Search results for 'Legal Personhood' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lawrence B. Solum (1992). Legal Personhood for Artificial Intelligences. North Carolina Law Review 70:1231.score: 180.0
    Could an artificial intelligence become a legal person? As of today, this question is only theoretical. No existing computer program currently possesses the sort of capacities that would justify serious judicial inquiry into the question of legal personhood. The question is nonetheless of some interest. Cognitive science begins with the assumption that the nature of human intelligence is computational, and therefore, that the human mind can, in principle, be modelled as a program that runs on a computer. (...)
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  2. E. Christian Brugger (2009). “Other Selves”: Moral and Legal Proposals Regarding the Personhood of Cryopreserved Human Embryos. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):105-129.score: 108.0
    This essay has two purposes. The first is to argue that our moral duties towards human embryos should be assessed in light of the Golden Rule by asking the normative question, “how would I want to be treated if I were an embryo?” Some reject the proposition “I was an embryo” on the basis that embryos should not be recognized as persons. This essay replies to five common arguments denying the personhood of human embryos: (1) that early human embryos (...)
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  3. Paul Groarke (2010). The Persons Case: The Origins and Legacy of the Fight for Legal Personhood. By Robert J. Sharpe and Patricia I. McMahon. Heythrop Journal 51 (2):361-362.score: 90.0
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  4. Jonathan Will, Eli Y. Adashi & I. Glenn Cohen (2013). When Potential Does Not Matter: What Developments in Cellular Biology Tell Us About the Concept of Legal Personhood. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):38-40.score: 90.0
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  5. Richard Von Glahn (2012). Part I: Registration, States and Legal Personhood-1 Household Registration, Property Rights, and Social Obligations in Imperial China: Principles and Practices. Proceedings of the British Academy 182:39.score: 90.0
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  6. Claire Thomas (1980). Potential for Personhood: A Measure of Life the Severely Defective Newborn, Legal Implications of a Social-Medical Dilemma. [REVIEW] Bioethics Quarterly 2 (3):164-193.score: 78.0
    This paper asks for legislation that will remove criminal sanctions from good faith decisions by parents and physicians to allow severely defective newborns to die. In so doing it attempts to bring to satisfactory resolution conflicting points of view in the disciplines of moral philosophy, medicine, and law. This paper argues that euthanasia of severely defective newborns is morally justifiable and legally permissible within reasonable extensions of current interpretations of the Federal Constitution by the Supreme Court. It describes the medical (...)
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  7. Linda MacDonald Glenn (2003). A Legal Perspective on Humanity, Personhood, and Species Boundaries. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):27 – 28.score: 72.0
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  8. Kristin Savell (2011). Confronting Death in Legal Disputes About Treatment-Limitation in Children. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):363-377.score: 72.0
    Most legal analyses of selective nontreatment of seriously ill children centre on the question of whether it is in a child’s best interests to be kept alive in the face of extreme suffering and/or an intolerable quality of life. Courts have resisted any direct confrontation with the question of whether the child’s death is in his or her best interests. Nevertheless, representations of death may have an important role to play in this field of jurisprudence. The prevailing philosophy is (...)
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  9. Gary Francione (1993). Personhood, Property and Legal Competence. In Peter Singer & Paola Cavalieri (eds.), The Great Ape Project. St. Martin's Griffin. 252.score: 72.0
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  10. Mary Lyn Stoll (2005). Corporate Rights to Free Speech? Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):261 - 269.score: 66.0
    . Although the courts have ruled that companies are legal persons, they have not yet made clear the extent to which political free speech for corporations is limited by the strictures legitimately placed upon corporate commercial speech. I explore the question of whether or not companies can properly be said to have the right to civil free speech or whether corporate speech is always de facto commercial speech not subject to the same sorts of legal protections as is (...)
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  11. Niels van Dijk (2010). Property, Privacy and Personhood in a World of Ambient Intelligence. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):57-69.score: 54.0
    Profiling technologies are the facilitating force behind the vision of Ambient Intelligence in which everyday devices are connected and embedded with all kinds of smart characteristics enabling them to take decisions in order to serve our preferences without us being aware of it. These technological practices have considerable impact on the process by which our personhood takes shape and pose threats like discrimination and normalisation. The legal response to these developments should move away from a focus on entitlements (...)
