Search results for 'Learning and scholarship History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Christopher J. Berry (1994). David Allan Virtue, Learning and the Scottish Enlightenment: Ideals of Scholarship in Early Modern History, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press, 1993, Pp. Viii + 276. Utilitas 6 (2):332.
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  2.  10
    Reginald Lane Poole (1920/1963). Illustrations of the History of Medieval Thought and Learning. Frankfurt A. M.,Minerva-Verlag.
    Not much of this work was done at Leip ig.
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  3.  18
    Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
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  4. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1974). Medieval Aspects of Renaissance Learning. Durham, N.C.,Duke University Press.
    The scholar and his public in the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance.--Thomism and the Italian thought of the Renaissance.--The contribution of religious orders to Renaissance thought and learning.--Bibliography (p. [115]-120).
     
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  5.  14
    John Bock (2002). Learning, Life History, and Productivity. Human Nature 13 (2):161-197.
    This article introduces a new model of the relationship between growth and learning and tests a set of hypotheses related to the development of adult competency using time allocation, anthropometric, and experimental task performance data collected between 1992 and 1997 in a multiethnic community in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Building on seminal work in life history theory by Hawkes, Blurton Jones and associates, and Kaplan and associates, the punctuated development model presented here incorporates the effects of both (...)
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  6.  21
    Daniel B. Schwartz (2012). The First Modern Jew: Spinoza and the History of an Image. Princeton University Press.
    Ex-Jew, eternal Jew: early representations of the Jewish Spinoza -- Refining Spinoza: Moses Mendelssohn's response to the Amsterdam heretic -- The first modern Jew: Berthold Auerbach's Spinoza and the beginnings of an image -- A rebel against the past, a revealer of secrets: Salomon Rubin and the east European Maskilic Spinoza -- From the heights of Mount Scopus: Yosef Klausner and the Zionist rehabilitation of Spinoza -- Farewell, Spinoza: I. B. Singer and the tragicomedy of the Jewish Spinozist.
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  7.  9
    Dorothy L. Sayers (1948). The Lost Tools of Learning: Paper Read at a Vacation Course in Education, Oxford, 1947. Methuen.
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  8.  24
    Edward Grant (2001). God and Reason in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.
    Between 1100 and 1600, the emphasis on reason in the learning and intellectual life of Western Europe became more pervasive and widespread than ever before in the history of human civilization. Of crucial significance was the invention of the university around 1200, within which reason was institutionalized and where it became a deeply embedded, permanent feature of Western thought and culture. It is therefore appropriate to speak of an Age of Reason in the Middle Ages, and to view (...)
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  9.  10
    Peter Becker & William Clark (eds.) (2001). Little Tools of Knowledge: Historical Essays on Academic and Bureaucratic Practices. University of Michigan Press.
    This volume brings historians of science and social historians together to consider the role of "little tools"--such as tables, reports, questionnaires, dossiers, index cards--in establishing academic and bureaucratic claims to authority and objectivity. From at least the eighteenth century onward, our science and society have been planned, surveyed, examined, and judged according to particular techniques of collecting and storing knowledge. Recently, the seemingly self-evident nature of these mundane epistemic and administrative tools, as well as the prose in which they are (...)
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  10. Gregg Stern (2009). Philosophy and Rabbinic Culture: Jewish Interpretation and Controversy in Medieval Languedoc. Routledge.
    Jewish learning and thought in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: implications of original philosophic work and the diffusion of philosophic learning in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: Jewish contacts with Christian intellectuals and Jewish thought regarding Christianity -- Meiri's transformation of Talmud study: philosophic spirituality in a halakhic key -- 1300: on the eve of the controversy -- 1300-1304: knowledge and authority in dispute -- 1304-1306: the controversy peaks -- The effects of the expulsion: Jewish philosophic culture in Roussillon and Provence.
     
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  11.  9
    Thomas A. Wilson (1995). Genealogy of the Way: The Construction and Uses of the Confucian Tradition in Late Imperial China. Stanford University Press.
