Search results for 'Lee Blackburn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lee Blackburn (2010). Aquinas the Augustinian. Augustinian Studies 41 (2):475-479.score: 240.0
  2. Lee Blackburn (2009). Augustine of Hippo. Augustinian Studies 40 (2):320-322.score: 240.0
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  3. Simon Blackburn (2008). Interview - Simon Blackburn. The Philosophers' Magazine 40 (40):38-39.score: 210.0
    Cambridge professor Simon Blackburn is best known to the general public as the author of several books of popular philosophy such as  ink, Being Good andTruth: a Guide for the Perplexed. Academic philosophers also know him as the author of one of the most important books of contemporary moral philosophy, Ruling Passions, and as a former editor of the leading journal Mind.
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  4. Laura Ling & Euna Lee (2010). Ling and Lee's Open Letter. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (1):72-76.score: 180.0
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  5. Patrick Lee (2008). Lee's Rejoinder to Mercier's Reply. The Monist 91 (3/4):442-445.score: 180.0
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  6. Elizabeth Lee (2010). Helen Lee: The Gift. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 14 (2 & 3):345-346.score: 180.0
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  7. T. Baldwin, F. Jackson, S. Svavarsdottir & S. Blackburn (2001). BLACKBURN, S.-Ruling Passions. Philosophical Books 42 (1):1-32.score: 180.0
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  8. Patrick Blackburn & Maarten Marx Hybrid Logic (2001). Characterization, Interpolation and Complexity, by Carlos Areces, Patrick Blackburn and Maarten Marx. Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (3):977-1010.score: 180.0
     
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  9. Jonathan Lee (2007). Frantz Grenet*, Jonathan Lee, Philippe Martinez* & François Ory. Proceedings of the British Academy 133:243-267.score: 180.0
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  10. Jaeho Lee (2011). Genuine Counterexamples to the Simple Conditional Analysis of Disposition: A Reply to Choi. Philosophia 39 (2):327-334.score: 120.0
    Choi (Philosophia, 38(3), 2010) argues that my counterexamples in Lee (Philosophia, 38(3), 2010) to the simple conditional analysis of disposition ascription are bogus counterexamples. In this paper, I argue that Choi’s arguments are not satisfactory and that my examples are genuine counterexamples.
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  11. Jung H. Lee (2013). The Rhetoric Of Context. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (4):555-584.score: 90.0
    This paper presents a critical appraisal of the recent turn in comparative religious ethics to virtue theory; it argues that the specific aspirations of virtue ethicists to make ethics more contextual, interdisciplinary, and practice-centered has in large measure failed to match the rhetoric. I suggest that the focus on the category of the human and practices associated with self-formation along with a methodology grounded in “analogical imagination” has actually poeticized the subject matter into highly abstract textual studies on normative voices (...)
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  12. Philip R. Lee (ed.) (1976/1977). Symposium On Consciousness, Presented At The Annual Meeting Of The American Association For The Advancement Of Science, 1974. Viking Press.score: 90.0
  13. Simon Blackburn (1993). Essays in Quasi-Realism. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This volume collects some influential essays in which Simon Blackburn, one of our leading philosophers, explores one of the most profound and fertile of philosophical problems: the way in which our judgments relate to the world. This debate has centered on realism, or the view that what we say is validated by the way things stand in the world, and a variety of oppositions to it. Prominent among the latter are expressive and projective theories, but also a relaxed pluralism (...)
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  14. Simon Blackburn (1998/2000). Ruling Passions. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Simon Blackburn puts forward a compelling and original philosophy of human motivation and morality. Why do we behave as we do? Can we improve? Is our ethics at war with our passions, or is it an upshot of those passions? Blackburn seeks the answers to such questions in an exploration of the nature of moral emotions and the structures of human motivation. He develops a naturalistic ethics, which integrates our understanding of ethics with the rest of our understanding (...)
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  15. Simon Blackburn (1999). Think: A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Here at last is a coherent, unintimidating introduction to the challenging and fascinating landscape of Western philosophy. Written expressly for "anyone who believes there are big questions out there, but does not know how to approach them," Think provides a sound framework for exploring the most basic themes of philosophy, and for understanding how major philosophers have tackled the questions that have pressed themselves most forcefully on human consciousness. Simon Blackburn, author of the best-selling Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, begins (...)
