Search results for 'Learning and scholarship History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Reginald Lane Poole (1920/1963). Illustrations of the History of Medieval Thought and Learning. Frankfurt A. M.,Minerva-Verlag.score: 282.0
    Not much of this work was done at Leip ig.
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  2. Christopher J. Berry (1994). David Allan Virtue, Learning and the Scottish Enlightenment: Ideals of Scholarship in Early Modern History, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 1993, Pp. Viii + 276. Utilitas 6 (02):332-.score: 243.0
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  3. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.score: 237.0
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
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  4. Edward Grant (2001). God and Reason in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    Between 1100 and 1600, the emphasis on reason in the learning and intellectual life of Western Europe became more pervasive and widespread than ever before in the history of human civilization. Of crucial significance was the invention of the university around 1200, within which reason was institutionalized and where it became a deeply embedded, permanent feature of Western thought and culture. It is therefore appropriate to speak of an Age of Reason in the Middle Ages, and to view (...)
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  5. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1974). Medieval Aspects of Renaissance Learning. Durham, N.C.,Duke University Press.score: 210.0
    The scholar and his public in the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance.--Thomism and the Italian thought of the Renaissance.--The contribution of religious orders to Renaissance thought and learning.--Bibliography (p. [115]-120).
     
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  6. Daniel B. Schwartz (2012). The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image. Princeton University Press.score: 201.0
    Ex-Jew, eternal Jew: early representations of the Jewish Spinoza -- Refining Spinoza: Moses Mendelssohn's response to the Amsterdam heretic -- The first modern Jew: Berthold Auerbach's Spinoza and the beginnings of an image -- A rebel against the past, a revealer of secrets: Salomon Rubin and the east European Maskilic Spinoza -- From the heights of Mount Scopus: Yosef Klausner and the Zionist rehabilitation of Spinoza -- Farewell, Spinoza: I. B. Singer and the tragicomedy of the Jewish Spinozist.
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  7. Dorothy L. Sayers (1948). The Lost Tools of Learning: Paper Read at a Vacation Course in Education, Oxford, 1947. Methuen.score: 201.0
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  8. Peter Becker & William Clark (eds.) (2001). Little Tools of Knowledge: Historical Essays on Academic and Bureaucratic Practices. University of Michigan Press.score: 183.0
    This volume brings historians of science and social historians together to consider the role of "little tools"--such as tables, reports, questionnaires, dossiers, index cards--in establishing academic and bureaucratic claims to authority and objectivity. From at least the eighteenth century onward, our science and society have been planned, surveyed, examined, and judged according to particular techniques of collecting and storing knowledge. Recently, the seemingly self-evident nature of these mundane epistemic and administrative tools, as well as the prose in which they are (...)
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  9. Gregg Stern (2009). Philosophy and Rabbinic Culture: Jewish Interpretation and Controversy in Medieval Languedoc. Routledge.score: 183.0
    Jewish learning and thought in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: implications of original philosophic work and the diffusion of philosophic learning in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: Jewish contacts with Christian intellectuals and Jewish thought regarding Christianity -- Meiri's transformation of Talmud study: philosophic spirituality in a halakhic key -- 1300: on the eve of the controversy -- 1300-1304: knowledge and authority in dispute -- 1304-1306: the controversy peaks -- The effects of the expulsion: Jewish philosophic culture in Roussillon and Provence.
     
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  10. F. Edward Cranz (2006). Reorientations of Western Thought From Antiquity to the Renaissance. Ashgate.score: 174.0
    The definitions and distinctions of thematics in this collection are of intrinsic interest, then, to Classical and Late Antique, Medieval, Renaissance, and ...
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  11. Franz Rosenthal (1970/2007). Knowledge Triumphant: The Concept of Knowledge in Medieval Islam. Brill.score: 174.0
    In "Knowledge Triumphant," Franz Rosenthal observes that the Islamic civilization is one that is essentially characterized by knowledge ("'ilm"), for "ilm is ...