    Beginning in the Southern Sung, one Confucian sect gradually came to dominate literati culture and, by the Ming dynasty, was canonized as state orthodoxy. This book is a historical and textual critique of the process by which claims to exclusive possession of the truth came to serve power. The author analyzes the formation of the Confucian canon and its role in the civil service examinations, the enshrinement of worthies in the Confucian temple, and the emergence of the Confucian (...)
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  12.  11
    Franz Rosenthal (1970/2007). Knowledge Triumphant: The Concept of Knowledge in Medieval Islam. Brill.
    In "Knowledge Triumphant," Franz Rosenthal observes that the Islamic civilization is one that is essentially characterized by knowledge ("'ilm"), for "ilm is ...
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  13. Ruoshui Chen & Fansen Wang (eds.) (2005). Si Xiang Yu Xue Shu. Zhongguo da Bai Ke Quan Shu Chu Ban She.
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  14.  59
    F. Edward Cranz (2006). Reorientations of Western Thought From Antiquity to the Renaissance. Ashgate.
    The definitions and distinctions of thematics in this collection are of intrinsic interest, then, to Classical and Late Antique, Medieval, Renaissance, and ...
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  15. Zhifeng Deng (2004). Wang Xue Yu Wan Ming de Shi Dao Fu Xing Yun Dong. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.
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  16. Sinian Fu (2006). Zhongguo Gu Dai Si Xiang Yu Xue Shu Shi Lun. Guangxi Shi Fan da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  17. Zhaoguang Ge (2006). Xi Chao You Dong Feng: Wan Qing Min Chu Si Xiang, Zong Jiao Yu Xue Shu Shi Jiang. Shanghai Gu Ji Chu Ban She.
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  18. Bendong Gong (2009). Zhongguo Xian Dai Xue Shu Yan Jin: Cong Zhang Taiyan Dao Cheng Qianfan. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  19. Yousen He (2009). He Yousen Xian Sheng Xue Shu Lun Wen Ji. Guo Li Tai Wan da Xue Chu Ban Zhong Xin.
    Shang ce. Ru xue yu si xiang -- xia ce. Qing dai xue shu si chao.
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  20. Ludger Honnefelder (ed.) (2011). Albertus Magnus Und der Ursprung der Universitätsidee: Die Begegnung der Wissenschaftskulturen Im 13. Jahrhundert Und Die Entdeckung des Konzepts der Bildung Durch Wissenschaft. Berlin University Press.
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  21. Ludger Honnefelder (ed.) (2011). Albertus Magnus Und der Ursprung der Universitätsidee: Die Begegnung der Wissenschaftskulturen Im 13. Berlin University Press.
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  22. Qingzhang Lin (ed.) (2012). Zhongguo Xue Shu Si Xiang Yan Jiu Ji Kan. Hua Mulan Wen Hua Chu Ban She.
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  23. Zhongfeng Lu (2005). Lu Zhongfeng Wen Ji =. Shanghai Ci Shu Chu Ban She.
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  24. Zhitian Luo (2009). Jin Dai du Shu Ren de Si Xiang Shi Jie Yu Zhi Xue Qu Xiang. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  25. Martin Mulsow (2012). Prekäres Wissen: Eine Andere Ideengeschichte der Frühen Neuzeit. Suhrkamp.
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  26. Pu Pang (ed.) (2012). 20 Shi Ji Ru Xue Tong Zhi =. Zhejiang da Xue Chu Ban She.
    v. 1. Ji nian juan = Annals -- v. 2. Ji shi juan = Chronicles -- v. 3-4. Xue an juan = Academics.
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  27. Detlef Rohling (2012). Omne Scibile Est Discibile: Eine Untersuchung Zur Struktur Und Genese des Lehrens Und Lernens Bei Thomas von Aquin. Aschendorff Verlag.
