Search results for 'Lea Harty' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gaile Renegar, Christopher J. Webster, Steffen Stuerzebecher, Lea Harty, I. D. E. E., Beth Balkite, Taryn A. Rogalski-salter, Nadine Cohen, Brian B. Spear, Diane M. Barnes & Celia Brazell (2006). Returning Genetic Research Results to Individuals: Points-to-Consider. Bioethics 20 (1):24–36.score: 240.0
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  2. Sandra K. Prucka, Lester J. Arnold, John E. Brandt, Sandra Gilardi, Lea C. Harty, Feng Hong, Joanne Malia & David J. Pulford (2014). An Update to Returning Genetic Research Results to Individuals: Perspectives of the Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group. Bioethics 28 (8).score: 240.0
    The ease with which genotyping technologies generate tremendous amounts of data on research participants has been well chronicled, a feat that continues to become both faster and cheaper to perform. In parallel to these advances come additional ethical considerations and debates, one of which centers on providing individual research results and incidental findings back to research participants taking part in genetic research efforts. In 2006 the Industry Pharmacogenomics Working Group (I-PWG) offered some ‘Points-to-Consider’ on this topic within the context of (...)
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  3. Gaile Renegar, Christopher J. Webster, Steffen Stuerzebecher, Lea Harty, Susan E. Ide, Beth Balkite, Taryn A. Rogalski‐Salter, Nadine Cohen, Brian B. Spear & Diane M. Barnes (2006). Returning Genetic Research Results to Individuals: Points‐to‐Consider. Bioethics 20 (1):24-36.score: 240.0
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  4. Judith Lea, Clalire McLaughlin & Anthony de Vere (1996). Tributes to Kathleen Marguerite Lea, 1903-1995. The Chesterton Review 22 (3):377-382.score: 180.0
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  5. David Lea (2014). The Future of the Humanities in Today's Financial Markets. Educational Theory 64 (3):261-283.score: 60.0
    In this essay David Lea approaches the decline in the study and teaching of the humanities within the university context from a financial perspective. As humanities departments are either closed down or have their curriculum attenuated, it is obvious that the revenue previously available to support such programs has not been forthcoming. This change is often explained as the result of cost cutting necessary during periods of financial crisis, but this justification is belied by the fact that while the humanities (...)
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  6. Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley (2006). Money as Tool, Money as Drug: The Biological Psychology of a Strong Incentive. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):161-209.score: 30.0
    Why are people interested in money? Specifically, what could be the biological basis for the extraordinary incentive and reinforcing power of money, which seems to be unique to the human species? We identify two ways in which a commodity which is of no biological significance in itself can become a strong motivator. The first is if it is used as a tool, and by a metaphorical extension this is often applied to money: it is used instrumentally, in order to obtain (...)
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  7. David Lea (2008). The Expansion and Restructuring of Intellectual Property and its Implications for the Developing World. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):37 - 60.score: 30.0
    In this paper we begin with a reference to the work of Hernando de Soto The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else, and his characterization of the Western institution of formal property . We note the linkages that he sees between the institution and successful capitalist enterprise. Therefore, given the appropriateness of his analysis, it would appear to be worthwhile for developing and less developed countries to adjust their systems of ownership to conform (...)
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  8. David R. Lea (2011). The Managerial University and the Decline of Modern Thought. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (8):816-837.score: 30.0
    In this paper I discuss the managerial template that has become the normative model for the organization of the university. In the first part of the paper I explain the corporatization of academic life in terms of the functional relationships that make up the organizational components of the commercial enterprise and their inappropriateness for the life of the academy. Although there is at present a significant body of literature devoted to this issue, the goal of this paper is to explain (...)