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  16. Simon Blackburn (2008). Swinburne on Religion and Ethics. Think 7 (20):17-21.score: 60.0
    Simon Blackburn responds to the preceding article by Richard Swinburne.
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  17. Mi-Kyoung Lee (2005). Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Relativism, the position that things are for each as they seem to each, was first formulated in Western philosophy by Protagoras, the 5th century BC Greek orator and teacher. Mi-Kyoung Lee focuses on the challenge to the possibility of expert knowledge posed by Protagoras, together with responses by the three most important philosophers of the next generation, Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus. In his book Truth, Protagoras made vivid use of two provocative but imperfectly spelled out ideas: first, that we are (...)
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  18. Simon Blackburn (2001/2003). Ethics: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this clear introduction to ethics Simon Blackburn tackles the major moral questions surrounding birth, death, happiness, desire and freedom, showing us how ...
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  19. Sukjae Lee (1998). Scotus on the Will: The Rational Power and the Dual Affections. Vivarium 36 (1):40-54.score: 60.0
    Sukjae Lee John Duns Scotus believes it to be undeniably true that we human beings have free will. He does not argue for our freedom but rather explains it. There are two elements which are both characteristic of and essential to Scotus’ account of human will: namely, 1) the will as a self-determining power for opposites, thus a ‘rational’ power; and 2) the ‘dual affections of the will.’2 The significance of each element taken separately is comprehensible if not obvious. We (...)
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  20. Simon Blackburn (1973). Reason and Prediction. London,Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    An original study of the philosophical problems associated with inductive reasoning. Like most of the main questions in epistemology, the classical problem of induction arises from doubts about a mode of inference used to justify some of our most familiar and pervasive beliefs. The experience of each individual is limited and fragmentary, yet the scope of our beliefs is much wider; and it is the relation between belief and experience, in particular the belief that the future will in some respects (...)
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  21. Theresa Man Ling Lee (2007). Rethinking the Personal and the Political: Feminist Activism and Civic Engagement. Hypatia 22 (4):163-179.score: 60.0
    : The slogan "the personal is political" captures the distinctive challenge to the public-private divide posed by contemporary feminists. As such, feminist activism is not necessarily congruent with civic engagement, which is predicated on the paradoxical need to both bridge and sustain the public-private divide. Lee argues that rather than subverting the divide, the politics of the personal offers an alternative understanding of civic engagement that aims to reinstate individuals' dignity and agency.
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  22. Jae Seong Lee (2008). Contributing to the Development of Postmodern Critical Theory with Eastern Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 26:69-75.score: 60.0
    This paper concerns broadly with the works of such ethical postmodern theorists as Jacques Derrida, Emmanuel Levinas, Giles Deleuze, focusing on how we can contribute to the development of their ideas by discussing Laozi and Zhuanzi’s Taoism, Buddhism, and modern Korean Neo-Confucianism of Toe-gae Lee. I claim that for criticism and art, literature, film and culture as well as philosophy itself, we are now facing this new need of another notion of subjectivity that not only accepts difference but takes the (...)
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  23. Steven Lee (2012). Ethics and War: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    What are the ethical principles underpinning the idea of a just war and how should they be adapted to changing social and military circumstances? In this book, Steven P. Lee presents the basic principles of just war theory, showing how they evolved historically and how they are applied today in global relations. He examines the role of state sovereignty and individual human rights in the moral foundations of just war theory and discusses a wide range of topics including humanitarian intervention, (...)
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  24. Simon Blackburn (2005). Truth: A Guide. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis--an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"--the age-old war over truth. The front lines (...)
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  25. Simon Blackburn (2002). Being Good: A Short Introduction to Ethics. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    It is not only in our dark hours that scepticism, relativism, hypocrisy, and nihilism dog ethics. Whether it is a matter of giving to charity, or sticking to duty, or insisting on our rights, we can be confused, or be paralysed by the fear that our principles are groundless. Many are afraid that in a Godless world science has unmasked us as creatures fated by our genes to be selfish and tribalistic, or competitive and aggressive. Simon Blackburn, author of (...)
