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Profile: Leah Kalmanson (Drake University)
  1. Leah Kalmanson (2013). “The Bottomless Brightness of the Open Expanse”. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):283 - 293.
    The recently published collection Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School, edited by Bret Davis, Brian Schroeder, and Jason Wirth, gathers together the best in contemporary scholarship on the Kyoto School and its legacy. This review essay is an opportunity to raise questions about the implications of this scholarship and to reflect critically on the future of the field. Although early Kyoto School philosophers are renowned for their lofty intellectual rigor, almost every one at some point bemoaned the (...)
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  2. Leah Kalmanson (2011). Buddhism and Bell Hooks: Liberatory Aesthetics and the Radical Subjectivity of No-Self. Hypatia 27 (3):810 - 827.
    This article engages bell hooks's concept of �radical black subjectivity� through the lens of the Buddhist doctrine of no-self. Relying on the Zen theorist D?gen and on resources from Japanese aesthetics, I argue that non-attachment to the self clarifies hooks's claim that radical subjectivity unites our capacity for critical resistance with our capacity to appreciate beauty. I frame this argument in terms of hooks's concern that postmodernist identity critiques dismiss the identity claims of disempowered peoples. On the one hand, identity (...)
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  3. Leah Kalmanson (2011). Review of Robert Wilkinson, Nishida and Western Philosophy. [REVIEW] Sophia 50 (3):505-507.
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  4. Leah Kalmanson (2010). Levinas in Japan: The Ethics of Alterity and the Philosophy of No-Self. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):193-206.
    Does the Buddhist doctrine of no-self imply, simply put, no-other? Does this doctrine necessarily come into conflict with an ethics premised on the alterity of the other? This article explores these questions by situating Emmanuel Levinas’s ethics in the context of contemporary Japanese philosophy. The work of twentieth-century Japanese philosopher Watsuji Tetsurō provides a starting point from which to consider the ethics of the self-other relation in light of the Buddhist notion of emptiness. The philosophy of thirteenth-century Zen Master Dōgen (...)
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