Search results for 'Legal research Automation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pompeu Casanovas Romeu (ed.) (2007). Trends in Legal Knowledge: The Semantic Web and the Regulation of Electronic Social Systems: Papers From the B-4 Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Law, May 25th- 27th 2005: Xxii World Congress of Philosophy Ivr '05 Granada, May 24th-29th 2005. [REVIEW] European Press Academic Pub..score: 225.0
  2. Vern R. Walker, Nathaniel Carie, Courtney C. DeWitt & Eric Lesh (2011). A Framework for the Extraction and Modeling of Fact-Finding Reasoning From Legal Decisions: Lessons From the Vaccine/Injury Project Corpus. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 19 (4):291-331.score: 198.0
    This article describes the Vaccine/Injury Project Corpus, a collection of legal decisions awarding or denying compensation for health injuries allegedly due to vaccinations, together with models of the logical structure of the reasoning of the factfinders in those cases. This unique corpus provides useful data for formal and informal logic theory, for natural-language research in linguistics, and for artificial intelligence research. More importantly, the article discusses lessons learned from developing protocols for manually extracting the logical structure and (...)
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  3. Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.) (2010). The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 180.0
    The art, craft, and science of policing -- Crime and criminals -- Criminal process and prosecution -- The crime-preventive impact of penal sanctions -- Contracts and corporations -- Financial markets -- Consumer protection -- Bankruptcy and insolvency -- Regulating the professions -- Personal injury litigation -- Claiming behavior as legal mobilization -- Families -- Labor and employment laws -- Housing and property -- Human rights instruments -- Constitutions -- Social security and social welfare -- Occupational safety and health -- (...)
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  4. Andrew Stranieri, John Zeleznikow, Mark Gawler & Bryn Lewis (1999). A Hybrid Rule – Neural Approach for the Automation of Legal Reasoning in the Discretionary Domain of Family Law in Australia. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (2-3):153-183.score: 171.0
    Few automated legal reasoning systems have been developed in domains of law in which a judicial decision maker has extensive discretion in the exercise of his or her powers. Discretionary domains challenge existing artificial intelligence paradigms because models of judicial reasoning are difficult, if not impossible to specify. We argue that judicial discretion adds to the characterisation of law as open textured in a way which has not been addressed by artificial intelligence and law researchers in depth. We demonstrate (...)
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  5. Anthony Bradney (2010). The Place of Empirical Legal Research in the Law School Curriculum. In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
     
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  6. Lee Epstein & Andrew D. Martin (2010). Quantitative Approaches to Empirical Legal Research. In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
     
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  7. Herbert M. Kritzer (2010). The (Nearly) Forgotten Early Empirical Legal Research. In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
     
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  8. Laura Beth Nielsen (2010). The Need for Multi-Method Approaches in Empirical Legal Research. In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
     
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  9. Martin Partington (2010). Empirical Legal Research and Policy-Making. In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
     
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  10. Lisa Webley (2010). Qualitative Approaches to Empirical Legal Research. In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
     
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  11. E. T. Feteris (1997). A Survey of 25 Years of Research on Legal Argumentation. Argumentation 11 (3):355-376.score: 156.0
    This essay discusses the developments and trends of research in legalargumentation of the last 25 years. The essay starts with a survey of thevarious approaches which can be distinguished: the logical approach, therhetorical approach, and the dialogical approach. Then it identifies varioustopics in the research, which constitute the various components of aresearch programme of legal argumentation: the philosophical component, thetheoretical component, the reconstruction component, the empiricalcomponent, and the practical component. It concludes with a discussion ofthe main trends (...)
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  12. John Zeleznikow (2002). An Australian Perspective on Research and Development Required for the Construction of Applied Legal Decision Support Systems. Artificial Intelligence and Law 10 (4):237-260.score: 156.0
    At the Donald Berman Laboratory for Information Technology and Law, La TrobeUniversity Australia, we have been building legal decision support systems for a dozenyears. Whilst most of our energy has been devoted to conducting research in ArtificialIntelligence and Law, over the past few years we have increasingly focused uponbuilding legal decision support systems that have a commercial focus.In this paper we discuss the evolution of our systems. We begin with a discussion ofrule-based systems and discuss the transition (...)
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  13. Christian Lenk, Nils Hoppe, Katharian Beier & Claudia Wiesemann (eds.) (2011). Human Tissue Research. A European Perspective on the Ethical and Legal Challenges. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
    It will be of value to medics and social scientists, human tissue researchers, and policy makers who have an interest in ethical and legal issues of human tissue research.
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  14. Anja Oskamp & Maaike W. Tragter (1997). Automated Legal Decision Systems in Practice: The Mirror of Reality. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 5 (4):291-322.score: 155.0
    Automated decision systems are often used to enforce legislation.As such, they have considerable regulating effects. These systemsregulate the behaviour of users and addressees mainly throughstandardization. This research classifies these systems intocategories according to which the regulating effects can bedescribed more clearly. Furthermore, this categorization resultsin a better understanding how problems encountered with atpresent can be avoided in the future. Many problems result fromthe way the development process has been organized. It turns outthe development process can be divided according to (...)
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  15. Mark van Hoecke (ed.) (2011). Methodologies of Legal Research: Which Kind of Method for What Kind of Discipline? Portland, Or.Hart.score: 152.0
     