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  28. Goldwin Albert Smith, J. H. Hexter & A. L. Rowse (1972). The Professor & the Public the Role of the Scholar in the Modern World.
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  29. Youguang Tu (2009). Tu Youguang Wen Cun =. Hua Zhong Ke Ji da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  30. Sumin Xu & Luming Shentu (eds.) (2009). Ming Qing Si Xiang Wen Hua Bian Qian. Nanjing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  31. Daobin Xu (2012). Wan Pai Xue Shu Yu Chuan Cheng =. Huang Shan Shu She.
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  32. Yong-ju Yi (2009). Tong Asia Kŭndae Sasangnon: "Chŏnt'ong" Ŭi Haesŏk Kwa Ch'angjo. Ihaksa.
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  33.  2
    Herman Paul (2011). Performing History: How Historical Scholarship is Shaped by Epistemic Virtues. History and Theory 50 (1):1-19.
    Philosophers of history in the past few decades have been predominantly interested in issues of explanation and narrative discourse. Consequently, they have focused consistently and almost exclusively on the historian’s output, thereby ignoring that historical scholarship is a practice of reading, thinking, discussing, and writing, in which successful performance requires active cultivation of certain skills, attitudes, and virtues. This paper, then, suggests a new agenda for philosophy of history. Inspired by a “performative turn” in the history (...)
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  34.  4
    John L. Taylor & Andrew Hunt (2014). History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Science in England. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 2045-2081.
    This chapter relates a broadly chronological story of the developments over the last 50 years that have sought to reshape the science curriculum in English schools by introducing aspects of the history of science and nature of science. The chapter highlights key curriculum projects by outlining the contexts in which they developed and summarising their rationales as set out in their publications. It also provides signposts to some of the reports of research and scholarship that (...)
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  35.  7
    Richard Wightman Fox & Robert B. Westbrook (eds.) (1998). In Face of the Facts: Moral Inquiry in American Scholarship. Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge.
    Recently there has been a renewed interest in moral inquiry among American scholars in a variety of disciplines. This collection of accessible essays by scholars in philosophy, political theory, psychology, history, literary studies, sociology, religious studies, anthropology, and legal studies affords a view of the current state of moral inquiry in the American academy, and it offers fresh departures for ethically informed, interdisciplinary scholarship. Seeking neither to reduce values to facts nor facts to values, these essays aim to (...)
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  36.  11
    Michalinos Zembylas (2013). Pedagogies of Hauntology in History Education: Learning to Live with the Ghosts of Disappeared Victims of War and Dictatorship. Educational Theory 63 (1):69-86.
    Michalinos Zembylas examines how history education can be reconceived in terms of Jacques Derrida's notion of “hauntology,” that is, as an ongoing conversation with the “ghost” — in the case of this essay, the ghosts of disappeared victims of war and dictatorship. Here, Zembylas uses hauntology as both metaphor and pedagogical methodology for deconstructing the orthodoxies of academic history thinking and learning about “the disappeared.” As metaphor, hauntology evokes the figure of the ghost in order both to (...)
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  37.  7
    Pádraig Hogan (1998). The Politics of Identity and the Experience of Learning: Insights for Pluralism From Western Educational History. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):251-259.
    The eight short explorations in the first part of this paper attempt to identify some crucial developments in the history of Western learning which eclipsed pluralist educational practices in their (Socratic) infancy and thereafter, and which contributed to the widespread employment of education as a force for cultural uniformity, or assumed superiority. Drawing together the lessons of the first part with contemporary insights from hermeneutic philosophy, the second part sets forth briefly the promising educational possibilities for human self-understanding (...)
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  38.  1
    Sven Ove Hansson (2001). Learning From History. Theoria 67 (1):1-3.
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  39.  13
    David Arnold (2010). Inquiry Learning: Making History Active. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 18 (2):20.
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  40.  6
    Steve Johnson (1998). Skills, Socrates and the Sophists: Learning From History. British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (2):201 - 213.