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  9. David R. Lea (1994). Lockean Property Rights, Tully's Community Ownership, and Melanesian Customary Communal Ownership. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (1):117-132.score: 30.0
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  10. David R. Lea (1993). Melanesian Axiology, Communal Land Tenure, and the Prospect of Sustainable Development Within Papua New Guinea. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):89-101.score: 30.0
    It is the contention of this paper that some progress in alleviating the social and environmental problems which are beginning to face Papua New Guinea can be achieved by supporting traditional Melanesian values through maintaining the customary system of communal land tenure. In accordance with this aim, I will proceed to contrast certain Western attitudes towards individual freedom, selfinterested behaviour, individual and communal interests and private ownership with attitudes and values expressed in the traditional Melanesian approach. In order to demonstrate (...)
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  11. Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley (2006). Money: Motivation, Metaphors, and Mores. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):196-204.score: 30.0
    Our response amplifies our case that money is best seen as both a drug and a tool. Some commentators challenge our core assumptions: In this response we, therefore, explain in more detail why we assume that money is an exceptionally strong motivator, and that a biological explanation of money motivation is required. We also provide evidence to support those assumptions. Other commentators criticise our use of the drug metaphor, particularly arguing that it is empirically empty; and in our response we (...)
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  12. David R. Lea (1998). Aboriginal Entitlement and Conservative Theory. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):1–14.score: 30.0
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  13. David Lea (1999). Corporate and Public Responsibility, Stakeholder Theory and the Developing World. Business Ethics 8 (3):151–162.score: 30.0
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  14. David Lea (2006). From the Wright Brothers to Microsoft: Issues in the Moral Grounding of Intellectual Property Rights. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):579-598.score: 30.0
    Abstract: This paper considers the arguments that could support the proposition that intellectual property rights as applied to software have a moral basis. Undeniably, ownership rights were first applied to chattels and land and so we begin by considering the moral basis of these rights. We then consider if these arguments make moral sense when they are extended to intellectual phenomenon. We identified two principal moral defenses: one based on utilitarian concerns relating to human welfare, the other appeals to issues (...)
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  15. David Lea (2004). The Imperfect Nature of Corporate Responsibilities to Stakeholders. Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):201-217.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I specifically consider the issue of corporate governance and normative stakeholder theory. In doing so, I arguethat stakeholder theory and responsibilities to non-shareholder constituencies can be made more intelligible by reference to Kant’sconception of perfect and imperfect duties. I draw upon Onora O’Neill’s (1996) work, Towards Justice and Virtue: A Constructivist Account of Practical Reasoning. In her text O’Neill underlines a number of relevant issues including: the integration of particularist and universalist accounts of morality; the priority of (...)
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  16. Lesley Newson & Stephen Lea (2000). The Limits Imposed by Culture: Are Symmetry Preferences Evidence of a Recent Reproductive Strategy or a Common Primate Inheritance? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):618-619.score: 30.0
    Women's preference for symmetrical men need not have evolved as part of a good gene sexual selection (GGSS) reproductive strategy employed during recent human evolutionary history. It may be a remnant of the reproductive strategy of a perhaps promiscuous species which existed prior to the divergence of the human line from that of the bonobo and chimp.
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  17. W. H. Dittrich & S. E. G. Lea (1993). Intentionality, Mind and Folk Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):39-41.score: 30.0
    The comment addresses central issues of a "theory theory" approach as exemplified in Gopnik' and Goldman's BBS-articles. Gopnik, on the one hand, tries to demonstrate that empirical evidence from developmental psychology supports the view of a "theory theory" in which common sense beliefs are constructed to explain ourselves and others. Focusing the informational processing routes possibly involved we would like to argue that his main thesis (e.g. idea of intentionality as a cognitive construct) lacks support at least for two reasons: (...)
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  18. David Lea (1999). The Infelicities of Business Ethics in the Third World. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (3):421-438.score: 30.0
    In a recent paper Allen Buchanan makes a basic distinction between two types of ethical problems which arise in business: “genuine ethical dilemmas, in which the problem is to discover what one ought to do, when two or more valid ethical duties (or values orprinciples) conflict, and compliance problems, which occur when one knows what one’s moral obligations are, but experiences difficulty in fulfilling them due to pressures of self-interest or loyalty to group or organization.” Buchanan argues that most business (...)