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  12. Mohammed Ghaly (2012). The Beginning of Human Life: Islamic Bioethical Perspectives. Zygon 47 (1):175-213.score: 54.0
    Abstract. In January 1985, about 80 Muslim religious scholars and biomedical scientists gathered in a symposium held in Kuwait to discuss the broad question “When does human life begin?” This article argues that this symposium is one of the milestones in the field of contemporary Islamic bioethics and independent legal reasoning (Ijtihād). The proceedings of the symposium, however, escaped the attention of academic researchers. This article is meant to fill in this research lacuna by analyzing the proceedings of this (...)
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  13. Sirkku Kristiina Hellsten (2000). Towards an Alternative Approach to Personhood in the End of Life Questions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (6):515-536.score: 54.0
    Within the Western bioethical framework, we make adistinction between two dominant interpretations of the meaning of moral personhood: thenaturalist and the humanist one. While both interpretations of moral personhood claim topromote individual autonomy and rights, they end up with very different normativeviews on the practical and legal measures needed to realize these values in every daylife. Particularly when we talk about the end of life issues it appears that in general thearguments for euthanasia are drawn from the (...)
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  14. Niels Dijk (2010). Property, Privacy and Personhood in a World of Ambient Intelligence. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):57-69.score: 54.0
    Profiling technologies are the facilitating force behind the vision of Ambient Intelligence in which everyday devices are connected and embedded with all kinds of smart characteristics enabling them to take decisions in order to serve our preferences without us being aware of it. These technological practices have considerable impact on the process by which our personhood takes shape and pose threats like discrimination and normalisation. The legal response to these developments should move away from a focus on entitlements (...)
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  15. Francisco Andrade, Paulo Novais, José Machado & José Neves (2007). Contracting Agents: Legal Personality and Representation. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 15 (4):357-373.score: 48.0
    The combined use of computers and telecommunications and the latest evolution in the field of Artificial Intelligence brought along new ways of contracting and of expressing will and declarations. The question is, how far we can go in considering computer intelligence and autonomy, how can we legally deal with a new form of electronic behaviour capable of autonomous action? In the field of contracting, through Intelligent Electronic Agents, there is an imperious need of analysing the question of expression of consent, (...)
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  16. Jeffrey Nesteruk & David T. Risser (1992). Teaching Ethics in Business Law Courses. In Joshua Laverson (ed.), Teaching Resource Bulletin, no. 2. American Bar Association (Commission on College and University Nonprofessional Legal Studies).score: 48.0
    The article begins with a view of recent developments in the discipline of business law. A model useful in the study of business ethics is presented. Business ethics is the philosophical examination of the body of values and conceptions that influence business decision making as well as being pervasive components of the social environment in which businesses operate. Our model is a four-part framework for approaching business ethics which is sensitive to its implications for business law. The model's four parts (...)
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  17. F. S. Jaffe (1978). Is Abortion a Religious Issue? 2. Enacting Religious Beliefs in a Pluralistic Society. Hastings Center Report 8 (4):14-16.score: 48.0
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  18. David J. Nixon (2012). Should UK Law Reconsider the Initial Threshold of Legal Personality?: A Critical Analysis. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (2):182-217.score: 42.0
    At present UK Law states that the unborn child only becomes a legal person invested with legal rights and full protections, like other human persons, at birth. This article critiques the present legal position of setting the threshold for legal personality at birth, showing its inconsistencies and fundamentally pragmatic basis. Against this background, it is argued that a principled approach towards unborn life is necessary, which reflects in law the reality that the unborn child is a (...)
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  19. Lars Reuter (2000). Human is What is Born of a Human: Personhood, Rationality, and an European Convention. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):181 – 194.score: 42.0
    In the course of its preparation, the 1997 convention on human rights and biomedicine adopted by the Council of Europe instigated a widespread debate. This article examines one of the core issues: the notion of the human being as depicted in the convention. It is argued that according to the convention, this being may exist in three different legal categories, namely 'human life', 'embryo', and 'personhood', each furnished with an inherent set of somewhat different rights, yet none of (...)
