. They may also enter into a partnership with a range of non-legal professional partners. This change is happening at the same time that legal practice culture is moving from a professional service model to a business-oriented model. Increased pressures have been thrown into the mix by the global (...)
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  21. Pam Stewart & Maxine Evers (2010). The Requirement That Lawyers Certify Reasonable Prospects of Success: Must 21st Century Lawyers Boldly Go Where No Lawyer has Gone Before? Legal Ethics 13 (1):1-38.score: 18.0
    There is a growing trend in Australia to require lawyers to certify reasonable prospects of success for the cases they bring and defend. New South Wales has led the way with the Legal Profession Act 2004 (NSW) Pt 3.2 Division 10 requiring legal practitioners to certify reasonable prospects of success in all claims for damages. The requirement places a significant onus on lawyers to make a judgment about the merits of a case before it is begun, yet the (...)
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  22. Nigel Duncan (2010). Preparing Ethical Lawyers: A Prescription and a Practical Proposal. Legal Ethics 13 (1):79-92.score: 18.0
    This report proposes a method of making progress in developing the ethics project in legal education. It presents the findings of research into how ethics is currently taught in a number of different jurisdictions and then considers ways in which an effective community of practice might be developed. This involves establishing effective methods of dissemination and collaboration amongst all those interested in developing ethical legal professionals. The report explores ways of using Web 2.0 technologies to achieve these goals. Finally, it (...)
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  23. Vivien Holmes, Tony Foley, Stephen Tang & Margie Rowe (2012). Practising Professionalism: Observations From an Empirical Study of New Australian Lawyers. Legal Ethics 15 (1):29-55.score: 18.0
    Many suggest that professionalism as traditionally understood is all but dead in today's legal marketplace. Some scholars believe that 'professional' orientations based on managerialism and influenced by profitability have seen the demise of the lawyer's traditional professional identity. This paper argues otherwise. A pilot qualitative study of new Australian lawyers indicates that professional ideals can still flourish. Participants both understood the traditional ideals and sought to incorporate them in their own developing sense of professionalism. This paper reviews the experiences (...)
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  24. Deborah L. Rhode (ed.) (2003). Ethics in Practice: Lawyers' Roles, Responsibilities, and Regulation. OUP USA.score: 18.0
    Lawyers' ethics have been condemned for centuries, but they received little scholarly scrutiny until the last few decades. Ethics in Practice brings together leading experts in the emerging field of legal ethics to discuss the central dilemmas of practicing law. This collection cuts across conventional disciplinary boundaries to address the roles, responsibilities, and regulation of contemporary lawyers. Contributors address common concerns from diverse perspectives, including philosophy, psychology, economics, political science, and organizational behavior. Topics include the nature of professions, (...)
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  25. Bruce Kimball (1988). The Inclination of Modern Jurists to Associate Lawyers with Doctors: Plato's Response inGorgias 464–465. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):17-31.score: 18.0
    From the turn of the century, jurists have tended to associate lawyers with doctors as professionals and tried to ground this association in an analogy between law and medicine. Paradoxically, such comparisons suggest that American law and medicine are not analogous, while an analogy proposed by Plato illumines more fundamental respects in which law and medicine might be truly analogous.
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  26. Leslie C. Levin (2012). Misbehaving Lawyers: Cross-Country Comparisons. Legal Ethics 15 (2):357-377.score: 18.0
    Lawyer misbehaviour occurs in every country and regulators often struggle to address it effectively. This article looks at six case studies of disciplined lawyers in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. It notes the similarities in the cases and to disciplined lawyers previously described in case studies in the United States. In particular, these case studies involved male lawyers predominantly working in solo or small firms who were insufficiently exposed to positive professional values (...)