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  26. Edward Willatt & Matt Lee (eds.) (2009). Thinking Between Deleuze and Kant: A Strange Encounter. Continuum.score: 60.0
    In the wake of much previous work on Gilles Deleuze's relations to other thinkers (including Bergson, Spinoza and Leibniz), his relation to Kant is now of great and active interest and a thriving area of research. In the context of the wider debate between 'naturalism' and 'transcendental philosophy', the implicit dispute between Deleuze's 'transcendental empiricism' and Kant's 'transcendental idealism' is of prime philosophical concern. -/- Bringing together the work of international experts from both Deleuze scholarship and Kant scholarship, Thinking Between (...)
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  27. Eyun-Jung Ki, Junghyuk Lee & Hong-Lim Choi (2012). Factors Affecting Ethical Practice of Public Relations Professionals Within Public Relations Firms. Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (2):123 - 141.score: 60.0
    Abstract This study was designed to investigate the factors affecting ethical practices of public relations professionals in public relations firms. In particular, the following organizational ethics factors were examined: (1) presence of ethics code, (2) top management support for ethical practice, (3) ethical climate, and (4) perception of the association between career success and ethical practice. Analysis revealed that the presence of an ethics code along with top management support and a non-egoistic ethical climate within public relations firms significantly influenced (...)
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  28. Maurice S. Lee (2005). Slavery, Philosophy, and American Literature, 1830-1860. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Examining the literature of slavery and race before the Civil War, Maurice Lee demonstrates for the first time exactly how the slavery crisis became a crisis of philosophy that exposed the breakdown of national consensus and the limits of rational authority. Poe, Stowe, Douglass, Melville, and Emerson were among the antebellum authors who tried - and failed - to find rational solutions to the slavery conflict. Unable to mediate the slavery controversy as the nation moved toward war, their writings (...)
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  29. Simon Blackburn (2004). Lust: The Seven Deadly Sins. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Lust, says Simon Blackburn, is furtive, headlong, always sizing up opportunities. It is a trail of clothing in the hallway, the trashy cousin of love. But be that as it may, the aim of this delightful book is to rescue lust "from the denunciations of old men of the deserts, to deliver it from the pallid and envious confessor and the stocks and pillories of the Puritans, to drag it from the category of sin to that of virtue." (...), author of such popular philosophy books as Think and Being Good, here offers a sharp-edged probe into the heart of lust, blending together insight from some of the world's greatest thinkers on sex, human nature, and our common cultural foibles. Blackburn takes a wide ranging, historical approach, discussing lust as viewed by Aristophanes and Plato, lust in the light of the Stoic mistrust of emotion, and the Christian fear of the flesh that catapulted lust to the level of deadly sin. He describes how philosophical pessimists like Schopenhauer and Sartre contributed to our thinking about lust and explores the false starts in understanding lust represented by Freud, Kinsey, and modern "evolutionary psychology." But most important, Blackburn reminds us that lust is also life-affirming, invigorating, fun. He points to the work of David Hume (Blackburn's favorite philosopher) who saw lust not only as a sensual delight but also "a joy of the mind." Written by one of the most eminent living philosophers, attractively illustrated and colourfully packaged, Lust is a book that anyone would lust over. (shrink)
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  30. Hangjun Lee & Chulki Hong (2012). The Cracked Share. Continent 2 (1):2-5.score: 60.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 2–5 To begin with, as we understand from a remote place like Seoul, there have been two different conceptions of materiality in the Western experimental ?lm history: materiality of cinema and of ?lm. The former has been represented by the practitioners of the so-called the “Expanded Cinema” and the latter by the tradition of the “Hand-made” ?lm. Whereas for the Expanded Cinema, the materiality or the “medium-speci?city” includes not only the ?lm material but also the entire condition (...)