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  12. Thomas A. Wilson (1995). Genealogy of the Way: The Construction and Uses of the Confucian Tradition in Late Imperial China. Stanford University Press.score: 174.0
    Beginning in the Southern Sung, one Confucian sect gradually came to dominate literati culture and, by the Ming dynasty, was canonized as state orthodoxy. This book is a historical and textual critique of the process by which claims to exclusive possession of the truth came to serve power. The author analyzes the formation of the Confucian canon and its role in the civil service examinations, the enshrinement of worthies in the Confucian temple, and the emergence of the Confucian anthology, activities (...)
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  13. Ruoshui Chen & Fansen Wang (eds.) (2005). Si Xiang Yu Xue Shu. Zhongguo da Bai Ke Quan Shu Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  14. Zhifeng Deng (2004). Wang Xue Yu Wan Ming de Shi Dao Fu Xing Yun Dong. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  15. Sinian Fu (2006). Zhongguo Gu Dai Si Xiang Yu Xue Shu Shi Lun. Guangxi Shi Fan da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  16. Zhaoguang Ge (2006). Xi Chao You Dong Feng: Wan Qing Min Chu Si Xiang, Zong Jiao Yu Xue Shu Shi Jiang. Shanghai Gu Ji Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  17. Bendong Gong (2009). Zhongguo Xian Dai Xue Shu Yan Jin: Cong Zhang Taiyan Dao Cheng Qianfan. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  18. Yousen He (2009). He Yousen Xian Sheng Xue Shu Lun Wen Ji. Guo Li Tai Wan da Xue Chu Ban Zhong Xin.score: 174.0
    Shang ce. Ru xue yu si xiang -- xia ce. Qing dai xue shu si chao.
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  19. Ludger Honnefelder (ed.) (2011). Albertus Magnus Und der Ursprung der Universitätsidee: Die Begegnung der Wissenschaftskulturen Im 13. Jahrhundert Und Die Entdeckung des Konzepts der Bildung Durch Wissenschaft. Berlin University Press.score: 174.0
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  20. Ludger Honnefelder (ed.) (2011). Albertus Magnus Und der Ursprung der Universitätsidee: Die Begegnung der Wissenschaftskulturen Im 13. Berlin University Press.score: 174.0
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  21. Qingzhang Lin (ed.) (2012). Zhongguo Xue Shu Si Xiang Yan Jiu Ji Kan. Hua Mulan Wen Hua Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  22. Zhongfeng Lu (2005). Lu Zhongfeng Wen Ji =. Shanghai Ci Shu Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  23. Zhitian Luo (2009). Jin Dai du Shu Ren de Si Xiang Shi Jie Yu Zhi Xue Qu Xiang. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  24. Martin Mulsow (2012). Prekäres Wissen: Eine Andere Ideengeschichte der Frühen Neuzeit. Suhrkamp.score: 174.0
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  25. Detlef Rohling (2012). Omne Scibile Est Discibile: Eine Untersuchung Zur Struktur Und Genese des Lehrens Und Lernens Bei Thomas von Aquin. Aschendorff Verlag.score: 174.0
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  26. Youguang Tu (2009). Tu Youguang Wen Cun =. Hua Zhong Ke Ji da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  27. Sumin Xu & Luming Shentu (eds.) (2009). Ming Qing Si Xiang Wen Hua Bian Qian. Nanjing da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 174.0
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  28. Daobin Xu (2012). Wan Pai Xue Shu Yu Chuan Cheng =. Huang Shan Shu She.score: 174.0
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  29. Yong-ju Yi (2009). Tong Asia Kŭndae Sasangnon: "Chŏnt'ong" Ŭi Haesŏk Kwa Ch'angjo. Ihaksa.score: 174.0
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  30. John Bock (2002). Learning, Life History, and Productivity. Human Nature 13 (2):161-197.score: 164.0
    This article introduces a new model of the relationship between growth and learning and tests a set of hypotheses related to the development of adult competency using time allocation, anthropometric, and experimental task performance data collected between 1992 and 1997 in a multiethnic community in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Building on seminal work in life history theory by Hawkes, Blurton Jones and associates, and Kaplan and associates, the punctuated development model presented here incorporates the effects of both growth (...)
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  31. Richard Wightman Fox & Robert B. Westbrook (eds.) (1998). In Face of the Facts: Moral Inquiry in American Scholarship. Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge.score: 135.0
    Recently there has been a renewed interest in moral inquiry among American scholars in a variety of disciplines. This collection of accessible essays by scholars in philosophy, political theory, psychology, history, literary studies, sociology, religious studies, anthropology, and legal studies affords a view of the current state of moral inquiry in the American academy, and it offers fresh departures for ethically informed, interdisciplinary scholarship. Seeking neither to reduce values to facts nor facts to values, these essays aim to (...)