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  20. Martin Kusch (forthcoming). The Metaphysics and Politics of Corporate Personhood. Erkenntnis:1-14.score: 42.0
    This paper consists of brief critical comments on Chapter 8, “Personifying Group Agents”, of Christian List’s and Philip Pettit’s book Group Agency (2011). A first set of objections concerns the chapter’s history of ideas. List and Pettit present the history of the idea of corporate personhood as divided between “intrinsicist” and “performative” conceptions. I argue that this distinction does not fit with the historical record and that it makes important political and legal divides and battles invisible. A second (...)
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  21. Timothy J. Reiss (2003). Mirages of the Selfe: Patterns of Personhood in Ancient and Early Modern Europe. Stanford University Press.score: 42.0
    Through extensive readings in philosophical, legal, medical, and imaginative writing, this book explores notions and experiences of being a person from European antiquity to Descartes. It offers quite new interpretations of what it was to be a person—to experience who-ness—in other times and places, involving new understandings of knowing, willing, and acting, as well as of political and material life, the play of public and private, passions and emotions. The trajectory the author reveals reaches from the ancient sense of (...)
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  22. Michael H. Shapiro (2005). The Identity of Identity: Moral and Legal Aspects of Technological Self-Transformation. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):308-373.score: 42.0
    Technologies are being developed for significantly altering the traits of existing persons (or fetuses or embryos) and of future persons via germ line modification. The availability of such technologies may affect our philosophical, legal, and everyday understandings of several important concepts, including that of personal identity. I consider whether the idea of personal identity requires reconstruction, revision or abandonment in the face of such possibilities of technological intervention into the nature and form of an individual's attributes. This requires an (...)
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  23. L. J. (2001). Ideologies of Discrimination: Personhood and the 'Genetic Group'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (4):705-721.score: 42.0
    'Ideologies of Discrimination' considers the implications of the new genetics for understandings of personhood and for understandings of the relationship between people in groups. In particular, the essay delineates and examines the emerging notion of a 'genetic group' and considers the social implications of redefining families, racial groups and ethnic groups through express, and often exclusive, reference to a shared genome. One consequence of such redefinition has been the justification and elaboration of stigmatizing images of and discrimination against such (...)
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  24. Robert Audi (1997). Preventing Abortion as a Test Case for the Justifiability of Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):141-163.score: 36.0
    This paper explores the rationale for violence and coercion aimed at preventing abortion conceived as the killing of an innocent person. Some important arguments for personhood at conception are examined, and in the light of the examination the paper considers whether they warrant concluding that a free and democratic society should pass laws recognizing personhood at conception. The wider concern is what principles such a society should use as a basis for legal coercion and what principles conscientious (...)
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  25. Faisal Qazi, Joshua C. Ewell, Ayla Munawar, Usman Asrar & Nadir Khan (2013). The Degree of Certainty in Brain Death: Probability in Clinical and Islamic Legal Discourse. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):117-131.score: 36.0
    The University of Michigan conference “Where Religion, Policy, and Bioethics Meet: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Islamic Bioethics and End-of-Life Care” in April 2011 addressed the issue of brain death as the prototype for a discourse that would reflect the emergence of Islamic bioethics as a formal field of study. In considering the issue of brain death, various Muslim legal experts have raised concerns over the lack of certainty in the scientific criteria as applied to the definition and diagnosis of (...)
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  26. Kevin Gibson (2011). Toward an Intermediate Position on Corporate Moral Personhood. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):71-81.score: 36.0
    Models of moral responsibility rely on foundational views about moral agency. Many scholars believe that only humans can be moral agents, and therefore business needs to create models that foster greater receptivity to others through ethical dialog. This view leads to a difficulty if no specific person is the sole causal agent for an act, or if something comes about through aggregated action in a corporate setting. An alternate approach suggests that corporations are moral agents sufficiently like humans to be (...)
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  27. Marie Fox (2000). Pre-Persons, Commodities or Cyborgs: The Legal Construction and Representation of the Embryo. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (2):171-188.score: 36.0
    This paper explores how embryos have been representedin law. It argues that two main models haveunderpinned legal discourse concerning the embryo. Onediscourse, which has become increasingly prevalent,views embryos as legal subjects or persons. Suchrepresentations are facilitated by technologicaldevelopments such as ultrasound imaging. In additionto influencing Parliamentary debate prior to thepassage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act1990, images of embryos as persons featureprominently in popular culture, including advertisingand films, and this discourse came to the fore in the`orphaned embryo' (...)
