Search results for 'Learning Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Social Philosophy (1973). Meaning and Structure: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language. Philosophical Books 14 (3):8-10.score: 300.0
    A review of a work in which a systematic and general theory of the nature of the conventions governing the semantics of a natural language is developed, with the object of offering a conceptual framework within which semantic phenomena can be understood in relation to syntax and to the communicative and social aspects of language. The empiricist theory of language is criticized for not supplying an adequate framework for the explanation of language learning. Taxonomy is a solution to the (...)
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  2. Yam San Chee (2014). Interrogating the Learning Sciences as a Design Science: Leveraging Insights From Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):89-103.score: 150.0
    Design research has been positioned as an important methodological contribution of the learning sciences. Despite the publication of a handbook on the subject, the practice of design research in education remains an eclectic collection of specific approaches implemented by different researchers and research groups. In this paper, I examine the learning sciences as a design science to identify its fundamental goals, methods, affiliations, and assumptions. I argue that inherent tensions arise when attempting to practice design research as an (...)
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  3. Kevin B. Korb (2004). Introduction: Machine Learning as Philosophy of Science. Minds and Machines 14 (4):433-440.score: 144.0
    I consider three aspects in which machine learning and philosophy of science can illuminate each other: methodology, inductive simplicity and theoretical terms. I examine the relations between the two subjects and conclude by claiming these relations to be very close.
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  4. Christopher Winch (1998). The Philosophy of Human Learning. Routledge.score: 138.0
    Christopher Winch launches a vigorous Wittgensteinian attack on both the "romantic" Rousseauian and the "scientific" cognitivist traditions in learning theory. These two schools, he argues, are more closely related than is commonly realized.
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  5. Gregory M. Nixon (2013). Scientism, Philosophy and Brain-Based Learning. Northwest Journal of Teacher Education 11 (2):113-144.score: 126.0
    Since educators are always looking for ways to improve their practice, and since empirical science is now accepted in our worldview as the final arbiter of truth, it is no surprise they have been lured toward cognitive neuroscience in hopes that discovering how the brain learns will provide a nutshell explanation for student learning in general. I argue that identifying the person with the brain is scientism (not science), that the brain is not the person, and that it is (...)
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  6. John Emery Murdoch & Edith Dudley Sylla (eds.) (1975). The Cultural Context of Medieval Learning: Proceedings of the First International Colloquium on Philosophy, Science, and Theology in the Middle Ages--September 1973. D. Reidel Pub. Co..score: 120.0
    JOHN E. MURDOCH AND EDITH DUDLEY SYLLA INTRODUCTION Conferences and colloquia are held and their results often published, but very rarely is any account ...
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  7. D. W. Hamlyn (1983). Perception, Learning, and the Self: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 120.0
    INTRODUCTION If there is one underlying implication in the following essays it is the inadequacy of the information-processing model for cognitive ...
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  8. Inna Semetsky & Joshua A. Delpech-Ramey (2012). Jung's Psychology and Deleuze's Philosophy: The Unconscious in Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (1):69-81.score: 114.0
    This paper addresses the unconscious dimension as articulated in Carl Jung's depth psychology and in Gilles Deleuze's philosophy. Jung's theory of the archetypes and Deleuze's pedagogy of the concept are two complementary resources that posit individuation as the goal of human development and self-education in practice. The paper asserts that educational theory should explore the role of the unconscious in learning, especially with regard to adult education in the process of learning from life-experiences. The integration of the (...)
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  9. Steinar Bøyum (2007). Philosophy and Language Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (1):43-56.score: 114.0
    In this paper, I explore different ways of picturing language learning in philosophy, all of them inspired by Wittgenstein and all of them concerned about scepticism of meaning. I start by outlining the two pictures of children and language learning that emerge from Kripke's famous reading of Wittgenstein. Next, I explore how social-pragmatic readings, represented by Meredith Williams, attempt to answer the sceptical anxieties. Finally, drawing somewhat on Stanley Cavell, I try to resolve these issues by investigating (...)