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  31. Carlos Areces, Patrick Blackburn, Antonia Huertas & María Manzano (2012). Hybrid Type Theory: A Quartet in Four Movements. Principia 15 (2):225.score: 60.0
    Este artigo canta uma canção — uma canção criada ao unir o trabalho de quatro grandes nomes na história da lógica: Hans Reichenbach, Arthur Prior, Richard Montague, e Leon Henkin. Embora a obra dos primeiros três desses autores tenha sido previamente combinada, acrescentar as ideias de Leon Henkin é o acréscimo requerido para fazer com que essa combinação funcione no nível lógico. Mas o presente trabalho não se concentra nas tecnicalidades subjacentes (que podem ser encontradas em Areces, Blackburn, Huertas, (...)
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  32. Don Ravenzwaaij, Chris P. Moore, Michael D. Lee & Ben R. Newell (2014). A Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling Approach to Searching and Stopping in Multi‐Attribute Judgment. Cognitive Science 38 (2).score: 60.0
    In most decision-making situations, there is a plethora of information potentially available to people. Deciding what information to gather and what to ignore is no small feat. How do decision makers determine in what sequence to collect information and when to stop? In two experiments, we administered a version of the German cities task developed by Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996), in which participants had to decide which of two cities had the larger population. Decision makers were not provided with the (...)
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  33. Simon Blackburn (2006/2007). Plato's Republic: A Biography. Atlantic Monthly Press.score: 60.0
    Plato is perhaps the most significant philosopher who has ever lived and The Republic , composed in Athens in about 375 BC, is widely regarded as his most famous dialogue. Its discussion of the perfect city — and the perfect mind — laid the foundations for Western culture and, for over two thousand years, has been the cornerstone of Western philosophy. As the distinguished Cambridge professor Simon Blackburn points out, it has probably sustained more commentary, and been subject to (...)
     
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  34. Simon Blackburn (2001). Being Good: An Introduction to Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    From political scandals at the highest levels to inflated repair bills at the local garage, we are seemingly surrounded with unethical behavior, so why should we behave any differently? Why should we go through life anchored down by rules no one else seems to follow? Writing with wit and elegance, Simon Blackburn tackles such questions in this lively look at ethics, highlighting the complications and doubts and troubling issues that spring from the very simple question of how we ought (...)
     
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  35. Vicki L. Lee (1988). Beyond Behaviorism. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 60.0
    Beyond Behaviorism explores and contrasts means and ends psychology with conventional psychology -- that of stimuli and response. The author develops this comparison by exploring the general nature of psychological phenomena and clarifying many persistent doubts about psychology. Dr. Lee contrasts conventional psychology (stimuli and responses) involving reductionistic, organocentric, and mechanistic metatheory with alternative psychology (means and ends) that is autonomous, contextual, and evolutionary.
     
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  36. Simon Lee (1986). Law and Morals: Warnock, Gillick, and Beyond. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    An examination of the relationship between law and morals, this wide-ranging book develops themes addressed by Hart and Devlin, relating them to issues and events of current interest. Lee covers such timely concerns as: the Moral Majority; embryo experiments and surrogate motherhood; contraception, children's rights, and parents' rights; informed medical consent; equality and discrimination; and freedom of expression and pornography. Stressing the relevance of these issues to the lives of all of us, Lee argues for broader participation in debate on (...)
     
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  37. Hsin-wen Lee (2012). The Identity Argument for National Self-Determination. Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (2):123-139.score: 60.0
    http://paq.press.illinois.edu/26/2/lee.html A number of philosophers argue that the moral value of national identity is sufficient to justify at least a prima facie right of a national community to create its own independent, sovereign state. In the literature, this argument is commonly referred to as the identity argument. In this paper, I consider whether the identity argument successfully proves that a national group is entitled to a state of its own. To do so, I first explain three important steps in the (...)
     
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  38. Keekok Lee (2005). Zoos: A Philosophical Tour. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    In this book, Keekok Lee asks the question, "what is an animal, and how does our treatment of it within captivity affect its status as a being ?" This ontological treatment marks the first such approach in looking at animals in captivity. Engaging with the moral questions of zoo-keeping (is it morally justified to keep a wild animal in captivity?) as well as the ontological (what is it that we conserve in zoos after all? A wild animal or its shadow?), (...)