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  32. Jeffrey Edward Green (2012). On the Difference Between a Pupil and a Historian of Ideas. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):84-110.score: 108.0
    Abstract This essay takes up the fundamental question of the proper place of history in the study of political thought through critical engagement with Mark Bevir's seminal work, The Logic of the History of Ideas . While I accept the claim of Bevir, as well as of other exponents of the so-called “Cambridge School,“ that there is a conceptual difference between historical and non-historical modes of reading past works of political philosophy, I resist the suggestion that this conceptual (...)
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  33. Jesse Goodman, Sarah Montgomery & Connie Ables (2010). Rorty's Social Theory and the Narrative of U.S. History Curriculum. Education and Culture 26 (1):3-22.score: 108.0
    Scholars have a history of crossing intellectual borders (Abbott, 2001). In particular, educators draw from a diversity of intellectuals upon which to base our understanding of, for example, schools and society, curriculum content, teaching, and learning. In addition to icons such as Marx, James, Freud, and Dewey, the works of the Frankfurt School (e.g., Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse), Foucault, Gilligan, Derrida, Gramsci, West, Arendt, and Fraser, just to name a few, have been used to guide our scholarship and (...)
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  34. Dirk Schlimm (2009). Learning From the Existence of Models: On Psychic Machines, Tortoises, and Computer Simulations. Synthese 169 (3):521 - 538.score: 98.0
    Using four examples of models and computer simulations from the history of psychology, I discuss some of the methodological aspects involved in their construction and use, and I illustrate how the existence of a model can demonstrate the viability of a hypothesis that had previously been deemed impossible on a priori grounds. This shows a new way in which scientists can learn from models that extends the analysis of Morgan (1999), who has identified the construction and manipulation of models (...)
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  35. Katharine MacDonald (2007). Cross-Cultural Comparison of Learning in Human Hunting. Human Nature 18 (4):386-402.score: 98.0
    This paper is a cross-cultural examination of the development of hunting skills and the implications for the debate on the role of learning in the evolution of human life history patterns. While life history theory has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the evolution of the human life course, other schools, such as cultural transmission and social learning theory, also provide theoretical insights. These disparate theories are reviewed, and alternative and exclusive predictions are identified. (...)
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  36. Michalinos Zembylas (2013). Pedagogies of Hauntology in History Education: Learning to Live with the Ghosts of Disappeared Victims of War and Dictatorship. Educational Theory 63 (1):69-86.score: 96.0
    Michalinos Zembylas examines how history education can be reconceived in terms of Jacques Derrida's notion of “hauntology,” that is, as an ongoing conversation with the “ghost” — in the case of this essay, the ghosts of disappeared victims of war and dictatorship. Here, Zembylas uses hauntology as both metaphor and pedagogical methodology for deconstructing the orthodoxies of academic history thinking and learning about “the disappeared.” As metaphor, hauntology evokes the figure of the ghost in order both to (...)
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  37. Pádraig Hogan (1998). The Politics of Identity and the Experience of Learning: Insights for Pluralism From Western Educational History. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):251-259.score: 96.0
    The eight short explorations in the first part of this paper attempt to identify some crucial developments in the history of Western learning which eclipsed pluralist educational practices in their (Socratic) infancy and thereafter, and which contributed to the widespread employment of education as a force for cultural uniformity, or assumed superiority. Drawing together the lessons of the first part with contemporary insights from hermeneutic philosophy, the second part sets forth briefly the promising educational possibilities for human self-understanding (...)
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  38. Herman Paul (2011). Performing History: How Historical Scholarship is Shaped by Epistemic Virtues. History and Theory 50 (1):1-19.score: 90.0
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  39. Steve Johnson (1998). Skills, Socrates and the Sophists: Learning From History. British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (2):201 - 213.score: 84.0
    The Sophists, and the Socratic response they provoked, are considered in order to elucidate issues raised by present-day skill-talk. These issues include: whether skills avoid questions of ends and truth; the existence of general skills, such as critical thinking; the importance of knowledge; skills and the personality; and some implications for teaching and philosophy.