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  10. Patrick Stokes (2012). Philosophy Has Consequences! Encouraging Metacognition and Active Learning in the Ethics Classroom. Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):143-169.score: 114.0
    The importance of enchancing metacognition and encouraging active learning in philosophy teaching has been increasingly recognised in recent years. Yet traditional teaching methods have not always centralised helping students to become reflectively and critically aware of the quality and consistency of their own thinking. This is particularly relevant when teaching moral philosophy, where apparently inconsistent intuitions and responses are common. In this paper I discuss the theoretical basis of the relevance of metacognition and active learning for (...)
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  11. Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.) (2007). Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press.score: 108.0
    Understanding causal structure is a central task of human cognition. Causal learning underpins the development of our concepts and categories, our intuitive theories, and our capacities for planning, imagination and inference. During the last few years, there has been an interdisciplinary revolution in our understanding of learning and reasoning: Researchers in philosophy, psychology, and computation have discovered new mechanisms for learning the causal structure of the world. This new work provides a rigorous, formal basis for theory (...)
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  12. Lotta Jons (2014). Learning as Calling and Responding. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (5):481-493.score: 108.0
    According to Martin Buber’s philosophy of dialogue, our being-in-the-world is to be conceived of as an existential dialogue. Elsewhere, I have conceptualized the teacher–student-relation accordingly (see Jons 2008), as a matter of calling and responding. The conceptualization rests on a secularised notion of vocation, paving way for discovering, articulating and discerning pedagogical relations in a new way. In the present article, I take this conceptualization one step further, applying the concept of calling and responding to the pedagogical relation between (...)
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  13. Dorothea Frede & Brad Inwood (eds.) (2005). Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge University Press.score: 108.0
    Hellenistic philosophers and scholars laid the foundations upon which Western tradition developed analytical grammar, linguistics, philosophy of language and other disciplines. Building on the pioneering work of Plato, Aristotle and earlier thinkers, they developed a wide range of theories about the nature and origin of language. Ten essays explore the ancient theories, their philosophical adequacy, and their impact on later thinkers from Augustine through the Middle Ages.
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  14. Kevin T. Kelly, Oliver Schulte & Cory Juhl (1997). Learning Theory and the Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 64 (2):245-267.score: 102.0
    This paper places formal learning theory in a broader philosophical context and provides a glimpse of what the philosophy of induction looks like from a learning-theoretic point of view. Formal learning theory is compared with other standard approaches to the philosophy of induction. Thereafter, we present some results and examples indicating its unique character and philosophical interest, with special attention to its unified perspective on inductive uncertainty and uncomputability.
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  15. Kevin T. Kelly (1988). Formal Learning Theory and the Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:413 - 423.score: 102.0
    Formal learning theory is an approach to the study of inductive inference that has been developed by computer scientists. In this paper, I discuss the relevance of formal learning theory to such standard topics in the philosophy of science as underdetermination, realism, scientific progress, methodology, bounded rationality, the problem of induction, the logic of discovery, the theory of knowledge, the philosophy of artificial intelligence, and the philosophy of psychology.
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  16. Tim Connolly (2012). Learning Chinese Philosophy with Commentaries. Teaching Philosophy 35 (1):1-18.score: 102.0
    The last two decades have seen a resurgence of interest in the study of classical Chinese texts by means of the subsequent commentaries. New versions of works like the Analects and Mencius that include selected commentaries have begun to appear, making some view about the value of commentaries necessary simply for picking which edition of a text to read. In this paper, I consider the potential role of the 2000-year-old commentarial tradition in the teaching and learning of Chinese (...). Given the difficulty of the original works, does the addition of commentaries make things better or worse from a student’s perspective? How far should we go in emphasizing the role of commentary in interacting with the texts? (shrink)
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  17. Elizabeth Jelinek (2013). Using Small Group Learning in the Philosophy Classroom. Teaching Philosophy 36 (2):137-159.score: 102.0
    I advocate the use of small group learning in the philosophy classroom because it engages a broad cross-section of students and because it proves to be an effective way to teach critical thinking. In this article, I suggest small group activities that are useful for developing philosophical skills, and I propose methods for circumventing common logistical problems that can arise when implementing small group learning in the classroom. Ultimately, I show that small group learning is a (...)