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  19. David Lea (2002). Tully and de Soto on Uniformity and Diversity. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):55–68.score: 30.0
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  20. David Lea (2012). Professionalism in an Age of Financialization and Managerialism. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (1):25-50.score: 30.0
    Historically the professions have maintained a commitment to what MacIntyre calls the “internal goods of practice” as opposed to the external goods of practice associated with monetary compensation and activities directly related to monetary compensation. This paper argues that the growing financialization of the economy has fostered a climate of managerial control exemplified in the proliferation of auditing and procedures associated with auditing. Accordingly professionals, whose organizational function includes responsibility for the internal goods, are thereby frustrated in so far as (...)
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  21. R. Brown, D. C. Earle & S. E. G. Lea (1986). Not an Alternative Model for Intentionality in Vision. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):138.score: 30.0
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  22. Maui L. Hudson, Annabel L. M. Ahuriri-Driscoll, Marino G. Lea & Rod A. Lea (2007). Whakapapa – a Foundation for Genetic Research? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):43-49.score: 30.0
    Whakapapa is the foundation of traditional Māori social structure and it perpetuates a value base that locates people through their relationships to the physical and spiritual worlds. As part of a new envirogenomics research programme, researchers at the Institute of Environmental Science and Research (ESR) are developing a study with an iwi (tribe) to identify combinations of genetic and environmental factors that may contribute to current health status. A major objective of this study is to utilise whakapapa (genealogical information) to (...)
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  23. David R. Lea (1994). Christianity and Western Attitudes Towards the Natural Environment. History of European Ideas 18 (4):513-524.score: 30.0
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  24. David R. Lea (1997). Do Communitarian Values Justify Papua New Guinean and/or Fijian Systems of Land Tenure? Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):115-126.score: 30.0
    Communitarians have alleged a connection between according specialrights to community groupings and preserving the indigenous cultureand the social cohesion of the original community. This paperconcentrates upon special group rights associated with land tenurenow maintained by Fijian Mataqali and traditional land owninggroups in Papua New Guinea. The first section of the paper assessesand compares the social consequences of each of these systems withspecial attention to the preservation of traditional culture.However, in the case of Fiji, it is undeniable that the mataqaliland tenure (...)
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  25. Kathleen Lea (1991). Memories of Lewis as a Colleague. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):399-400.score: 30.0
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  26. Henry Charles Lea (1894). Occult Compensation. International Journal of Ethics 4 (3):285-308.score: 30.0
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  27. David R. Lea (1993). The Environmental Implications of Post Renaissance Christianity. Agriculture and Human Values 10 (4):50-57.score: 30.0
    Recently there has been considerable controversy over the environmental impact of Christian teaching. During the beginnings of our increased awareness of the ecological crisis, several strong papers appeared condemning Christianity for encouraging environmental exploitation. Recently a number of works have sought to defend the Judeo-Christian tradition by emphasizing different aspects of a message that allegedly promotes environmentally friendly behavior. Overall, however, these interpretations exhibit doubtful ontic significance. It is the contention of this paper that Christianity evolved profoundly after the Renaissance (...)
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  28. Stephen E. G. Lea (1991). Why Optimality is Not Worth Arguing About. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):225.score: 30.0
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  29. Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.) (2010). The Making of Human Concepts. OUP Oxford.score: 30.0
    Human adults appear different from other animals in their ability to form abstract mental representations that go beyond perceptual similarity. In short, they can conceptualize the world. This apparent uniqueness leads to an immediate puzzle: WHEN and HOW does this abstract system come into being? To answer this question we need to explore the origins of adult concepts, both developmentally and phylogenetically; When does the developing child acquire the ability to use abstract concepts? Does the transition occur around 2 years, (...)