     
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  39. Varol Akman & Patrick Blackburn (2000). Editorial: Alan Turing and Artificial Intelligence. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 9 (4):391-395.score: 30.0
    Department of Computer Engineering, Bilkent University, 06533 Ankara, Turkey E-mail: akman@cs.bilkent.edu.tr; http://www.cs.bilkent.edu.tr/?akman..
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  40. Seonghwa Lee (2001). Transversal-Universals in Discourse Ethics: Towards a Reconcilable Ethics Between Universalism and Communitarianism. [REVIEW] Human Studies 24 (1/2):45-56.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses the possibility of an ethics of difference. It begins with an introduction to current poststructural and critical theories in order to show their significance for transcultural politics and ethics. Its theme is formulated in terms of the debate between the affirmation of ethical cognitivism cast in the form of universalism and the advocacy of moral skepticism in the mode of communitarianism. Distancing itself from the idea of universal morality, this paper attempts to respond to the challenge of (...)
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  41. Geoffrey Lee (2007). Consciousness in a Space-Time World. Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):341–374.score: 30.0
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  42. Simon W. Blackburn (1984). The Individual Strikes Back. Synthese 58 (March):281-302.score: 30.0
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  43. Simon W. Blackburn (1990). Filling in Space. Analysis 50 (2):62-5.score: 30.0
  44. Simon Blackburn, Human Reasons.score: 30.0
    In this paper I contemplate two phenomena that have impressed theorists concerned with the domain of reasons and of normativity. One is the much-discussed ‘externality’ of reasons. Reasons are just there, anyway. They exist whether or not agents take any notice of them. They do not only exist in the light of contingent desires or mere inclinations. They are ‘external’ not ‘internal’. They bear on us, even when through ignorance or wickedness we take no notice of them. They thus very (...)
     
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  45. Simon Blackburn (1999). Is Objective Moral Justification Possible on a Quasi-Realist Foundation? Inquiry 42 (2):213 – 227.score: 30.0
    This essay juxtaposes the position in metaethics defended, expressivism with quasirealistic trimmings, with the ancient problem of relativism. It argues that, perhaps surprisingly, there is less of a problem of normative truth on this approach than on others. Because ethics is not in the business of representing aspects of the world, there is no way to argue for a plurality of moral truths, simply from the existence of a plurality of moral opinions. The essay also argues that other approaches, which (...)
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  46. Simon Blackburn (2009). Truth and A Priori Possibility: Egan's Charge Against Quasi-Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):201-213.score: 30.0
    In this journal Andy Egan argued that, contrary to what I have claimed, quasi-realism is committed to a damaging asymmetry between the way a subject regards himself and the way he regards others. In particular, a subject must believe it to be a priori that if something is one of his stable or fundamental beliefs, then it is true. Whereas he will not hold that this is a priori true of other people. In this paper I rebut Egan's argument, and (...)
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  47. Sukjae Lee (2008). Necessary Connections and Continuous Creation: Malebranche's Two Arguments for Occasionalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):539-565.score: 30.0
    Malebranche presents two major arguments for occasionalism: the “no necessary connection” argument (NNC) and the “conservation is but continuous creation” argument (CCC). NNC appears prominently in his Search After Truth but virtually disappears and surrenders the spotlight to CCC in his later major work, Dialogues on Metaphysics and on Religion . This paper investigates the possible reasons and motivations behind this significant shift. I argue that the shift is no surprise if we consider the two ways in which the CCC (...)
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  48. Simon Blackburn (1990). Hume and Thick Connexions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:237-250.score: 30.0
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  49. John Haldane & Patrick Lee (2003). Aquinas on Human Ensoulment, Abortion and the Value of Life. Philosophy 78 (2):255-278.score: 30.0
    Although there is a significant number of books and essays in which Aquinas's thought is examined in some detail, there are still many aspects of his writings that remain unknown to those outside the field of Thomistic studies; or which are generally misunderstood. An example is Aquinas's account of the origins of individual human life. This is the subject of a chapter in a recent book by Robert Pasnau on Thomas Aquinas on Human Nature (Cambridge: CUP, 2001). Since there will (...)
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