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  18. William A. Rottschaefer (2009). Moral Agency and Moral Learning: Transforming Metaethics From a First to a Second Philosophy Enterprise. Behavior and Philosophy 37:195 - 216.score: 102.0
    Arguably, one of the most exciting recent advances in moral philosophy is the ongoing scientific naturalization of normative ethics and metaethics, in particular moral psychology. A relatively neglected area in these improvements that is centrally important for developing a scientifically based naturalistic metaethics concerns the nature and acquisition of successful moral agency. In this paper I lay out two examples of how empirically based findings help us to understand and explain some cases of successful moral agency. These are research (...)
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  19. Francis Bacon (1851/2001). The Advancement of Learning. Modern Library.score: 102.0
    Francis Bacon, lawyer, statesman, and philosopher, remains one of the most effectual thinkers in European intellectual history. We can trace his influence from Kant in the 1700s to Darwin a century later. The Advancement of Learning , first published in 1605, contains an unprecedented and thorough systematization of the whole range of human knowledge. Bacon’s argument that the sciences should move away from divine philosophy and embrace empirical observation would forever change the way philosophers and natural scientists interpret (...)
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  20. Michael Cholbi (2007). Intentional Learning as a Model for Philosophical Pedagogy. Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):35-58.score: 96.0
    The achievement of intentional learning is a powerful paradigm for the objectives and methods of the teaching of philosophy. This paradigm sees the objectives and methods of such teaching as based not simply on the mastery of content, but as rooted in attempts to shape the various affective and cognitive factors that influence students’ learning efforts. The goal of such pedagogy is to foster an intentional learning orientation, one characterized by self-awareness, active monitoring of the (...) process, and a desire for publicly certified expertise. I provide a number of examples of philosophy-specific teaching strategies that follow this paradigm. (shrink)
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  21. Paisley Livingston (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Cinema as Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):359-362.score: 96.0
    The idea that films can be philosophical, or in some sense 'do' philosophy, has recently found a number of prominent proponents. What is at stake here is generally more than the tepid claim that some documentaries about philosophy and related topics convey philosophically relevant content. Instead, the contention is that cinematic fictions, including popular movies such as The Matrix , make significant contributions to philosophy. Various more specific claims are linked to this basic idea. One, relatively weak, (...)
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  22. Vesa Taatila & Katariina Raij (2011). Philosophical Review of Pragmatism as a Basis for Learning by Developing Pedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):831-844.score: 96.0
    This article discusses the use of a pragmatic approach as the philosophical foundation of pedagogy in Finnish universities of applied sciences. It is presented that the mission of the universities of applied sciences falls into the interpretive paradigm of social sciences. This view is used as a starting point for a discussion about pragmatism in higher education. The Learning by Developing (LbD) action model is introduced, analyzed and compared to pragmatism. The paper concludes that, at least in practice-oriented academic (...)
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  23. Jon Williamson (2004). A Dynamic Interaction Between Machine Learning and the Philosophy of Science. Minds and Machines 14 (4):539-549.score: 96.0
    The relationship between machine learning and the philosophy of science can be classed as a dynamic interaction: a mutually beneficial connection between two autonomous fields that changes direction over time. I discuss the nature of this interaction and give a case study highlighting interactions between research on Bayesian networks in machine learning and research on causality and probability in the philosophy of science.
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  24. Paul R. Thagard (1990). Philosophy and Machine Learning. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):261-76.score: 96.0
    This article discusses the philosophical relevance of recent computational work on inductive inference being conducted in the rapidly growing branch of artificial intelligence called machine learning.
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  25. Jon Williamson, The Philosophy of Science and its Relation to Machine Learning.score: 96.0
    In this chapter I discuss connections between machine learning and the philosophy of science. First I consider the relationship between the two disciplines. There is a clear analogy between hypothesis choice in science and model selection in machine learning. While this analogy has been invoked to argue that the two disciplines are essentially doing the same thing and should merge, I maintain that the disciplines are distinct but related and that there is a dynamic interaction operating between (...)