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  28. Bruce Jennings (2009). Agency and Moral Relationship in Dementia. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):425-437.score: 36.0
    This essay examines the goals of care and the exercise of guardianship authority in the long-term care of persons with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of chronic, progressive dementia. It counters philosophical views that deny both agency and personhood to individuals with Alzheimer's on definitional or analytic conceptual grounds. It develops a specific conception of the quality of life and offers a critique of hedonic conceptions of quality of life and models of guardianship that are based on a hedonic (...)
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  29. Tom Koch & Mark Ridgley (1998). Distanced Perspectives: Aids, Anencephaly, and Ahp. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):47-58.score: 36.0
    US court decisions guaranteeing life-sustaining care to anencephalic infants have been viewed with disfavor, and sometimes disbelief, by some ethicists who do not believe in the necessity of life-sustaining support for those without cognitive abilities or an independently sustainable future. The distance between these two views – one legal and inclusive, the other medical and specific – seems unbridgeable. This paper reports on a program using multicriterion decision making to define and describe persons in a way which both acknowledges (...)
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  30. Robert A. Miller (2002). The Frankenstein Syndrome: The Creation of Mega-Media Conglomerates and Ethical Modeling in Journalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):105 - 110.score: 30.0
    Aristotle saw ethics as a habit that is modeled and developed though practice. Shelly's Victor Frankenstein, though well intentioned in his goals, failed to model ethical behavior for his creation, abandoning it to its own recourse. Today we live in an era of unfettered mergers and acquisitions where once separate and independent media increasingly are concentrated under the control and leadership of the fictitious but legal personhood of a few conglomerated corporations. This paper will explore the impact of (...)
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  31. Janice Richardson, Selves, Persons, Individuals : A Feminist Critique of the Law of Obligations.score: 30.0
    This thesis examines some of the contested meanings of what it is to be a self, person and individual. The law of obligations sets the context for this examination. One of the important aspects of contemporary feminist philosophy has been its move beyond highlighting inconsistencies in political and legal theory, in which theoretical frameworks can be shown to rely upon an ambiguous treatment of women. The feminist theorists whose work is considered use these theoretical weaknesses as a point of (...)
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  32. Sundari Anitha & Aisha Gill (2009). Coercion, Consent and the Forced Marriage Debate in the UK. Feminist Legal Studies 17 (2):165-184.score: 30.0
    An examination of case law on forced marriage reveals that in addition to physical force, the role of emotional pressure is now taken into consideration. However, in both legal and policy discourse, the difference between arranged and forced marriage continues to be framed in binary terms and hinges on the concept of consent: the context in which consent is constructed largely remains unexplored. By examining the socio-cultural construction of personhood, especially womanhood, and the intersecting structural inequalities that constrain (...)
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  33. F. M. Kamm (1992). Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Based on a non-consequentialist ethical theory, this book critically examines the prevalent view that if a fetus has the moral standing of a person, it has a right to life and abortion is impermissible. Most discussion of abortion has assumed that this view is correct, and so has focused on the question of the personhood of the fetus. Kamm begins by considering in detail the permissibility of killing in non-abortion cases which are similar to abortion cases. She goes on (...)
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  34. Paul A. Roth (1983). Personhood, Property Rights, and the Permissibility of Abortion. Law and Philosophy 2 (2):163 - 191.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this paper is to argue that the tactic of granting a fetus the legal status of a person will not, contrary to the expectations of opponents of abortion, provide grounds for a general prohibition on abortions. I begin by examining two arguments, one moral (J. J. Thomson's A Defense of Abortion) and the other legal (D. Regan's Rewriting Roe v. Wade), which grant the assumption that a fetus is a person and yet argue to the (...)