    The Sophists, and the Socratic response they provoked, are considered in order to elucidate issues raised by present-day skill-talk. These issues include: whether skills avoid questions of ends and truth; the existence of general skills, such as critical thinking; the importance of knowledge; skills and the personality; and some implications for teaching and philosophy.
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  41.  8
    David S. Owen (2005). Critical Theory and Learning From History. Radical Philosophy Review 8 (2):187-195.
    In this paper I utilize Martin Beck Matuštík’s intellectual biography of Habermas as a means for reflecting on the meaning that criticaltheory has for us in the wake of September 11. I argue that the significant contribution of Matuštík’s book is that it fruitfully continues theconversation about the meaning of critical theory by underscoring the sociohistorical contexts that frame Habermas’s intellectual engagements. Matuštík’s figure of the critical theorist as witness refocuses attention on the critical theorist in context, nevertheless as critical (...)
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  42. Derek L. Phillips (1995). Chapter 7. Learning From History. In Looking Backward: A Critical Appraisal of Communitarian Thought. Princeton University Press 149-174.
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  43.  1
    A. Hall (1969). Can the History of Science Be History? British Journal for the History of Science 4 (3):207-220.
    It was in the closing year of the nineteenth century that Paul Tannery organized at an international historical congress the first international meeting devoted to the history of science. If antiquity would make a scholarly subject respectable, scholarship in the history of science must be beyond reproach; still earlier than Tannery and his colleagues in many European countries were the German historian of chemistry Kopp, and William Whewell, Master of Trinity; the eighteenth century had produced substantial works (...)
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  44. Lisa Sarasohn (2002). Peiresc's Europe: Learning and Virtue in the Seventeenth Century. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:124-125.
    In his 1641 biography of Nicolaus‐Claude Fabri de Peiresc , Pierre Gassendi declared that all learned men acknowledged that the most noble Peiresc “had seized the glory of kings” . For Gassendi and his circle of savants, Peiresc, in his public life a member of the Parlement of Provence, was the pattern of beneficence and learning, heroic in his virtue, his magnificent mind, and his care for scholars and scholarship. Peter N. Miller, in his profound and riveting study (...)
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  45.  27
    Sara Green & Olaf Wolkenhauer (forthcoming). Tracing Organizing Principles-Learning From the History of Systems Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences.
    With the emergence of systems biology the notion of organizing principles is being highlighted as a key research aim. Researchers attempt to ‘reverse engineer’ the functional organization of biological systems using methodologies from mathematics, engineering and computer science while taking advantage of data produced by new experimental techniques. While systems biology is a relatively new approach, the quest for general principles of biological organization dates back to systems theoretic approaches in early and mid-20th century. The aim (...)
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  46.  8
    Robert M. Young (1966). Scholarship and the History of the Behavioural Sciences. History of Science 5 (1):1-51.
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  47.  25
    Daniel Garber (1986). Learning From the Past: Reflections on the Role of History in the Philosophy of Science. Synthese 67 (1):91 - 114.
    In recent years philosophers of science have turned away from positivist programs for explicating scientific rationality through detailed accounts of scientific procedure and turned toward large-scale accounts of scientific change. One important motivation for this was better fit with the history of science. Paying particular attention to the large-scale theories of Lakatos and Laudan I argue that the history of science is no better accommodated by the new large-scale theories than it was by the earlier positivist philosophies of (...)
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  48.  2
    Abdul Razaq Ahmad, Ahmad Ali Seman, Mohd Mahzan Awang & Fadzilah Sulaiman (2014). Application of Multiple Intelligence Theory to Increase Student Motivation in Learning History. Asian Culture and History 7 (1).
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  49.  7
    Knud Haakonssen (1985). Topica Universalis: A Model History of Humanist and Baroque Learning. Philosophy and History 18 (2):127-129.
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  50.  9
    C. Joachim Classen (1983). Roman History and the History of Scholarship on Rome. Vol. I. Philosophy and History 16 (2):155-156.
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