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  26. Charalampos Toumasis (1997). The NCTM Standards and the Philosophy of Mathematics. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (3):317-330.score: 96.0
    It is argued that the philosophical and epistemological beliefs about the nature of mathematics have a significant influence on the way mathematics is taught at school. In this paper, the philosophy of mathematics of the NCTM's Standards is investigated by examining is explicit assumptions regarding the teaching and learning of school mathematics. The main conceptual tool used for this purpose is the model of two dichotomous philosophies of mathematics-absolutist versus- fallibilist and their relation to mathematics pedagogy. The main (...)
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  27. Sanjeev Kulkarni, Statistical Learning Theory as a Framework for the Philosophy of Induction.score: 96.0
    Statistical Learning Theory (e.g., Hastie et al. 2001; Vapnik 1998, 2000, 2006; Devroye, Györfi, Lugosi 1996) is the basic theory behind contemporary machine learning and pattern recognition. We suggest that the theory provides an excellent framework for the philosophy of induction (see also Harman and Kulkarni 2007).
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  28. Piotr Bołtuć (2007). Global Learning Environment in Philosophy. Dialogue and Universalism 17 (7-8):149-158.score: 96.0
    In this paper I present my thesis stated numerous times at APA and NACAP meetings, that the current shortage of online programs in philosophy presents adanger to the profession. I also show how this danger could be averted. I give a snapshot of what teaching philosophy online, and doing it well, looks like. I am a very partial spectator in this debate since the example I am referring to is the program at UIS which I designed and, with (...)
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  29. Laura Grams (2007). Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):153-154.score: 96.0
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  30. Christopher Ansell (2011). Pragmatist Democracy: Evolutionary Learning as Public Philosophy. Oup Usa.score: 96.0
    The philosophy of pragmatism advances an evolutionary, learning-oriented perspective that is problem-driven, reflexive, and deliberative.
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  31. Dominic Scott (1995). Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and its Successors. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
    Questions about learning and discovery have fascinated philosophers from Plato onwards. Does the mind bring innate resources of its own to the process of learning or does it rely wholly upon experience? Plato was the first philosopher to give an innatist response to this question and in doing so was to provoke the other major philosophers of ancient Greece to give their own rival explanations of learning. This book is the first to examine these theories of (...) in relation to each other. It presents an entirely new interpretation of the theory of recollection which also changes the way we understand the development of ancient philosophy after Plato. The final section of the book compares ancient theories of learning with the seventeenth-century debate about innate ideas, and finds that the relation between the two periods is far more interesting and complete than is usually supposed. (shrink)
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  32. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Philosophy/Psychology Collaboration (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Five).score: 90.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: How can philosophers and psychologists most fruitfully collaborate?
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  33. Victor Caston (2006). Review of Dorothea Frede (Ed.), Brad Inwood (Ed.), Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (5).score: 90.0
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  34. Paul Thompson & Kyle Whyte (2012). What Happens to Environmental Philosophy in a Wicked World? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):485-498.score: 90.0
    Abstract What is the significance of the wicked problems framework for environmental philosophy? In response to wicked problems, environmental scientists are starting to welcome the participation of social scientists, humanists, and the creative arts. We argue that the need for interdisciplinary approaches to wicked problems opens up a number of tasks that environmental philosophers have every right to undertake. The first task is for philosophers to explore new and promising ways of initiating philosophical research through conducting collaborative learning (...)
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  35. Mark Levensky (1971). Teaching and Learning Philosophy in a Classroom. Metaphilosophy 2 (3):277–291.score: 90.0
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  36. Joel Kupperman (1999). Learning From Asian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    In an attempt to bridge the vast divide between classical Asian thought and contemporary Western philosophy, Joel J. Kupperman finds that the two traditions do not, by and large, supply different answers to the same questions. Rather, each tradition is searching for answers to their own set of questions--mapping out distinct philosophical investigations. In this groundbreaking book, Kupperman argues that the foundational Indian and Chinese texts include lines of thought that can enrich current philosophical practice, and in some cases (...)