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  16. Paul Litton, Non-Beneficial Pediatric Research and the Best Interests Standard: A Legal and Ethical Reconciliation.score: 150.0
    Federal efforts beginning in the 1990's have successfully increased pediatric research to improve medical care for all children. Since 1997, the FDA has requested 800 pediatric studies involving 45,000 children. Much of this research is "non-beneficial"; that is, it exposes pediatric subjects to risk even though these children will not benefit from participating in the research. Non-beneficial pediatric research (NBPR) seems, by definition, contrary to the best interests of pediatric subjects, which is why one state supreme (...)
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  17. D. J. Galligan (2010). Legal Theory and Empirical Research. In Peter Cane & Herbert M. Kritzer (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Empirical Legal Research. Oxford University Press.score: 148.0
     
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  18. C. Parker (2009). The Legal Research Committee: A Response to Roy-Toole. Research Ethics 5 (1):30-32.score: 146.0
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  19. Daniel O. Taube & Susan Burkhardt (1997). Ethical and Legal Risks Associated with Archival Research. Ethics and Behavior 7 (1):59 – 67.score: 144.0
    Mental health facilities and practitioners commonly permit researchers to have direct access to patients' records for the purposes of archival research without the informed consent of patient-participants. Typically these researchers have access to all information in such records as long as they agree to maintain confidentiality and remove any identifying data from subsequent research reports. Changes in the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles (American Psychological Association, 1992) raise ethical and legal issues that require consideration by practitioners, researchers, (...)
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  20. Mutsawashe Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Rosemary Musesengwa, Kusum Nathoo, Patrick Takaidza, Tawanda Mhute & Tichaona Vhembo (2012). Ethical and Legal Constraints to Children's Participation in Research in Zimbabwe: Experiences From the Multicenter Pediatric Hiv Arrow Trial. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):17-.score: 144.0
    Background: Clinical trials involving children previously considered unethical are now considered a necessity because of the inherent physiological differences between children and adults. An integral part of research ethics is the informed consent, which for children is obtained by proxy from a consenting parent or guardian. The informed consent process is governed by international ethical codes that are interpreted in accordance with local laws and procedures raising the importance of contextualizing their implementation.DiscussionThe Zimbabwean parental informed consent document for children (...)
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  21. David B. Resnik & Efthimios Parasidis (forthcoming). Waiving Legal Rights in Research. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101547.score: 144.0
    The US federal research regulations prohibit informed consent, whether written or oral, from including provisions in which human subjects waive or appear to waive legal rights. We argue that policies that prevent human subjects from waiving legal rights in research can be ethically justified under the rationale of group, soft paternalism. These policies protect competent adults from making adverse decisions about health and legal matters that they may not understand fully. However, this rationale is less (...)
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  22. Carlos Romeo-Casabona (2004). Legal Perspectives in Novel Psychiatric Treatment and Related Research. Poiesis and Praxis 2 (4):315-328.score: 144.0
    The new generation of psychopharmacological products have proved their efficacy. Some neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, could be treated by means of the gene therapy. Although the aetiology of such diseases is still not completely known, it has been proven that the patients lack some substances that could be produced by means of the transfer of in vivo or ex vivo genes that codify them in the proper places of the brain. Furthermore, it is announced that the (...)
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  23. Randi Zlotnik Shaul, Shelley Birenbaum & Megan Evans (2005). Legal Liabilities in Research: Early Lessons From North America. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-4.score: 144.0
    The legal risks associated with health research involving human subjects have been highlighted recently by a number of lawsuits launched against those involved in conducting and evaluating the research. Some of these cases have been fully addressed by the legal system, resulting in judgments that provide some guidance. The vast majority of cases have either settled before going to trial, or have not yet been addressed by the courts, leaving us to wonder what might have been (...)
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  24. Takako Tsujimura-Ito, Yusuke Inoue & Ken-Ichi Yoshida (forthcoming). Organ Retention and Communication of Research Use Following Medico-Legal Autopsy: A Pilot Survey of University Forensic Medicine Departments in Japan. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101151.score: 144.0
    This study investigated the circumstances and problems that departments of forensic medicine encounter with bereaved families regarding samples obtained from medico-legal autopsies. A questionnaire was posted to all 76 departments of forensic medicine performing medico-legal autopsies in Japan, and responses were received from 48 (63.2%). Of the respondents, 12.8% had approached and communicated with bereaved families about collecting samples from the deceased person during an autopsy and the storage of the samples. In addition, 23.4% of these had informed (...)