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  30. Devin S. Johnson, Joshua M. London, Mary-Anne Lea & John W. Durban (2008). Continuous-Time Correlated Random Walk Model for Animal Telemetry Data. In Carolyn Merchant (ed.), Ecology. Humanity Books. 1208-1215.score: 30.0
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  31. David R. Lea (2008). A Historical Perspective on Ownership as Seen Through the Philosophies of Kant and Hegel. The European Legacy 2 (6):977-990.score: 30.0
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  32. David R. Lea (1994). A Jurisprudential Assessment of Nozick's Natural Right to Property with Reference to Melanesian Customary Rights. Sophia 33 (2):48-62.score: 30.0
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  33. David Lea (2009). From The Wright Brothers to Microsoft. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):579-598.score: 30.0
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  34. Daniel Lea (2010). Kurt Vonnegut's America (Review). Utopian Studies 21 (1):169-172.score: 30.0
  35. Jennifer Lea (2009). Liberation or Limitation? Understanding Iyengar Yoga as a Practice of the Self. Body and Society 15 (3):71-92.score: 30.0
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  36. S. E. G. Lea & S. M. Dow (1984). Optimization and Flexibility. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):110.score: 30.0
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  37. S. E. G. Lea (1985). Optimality: Sequences, Variability, Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (2):343.score: 30.0
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  38. Judith Lea (1990). The Chesterton Archives. The Chesterton Review 16 (2):139-139.score: 30.0
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  39. David Lea (forthcoming). The Infelicities of Business Ethics in the Third World: The Melanesian Context. Business Ethics Quarterly.score: 30.0
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  40. Stephen Lea (2001). Two Unconventional Approaches to the Future of Economics: Ecological Economics and Economic Psychology. World Futures 56 (4):351-367.score: 30.0
    (2001). Two unconventional approaches to the future of economics: Ecological economics and economic psychology. World Futures: Vol. 56, Values, Ethics and Econmics, Part II, pp. 351-367.
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  41. Martin D. S. Braine, David P. O'Brien, Ira A. Noveck, Mark C. Samuels, R. Brooke Lea, Shalom M. Fisch & Yingrui Yang (1995). Predicting Intermediate and Multiple Conclusions in Propositional Logic Inference Problems: Further Evidence for a Mental Logic. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 124 (3):263.score: 30.0
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  42. MС Corballis & S. E. G. Lea (2000). Comparative-Evolutionary Psychology. In Kurt Pawlik & Mark R. Rosenzweig (eds.), International Handbook of Psychology. Sage Publications Ltd.score: 30.0
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  43. Lenore Harty (1977). An Edition of a Fourteenth-Century Version of Andreas Saga Postola and Its Sources. Mediaeval Studies 39 (1):121-159.score: 30.0
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  44. Harold Harty, Linda Hamrick, Charles Ault & K. Samuel (1987). Gender Influences on Concept Structure Interrelatedness Competence. Science Education 71 (1):105-115.score: 30.0
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  45. F. A. Lea (1962). A Defence of Philosophy. London, Eyre & Spottiswoode.score: 30.0
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  46. Judith Lea (2006). A New Chesterton Monument. The Chesterton Review 32 (3-4):559-559.score: 30.0
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  47. Stephen Eg Lea (2010). Concept Learning in Nonprimate Mammals: In Search of Evidence. In Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.), The Making of Human Concepts. Oup Oxford.score: 30.0
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  48. John Lea (1999). Dall'integrazione all'esclusione: lo sviluppo delle politiche di prevenzione della criminalità nel Regno Unito. Polis 13 (1):77-98.score: 30.0
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  49. Stephen E. G. Lea & Roger M. Tarpy (1990). Extending the Evolutionary and Economic Analysis of Intertemporal Choice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):419-420.score: 30.0
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  50. S. E. G. Lea (1979). Homeostasis, Elasticity, and Reinforcer Interactions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):109.score: 30.0
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