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  35. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2010). Rethinking Roe V. Wade : Defending the Abortion Right in the Face of Contemporary Opposition. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):33-46.score: 24.0
    In 2008, many states sought to pass Human Life Amendments, which would extend the definition of personhood to encompass newly fertilized eggs. If such an amendment were to pass, Roe v. Wade, as currently defended by the Supreme Court, may be repealed. Consequently, it is necessary to defend the right to an abortion in a manner that succeeds even if a Human Life Amendment successfully passes. J.J. Thomson's argument in ?A Defense of Abortion? successfully achieves this. Her argument is (...)
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  36. Jennifer Radden (ed.) (2004). The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This is a comprehensive resource of original essays by leading thinkers exploring the newly emerging inter-disciplinary field of the philosophy of psychiatry. The contributors aim to define this exciting field and to highlight the philosophical assumptions and issues that underlie psychiatric theory and practice, the category of mental disorder, and rationales for its social, clinical and legal treatment. As a branch of medicine and a healing practice, psychiatry relies on presuppositions that are deeply and unavoidably philosophical. Conceptions of rationality, (...)
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  37. Suzanne Holland (2001). Contested Commodities at Both Ends of Life: Buying and Selling Gametes, Embryos, and Body Tissues. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (3):263-284.score: 24.0
    : This essay examines the increasing commodification of the body with respect to tissues, gametes, and embryos. Such commodification contributes to a diminishing sense of human personhood on an individual level, even as it erodes commitments to human flourishing at the societal level. After the case for social harm resulting from the increasing commodification of the body is made, the question becomes whether that harm is best remedied by following any of three approaches by which government traditionally seeks to (...)
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  38. Randall A. Poole (2006). Sergei Kotliarevskii and the Rule of Law in Russian Liberal Theory. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (1-2):81-104.score: 24.0
    This essay is an explication and analysis of the work of Sergei Kotliarevskii, a major Russian liberal theorist, focusing on his 1915 treatise Vlast’ i pravo. Problema pravovogo gosudarstva (Power and Law: The Problem of the Lawful State). Although the “lawful state” has long been a subject of interest and controversy (even at the definitional level) among historians and political scientists, curiously Kotliarevskii has not received the attention he deserves. His study of the concept of the lawful state, which for (...)
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  39. Judy Illes & Eric Racine (2005). Imaging or Imagining? A Neuroethics Challenge Informed by Genetics. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):5 – 18.score: 24.0
    From a twenty-first century partnership between bioethics and neuroscience, the modern field of neuroethics is emerging, and technologies enabling functional neuroimaging with unprecedented sensitivity have brought new ethical, social and legal issues to the forefront. Some issues, akin to those surrounding modern genetics, raise critical questions regarding prediction of disease, privacy and identity. However, with new and still-evolving insights into our neurobiology and previously unquantifiable features of profoundly personal behaviors such as social attitude, value and moral agency, the difficulty (...)
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  40. Andy Miah, Gene-Doping: Sport, Values & Bioethics.score: 24.0
    This paper problematises the ethics of genetic modification (GM) in sport by outlining the perspectives of four organisations which have recently spent time considering the subject: the International Olympic Committee, the World Anti-Doping Agency, the United States President’s Council on Bioethics, and the Australian Law Reforms Commission. The paper outlines scientific developments in genetic research, which might make realisable the genetic engineering of athletes. Subsequently, an overview of the varied perspectives of the four organisations is given, by articulating the moral (...)
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  41. Annie Janvier, Karen Lynn Bauer & John D. Lantos (2007). Are Newborns Morally Different From Older Children? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):413-425.score: 24.0
    Policies and position statements regarding decision-making for extremely premature babies exist in many countries and are often directive, focusing on parental choice and expected outcomes. These recommendations often state survival and handicap as reasons for optional intervention. The fact that such outcome statistics would not justify such approaches in other populations suggests that some other powerful factors are at work. The value of neonatal intensive care has been scrutinized far more than intensive care for older patients and suggests that neonatal (...)
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  42. Michael Nair-Collins (2013). Brain Death, Paternalism, and the Language of “Death”. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):53-104.score: 24.0
    The controversy over brain death and the dead donor rule continues unabated, with some of the same key points and positions starting to see repetition in the literature. One might wonder whether some of the participants are talking past each other, not all debating the same issue, even though they are using the same words (e.g., “death”). One reason for this is the complexity of the debate: It’s not merely about the nature of human life and death. Interwoven into this (...)
