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  1. Lee Anne Peck (2011). Lessons in Developing a Personal Ethical Standard. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (4):331-333.
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  2. Stacy Elizabeth Stevenson & Lee Anne Peck (2011). “I Am Eating a Sandwich Now”: Intent and Foresight in the Twitter Age. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (1):56-65.
    Although the criteria of double effect is usually used with issues of warfare and human health, such as abortion and euthanasia, the authors suggest using T. A. Cavanaugh's version of double effect reasoning when deliberating about cases that deal with the social media. With the creation of a modified version of Cavanaugh's three criteria, both social media users and those who evaluate decisions in that medium will have an alternate ethical decision-making model to use. The authors show how one might (...)
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  3. Lee Anne Peck & Nancy J. Matchett (2010). An Online Ethics Training Module for Public Relations Professionals. Public Relations Journal 4 (4).
    Researchers developed and tested an online training module with both experienced public relations professionals and newcomers to the field with the hopes of helping them sharpen and refine their ethical decision-making skills. The study found that although most testers reported the Web site was difficult to navigate and/or found the ethical content to be complex, the majority believed their ethical decision-making abilities were improved.
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  4. Lee Anne Peck (2007). Flack and Hacks: Transparency and Trust in the UK. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 22 (2 & 3):231 – 235.
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  5. Lee Anne Peck (2007). Sapere Aude! The Importance of a Moral Education in Kant's Doctrine of Virtue. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 22 (2 & 3):208 – 214.
    The misunderstanding of philosopher Immanuel Kant's principle of morality - the categorical imperative - by journalism professionals, professors, and students comes in many forms. To better understand Kant's ethical theory, however, one must go beyond Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals and study his Doctrine of Virtue: Part 2 of The Metaphysics of Morals; to apply the categorical imperative, one must also understand the importance Kant placed on moral education.
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  6. Richard M. Dubiel, Lawrence Souder, Lee Anne Peck, James M. Haney, Muriel R. Friedman & Ian Marquand (2004). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):307 – 320.
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  7. Kris Bunton, Lee Anne Peck & Deni Elliott (2003). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (2):143 – 151.
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  8. Lee Anne Peck (2003). [Book Review] Reporting on Human Rights: A Fresh Debate? [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (2):146-149.
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  9. Lee Anne Peck (2003). Socrates in Jail: The Importance of Independence and Responsibility. In Howard Good (ed.), Desperately Seeking Ethics: A Guide to Media Conduct. Scarecrow Press.
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