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  27. Patrick Schmidt (2012). The Ethical Lives of Securities Lawyers. In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. The University of Chicago Press. 221.score: 18.0
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  28. Corey S. Shdaimah (2012). Legal Services Lawyers: When Conceptions of Lawyering and Values Clash. In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. The University of Chicago Press. 317.score: 18.0
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  29. David B. Wilkins (2012). Some Realism About Legal Realism for Lawyers: Assessing the Role of Context in Legal Ethics. In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. The University of Chicago Press. 25.score: 18.0
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  30. Stephen Daniels & Joanne Martin (2012). Personal Injury: Plaintiffs' Lawyers and the Tension Between Professional Norms and the Need to Generate Business. In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. The University of Chicago Press. 110.score: 18.0
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  31. Patrick Lenta (2003). Do Lawyers Need Philosophy? South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):82-97.score: 18.0
    Neo- pragmatists Richard Rorty and Stanley Fish have recently argued that philosophy has no consequences for legal practice (except, in the case of Fish, insofar as it carries rhetorical force). They have asserted not only that philosophy cannot provide absolute metaphysical foundations for legal practice, but also that philosophy cannot be used to criticise law. This essay examines Fish and Rorty's reasons for denying the practical force of philosophy. Although I agree with Rorty and Fish's non-foundationalism, I argue that in (...)
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  32. Leslie C. Levin (2012). Immigration Lawyers and the Lying Client. In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. The University of Chicago Press. 87.score: 18.0
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  33. David Luban (1988). Lawyers and Justice: An Ethical Study. Princeton University Press.score: 18.0
    This is a book about the ethics of the legal profession proceeding from one basic premise: our nation is so dependent on its lawyers that their ethical problems transform themselves into public difficulties.
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  34. Seow Hon Tan (2014). Law Firm Internships and the Making of Future Lawyers: An Empirical Study in Singapore. Legal Ethics 17 (1):79-106.score: 18.0
    This article examines the findings of an empirical study of law students from the Singapore Management University on their internship experiences at private law firms. As internships are frequently undertaken by law students, it is necessary for stakeholders to understand their impact on the values and ideals of law students in relation to the law and legal practice. This article seeks to increase the consciousness of law school educators, lawyers, and the professional bar about how law firm internships are (...)
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  35. Richard L. Abel (2008). Lawyers in the Dock: Learning From Attorney Disciplinary Procedings. OUP USA.score: 18.0
    For more than a decade, American lawyers have bewailed the ethical crisis in their profession, wringing their hands about its bad image. But their response has been limited to spending money on public relations, mandating education, and endlessly revising ethical rules. In this book, Richard Abel will argue that these measures will do little or nothing to solve the problems illustrated by the six disciplinary case studies featured in this book unless the legal monopoly enjoyed by attorneys in the (...)
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  36. John M. Conley & Lynn Mather (2012). Scientists at the Bar: The Professional World of Patent Lawyers. In Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.), Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. The University of Chicago Press. 245.score: 18.0
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  37. Francis J. Mootz Iii (2009). Vico and Imagination: An Ingenious Approach to Educating Lawyers with Semiotic Sensibility. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 22 (1):11-22.score: 18.0
    Law is a specialized semiotic realm, but lawyers generally are ignorant of this fact. Lawyers may manage meaning, but they also are managed by meaning. Seemingly trapped by the weight of pre-existing signs, their attempts to manage these meanings generally are limited to technical interventions and instrumentalist strategies. Signs have power over lawyers because they are embedded in narratives, a semiotic economy that confronts the lawyer as “given” even though it is dynamic and constantly under construction. Most (...)
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  38. Alice Woolley (2011). Legal Ethics and Regulatory Legitimacy : Regulating Lawyers for Personal Misconduct. In Reid Mortensen, Francesca Bartlett & Kieran Tranter (eds.), Alternative Perspectives on Lawyers and Legal Ethics: Reimagining the Profession. Routledge.score: 18.0
     
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  39. Francesca Bartlett (2011). The Role of Apologies in Lawyers' Professional Discipline. Legal Ethics 14 (1):49-72.score: 17.0
    We live in times of 'apology mania', says Lee Taft, or at least 'national conversation' about the role and meaning of apologies. Roy Brooks talks of an 'age of apology'. Some 10 years after these pronouncements, little has changed. Apologies are ubiquitous and debated in the public and political domain. And they continue to be used and imported into legal jurisdictions. For instance, legislation removes civil liability for saying 'sorry' in certain contexts and may reward apologies in mitigation of sentence.