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  37. Claire Cassidy (2013). Philosophy with Children: Learning to Live Well. Childhood and Philosophy 8 (16):243-264.score: 90.0
    A filosofia com crianças, em todas as suas guisas, visa engendrar o pensamento filosófico e o raciocínio nas crianças. Muito é escrito sobre o que a participação na filosofia poderia fazer para a criança academicamente e emocionalmente. O que propomos aqui é que permitindo às crianças participar de diálogos filosóficos elas aprenderão uma abordagem que poderia dar suporte a sua participação na sociedade e que poderia envolvê-las na consideração e no arejamento de suas vistas, tomando decisões em suas interações e (...)
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  38. Fred Ablondi (2010). Absolute Beginners: Learning Philosophy by Learning Descartes and Berkeley. [REVIEW] Metascience 19 (3):385-389.score: 90.0
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  39. Patricia Sanborn Glassheim (1973). The Philosopher as Teacher: Articles, Comments, Correspondence. New Approaches to Teaching and Learning Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 4 (2):179–185.score: 90.0
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  40. James Warren (2006). Frede (D.), Inwood (B.) (Edd.) Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Pp. Xii + 353. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Cased, £50, US$85. ISBN: 0-521-84181-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (02):315-.score: 90.0
  41. Gerard L. Knieter (forthcoming). Teaching and Learning Philosophy in the Music Education Doctoral Program. Journal of Aesthetic Education.score: 90.0
     
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  42. Daniel Bell Leary (1931). Living and Learning, Philosophy of Education. Ne York, R. S. Smith, Inc..score: 90.0
     
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  43. James J. Pearce (2008). Learning to Think: An Introduction to Philosophy. Kendall/Hunt Pub..score: 90.0
    The job of philosophy -- Truth: a very deceptive subject -- Epistemology: how do you know? -- Philosophy of religion: does God exist? -- Metaphysics: what is real? -- Moral and ethical theory: between right and wrong -- Social and political theory: freedom, politics, and society.
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  44. Mark P. Silverman (1996). Self-Directed Learning: Philosophy and Implementation. Science and Education 5 (4):357-380.score: 90.0
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  45. Knud Illeris (ed.) (2009). Contemporary Theories of Learning: Learning Theorists -- In Their Own Words. Routledge.score: 84.0
    In this definitive collection of today's most influential learning theorists, sixteen world-renowned experts present their understanding of what learning is and ...
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  46. Richard Edwards, Gert Biesta & Mary Thorpe (eds.) (2009). Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching. Routledge.score: 84.0
    It specifically addressesWhat constitutes a context for learning?How do we engage the full resources of learners for learning?What are the relationships between ...
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  47. B. van Oers (ed.) (2008). The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    Learning is a changing phenomenon, depending on the advances in theory and research. This book presents a relatively new approach to learning, based on meaningful human activities in cultural practices and in collaboration with others. It draws extensively from the ideas of Lev Vygotsky and his recent followers. The book presents ideas that elaborate this learning theory and also gives recent developments and applications of this approach in a variety of educational situations in and outside of school. (...)
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  48. Lynsey Wolter (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):108-111.score: 84.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g. this; that guy over there ) are intimately connected to the context of use in that their reference is determined by demonstrations and/or the speaker's intentions. The semantics of demonstratives therefore has important implications not only for theories of reference, but for questions about how information from the context interacts with formal semantics. First treated by Kaplan as directly referential , demonstratives have recently been analyzed as quantifiers by King, and the choice between these two approaches (...)
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  49. John White (1997). Education and the End of Work: A New Philosophy of Work and Learning. Cassell.score: 84.0
    This book engages with widespread current anxieties about the future of work and its place in a fulfilled human life.
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  50. Malcolm R. Forster (1999). How Do Simple Rules `Fit to Reality' in a Complex World? Minds and Machines 9 (4):543-564.score: 84.0
    The theory of fast and frugal heuristics, developed in a new book called Simple Heuristics that make Us Smart (Gigerenzer, Todd, and the ABC Research Group, in press), includes two requirements for rational decision making. One is that decision rules are bounded in their rationality –- that rules are frugal in what they take into account, and therefore fast in their operation. The second is that the rules are ecologically adapted to the environment, which means that they `fit to reality.' (...)
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