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  43. Michael J. Phillips (1992). Corporate Moral Personhood and Three Conceptions of the Corporation. Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (4):435-459.score: 24.0
    Despite some exceptions, the business ethics literature on the moral responsibility of corporations does not emphasize a subject critical to that inquiry: the general nature of corporations. This article attempts to lessen the imbalance by describing three conceptions of the corporation that have been prominent in twentieth century legal theorizing, and by sketching their implications for the moral responsibility of corporations. These three conceptions, at least two of which have counterparts in the philosophical and organizational theory literature, are the (...)
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  44. K. E. Gover (2012). Christoph Büchel V. Mass MoCA: A Tilted Arc for the Twenty-First Century. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):46-58.score: 24.0
    The 1990 Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA) is a provision of U.S. copyright law that seeks to protect the noneconomic rights of artists, called "moral rights." These rights are due to the "presumed intimate bond between artists and their works."1 In the United States it protects rights of artistic attribution and integrity: the artwork cannot be claimed as the work of another, and it cannot be distorted. In some cases VARA protects artworks from destruction. But what is the nature of (...)
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  45. Robert A. Miller (1998). Lifesizing in an Era of Downsizing: An Ethical Quandary. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (15):1693-1700.score: 24.0
    Corporate executives, at the behest of Wall Street, have embraced the heresy of upsizing short-term shareholder profits by downsizing the long-term work force. This restructuring of corporate America, which views the corporation as an investment organization rather than a social organization, has created an ethical quandary by removing from the equation a sense of larger-purpose. This paper proposes a new paradigm, LIFESIZING, to address the issues raised by this ethical quandary. The paper will explore the effect the creation of fictitious (...)
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  46. Samir Chopra, Artificial Agents - Personhood in Law and Philosophy.score: 24.0
    validity of attributes that have been suggested as pointers of personand obligations on behalf of his household; his wife and children hood, and conclude that they will take their place within a broader were only indirectly the subject of legal rights and his slaves were matrix of pragmatic, philosophical and extra-legal concepts.
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  47. Richard T. Hull, Autonomy, Personhood, and the Right to Psychiatric Treatment.score: 24.0
    In the May, 1960, issue of the American Bar Association Journal (vol. 499), Morton Birnbaum, a lawyer and physician, argued for a legal right to psychiatric treatment of the involuntarily committed mentally ill person. In the 18 years since his article appeared,, there have been several key court cases in which this concept of a right to psychiatric treatment has figured prominently and decisively. It is important to note that the language of the decisions have had at least an (...)
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  48. Hilde Lindemann (2009). "… but I Could Never Have One": The Abortion Intuition and Moral Luck. Hypatia 24 (1):41 - 55.score: 24.0
    Starting from the intuition, shared by many women, that the legal right to an abortion must be defended but that they themselves could never undergo one, I offer an account of why pregnancy is morally valuable and why, nevertheless, it is often permissible to end one. Developing the idea that human pregnancy centrally involves the activity of calling a fetus into personhood, I argue that the permissibility of stopping this activity hinges on the goodness or badness of one's (...)
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  49. Ermanno Vitale (2010). Philosophical Reason and Human Rights in the Thought of Norberto Bobbio. Iris 2 (4):385-400.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I focus on Norberto Bobbio’s reflections on human rights. Firstly, I seek to establish his underlying conception of philosophy: although it is impossible to spell out the philosophical foundations of human rights, this does not imply that philosophical thought, in the sense of critical reason, cannot make a useful contribution and provide valuable arguments in support of human rights. Secondly, I examine the related issue of the justification of human rights and assess his theory on the basis (...)
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  50. Ruth Boeker (forthcoming). The Moral Dimension in Locke's Account of Persons and Personal Identity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 31.score: 24.0
    I offer an interpretation of John Locke’s account of persons and personal identity that gives full credit to Locke’s claim that “person” is a forensic term, sheds new light on the relation between Locke’s characterizations of a person in sections 9 and 26, and explains how Locke links his moral and legal account of personhood to his account of personal identity in terms of sameness of consciousness. I show that Locke’s claim that sameness of consciousness is necessary for (...)
     
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