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  40. Inga Zaleniene & Agne Tvaronaviciene (2010). The Main Features and Development Trends of Mediation in Lithuania: The Opportunities for Lawyers. Jurisprudence 119 (1):227-242.score: 17.0
    In this article the main features and development trends of mediation as an alternative dispute resolution method are analyzed in the legal environment of the Republic of Lithuania. Mediation is analyzed as one of the primary informal alternative dispute resolution processes during which the third neutral, which is not authorized to take a decision during negotiations, helps the parties solve their dispute and the main aim of this process is the peaceful resolution of the dispute and the renewal of social (...)
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  41. Mustafa M. Dagli (2008). Lawyers' Paradox. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 53:45-53.score: 16.0
    Justice is an important concept in philosophy since ancient times and a key phenomenon in human life (in societies). First a judge at a court, two sides, their witnesses, Lawyer-A and Lawyer-B are considered in this quasi-essay inquiry. Then pointed out that, which lawyer better develops his/her arguments, his/her side will be advantageous. Reality conceals on the one side, truth (and rightness) stands on the other. However this will be risky in social life; it may be understood by an ordinary (...)
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  42. William H. Simon (1998). The Practice of Justice: A Theory of Lawyers' Ethics. Harvard University Press.score: 16.0
    Citing the Lincoln Savings and Loan scandal, the Leo Frank murder trial, and other cases, author William Simon takes a fresh look at the ethics of lawyering.
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  43. Peter A. Joy (2012). Assessing Lawyers' Ethics: A Practitioner's Guide. Legal Ethics 15 (2):405-411.score: 16.0
    Peter A Joy reviews Assessing Lawyer's Ethics: A Practitioner's Guide by Adrian Evans.
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  44. Tim Dare (2001). Lawyers, Ethics, and To Kill a Mockingbird. Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):127-141.score: 15.0
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  45. Tim Dare (2001). Lawyers, Ethics, And. Philosophy and Literature 25 (1).score: 15.0
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  46. Susan Haack (2007). Peer Review and Publication: Lessons for Lawyers. Stetson Law Review 36 (3).score: 15.0
    Peer review and publication is one of the factors proposed in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. as indicia of the reliability of scientific testimony. This Article traces the origins of the peer-review system, the process by which it became standard at scientific and medical journals, and the many roles it now plays. Additionally, the Author articulates the epistemological rationale for pre-publication peer-review and the inherent limitations of the system as a scientific quality-control mechanism. The Article explores recent changes in (...)
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  47. Kenneth Kipnis (1991). Ethics and the Professional Responsibility of Lawyers. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (8):569 - 576.score: 15.0
    Applied ethics is sometimes understood on the engineering model: As engineers apply physics to human problems, so philosophers apply ethics to dilemmas of professional practice. It is argued that there is nothing in ethics comparable to physics. Using legal ethics as an example, it is suggested that political philosophy provides a better approach to understanding professional ethics. If, for example, the adversary system is a legitimate social institution, and if attorneys must adhere to certain principles in order for that institution (...)
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  48. Christoph Kletzer (2007). Lawyers and Commonplaces. Res Publica 13 (3):319-325.score: 15.0
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  49. Aulis Aarnio (2001). Lawyers' Professional Ethics-Do They Exist? Ratio Juris 14 (1):1-9.score: 15.0
  50. Matthew B. O'Brien (2013). Elizabeth Anscombe and the New Natural Lawyers on Intentional Action. National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly (1):47-56.score: 15.0
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