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  40. David S. Owen (2005). Critical Theory and Learning From History. Radical Philosophy Review 8 (2):187-195.score: 84.0
    In this paper I utilize Martin Beck Matuštík’s intellectual biography of Habermas as a means for reflecting on the meaning that criticaltheory has for us in the wake of September 11. I argue that the significant contribution of Matuštík’s book is that it fruitfully continues theconversation about the meaning of critical theory by underscoring the sociohistorical contexts that frame Habermas’s intellectual engagements. Matuštík’s figure of the critical theorist as witness refocuses attention on the critical theorist in context, nevertheless as critical (...)
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  41. David Arnold (2010). Inquiry Learning: Making History Active. Ethos 18 (2):20.score: 84.0
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  42. Sven Ove Hansson (2001). Learning From History. Theoria 67 (1):1-3.score: 84.0
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  43. Robert Merrihew Adams (1994). Leibniz: Determinist, Theist, Idealist. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    Legendary since his own time as a universal genius, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) contributed significantly to almost every branch of learning. One of the creators of modern mathematics, and probably the most sophisticated logician between the Middle Ages and Frege, as well as a pioneer of ecumenical theology, he also wrote extensively on such diverse subjects as history, geology, and physics. But the part of his work that is most studied today is probably his writings in metaphysics, which (...)
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  44. Stephen A. White, Clearchus on Love.score: 81.0
    Clearchus of Soloi, a junior colleague of Aristotle's, devoted a work in at least two books to the topic of eros. Like most of what survives from his once substantial corpus, the remains of this work display wide learning, especially in history and literature, and a moralizing orientation. The work did not circulate widely; all that survives is a handful of passages in Athenaeus (frs. 21-35 Wehrli), most very brief. That is far too little to permit any reconstruction (...)
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  45. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 81.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  46. Ty-Ron Michael Douglas & Craig Peck (2013). Education by Any Means Necessary: Peoples of African Descent and Community-Based Pedagogical Spaces. Educational Studies 49 (1):67-91.score: 81.0
    This study examines how and why peoples of African descent access and utilize community-based pedagogical spaces that exist outside schools. Employing a theoretical framework that fuses historical methodology and border-crossing theory, the researchers review existing scholarship and primary documents to present an historical examination of how peoples of African descent have fought for and redefined education in nonschool educative venues. These findings inform the authors? analysis of results from an oral history project they conducted into how Black Bermudian (...)
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  47. Denis Dutton, How Can Values Be Taught in the University?score: 81.0
    Nevertheless, explicitly or implicitly, the university has always taught (by which I mean examined, evaluated, posited, reinforced) values, and I should think will always follow or circle the track of its origins. When higher education leapt or strutted out of the doors of the church (whether by license from the crown, permission of the diocese, or charters from guilds) it was extricating itself from the church's charge, where monastic schools and libraries were centers of learning and most students were (...)
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  48. S. F. Walker (1990). A Brief History of Connectionism and its Psychological Implications. AI and Society 4 (1):17-38.score: 80.0
    Critics of the computational connectionism of the last decade suggest that it shares undesirable features with earlier empiricist or associationist approaches, and with behaviourist theories of learning. To assess the accuracy of this charge the works of earlier writers are examined for the presence of such features, and brief accounts of those found are given for Herbert Spencer, William James and the learning theorists Thorndike, Pavlov and Hull. The idea that cognition depends on associative connections among large networks (...)
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  49. Rebecca Bliege Bird & Douglas W. Bird (2002). Constraints of Knowing or Constraints of Growing? Human Nature 13 (2):239-267.score: 80.0
    Recent theoretical models suggest that the difference between human and nonhuman primate life-history patterns may be due to a reliance on complex foraging strategies requiring extensive learning. These models predict that children should reach adult levels of efficiency faster when foraging is cognitively simple. We test this prediction with data on Meriam fishing, spearfishing, and shellfishing efficiency. For fishing and spearfishing, which are cognitively difficult, we can find no significant amount of variability in return rates because of experiential (...)
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  50. Teun Koetsier (2011). Routes of Learning: Highways, Pathways and Byways in the History of Mathematics. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (3):293-295.score: 78.0
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