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  25. Catherine M. Daily (1996). Candor, Privacy, and "Legal Immunity" in Business Ethics Research. Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (1):87-99.score: 144.0
    Many areas of business ethics research are “sensitive.” We provide an empirical assessment of the randomized response techniquewhich provides absolute anonymity to subjects and “legal immunity” to the researcher. Beyond that, RRT techniques provide complete disclosure to subjects, unconditional privacy is maintained, and there is no deception.
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  26. Mindaugas Maksimaitis & Stasys Vėlyvis (2011). The Beginning of Lithuanian Roman Legal System Research and its Pioneer, A. Tamošaitis (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (3):805-820.score: 144.0
    Based on archival documents, regulatory and other official materials, as well as the press of that time, the article attempts to shed some light on the complex beginning of Lithuanian Roman legal system research. Since the beginning of theUniversity law degree in 1922, the Roman law courses (then divided into history and dogma, the system) were taught with an exclusive focus. However, while assembling the faculty of professors at the Lithuanian university, in the beginning they had to content (...)
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  27. Edward L. Beard & Larry W. Johnson (2001). Legal Research. Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 3 (4):103-105.score: 140.0
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  28. Ephraim Tutt & Perry Mason (2001). Tarlton Law Library Jamail Center for Legal Research. Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 13 (2).score: 140.0
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  29. Judge Christian Byk (2002). Conflicts of Interests and Access to Information Resulting From Biomedical Research: An International Legal Perspective. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):287-290.score: 138.0
    Recently adopted international texts have given a new focus on conflicts of interests and access to information resulting from biomedical research. They confirmed ethical review committees as a central point to guarantee individual rights and the effective application of ethical principles. Therefore specific attention should be paid in giving such committees all the facilities necessary to keep them independent and qualified.
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  30. Anna C. Mastroianni, Ruth R. Faden & Daniel D. Federman (eds.) (1994). Women and Health Research: Ethical and Legal Issues of Including Women in Clinical Studies. National Academy Press.score: 138.0
    Executive Summary There is a general perception that biomedical research has not given the same attention to the health problems of women that it has given ...
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  31. Nola M. Ries, Jane LeGrandeur & Timothy Caulfield (2010). Handling Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Birth Cohort Studies Involving Genetic Research: Responses From Studies in Six Countries. BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):4.score: 138.0
    Research involving minors has been the subject of much ethical debate. The growing number of longitudinal, pediatric studies that involve genetic research present even more complex challenges to ensure appropriate protection of children and families as research participants. Long-term studies with a genetic component involve collection, retention and use of biological samples and personal information over many years. Cohort studies may be established to study specific conditions (e.g. autism, asthma) or may have a broad aim to (...) a range of factors that influence the health and development of children. Studies are increasingly intended to serve as research platforms by providing access to data and biological samples to researchers over many years. (shrink)
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  32. Carla Truyers, Eliane Kellen, Marc Arbyn, Leen Trommelmans, Herman Nys, Karen Hensen, Bert Aertgeerts, Stefaan Bartholomeeusen, Mats Hansson & Frank Buntinx (2010). The Use of Human Tissue in Epidemiological Research; Ethical and Legal Considerations in Two Biobanks in Belgium. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):169-175.score: 138.0
    This paper discusses the legal implications of setting up two new biobanks in Belgium. The first is hospital-based and will archive tissue from patients with haematologic cancer, whereas the second is linked to a general practice based morbidity registry and will involve storage of blood samples. To date, Belgium has no specific legislation that regulates storage of human tissue and related databases. Several issues concerning the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal medical data are discussed (...)
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  33. Judith K. Bernhard & Julie E. E. Young (2009). Gaining Institutional Permission: Researching Precarious Legal Status in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):175-191.score: 132.0
    There is limited research into the situations of people living with precarious status in Canada, which includes people whose legal status is in-process, undocumented, or unauthorized, many of whom entered the country with a temporary resident visa, through family sponsorship arrangements, or as refugee claimants. In 2005, a community-university alliance sought to carry out a research study of the lived experiences of people living with precarious status. In this paper, we describe our negotiation of the ethics review (...)
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  34. Udo Schuklenk & Anita Kleinsmidt (2006). North–South Benefit Sharing Arrangements in Bioprospecting and Genetic Research: A Critical Ethical and Legal Analysis. Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):060814034439002-???.score: 132.0
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  35. Udo Schüklenk & Anita Kleinsmidt (2006). North–South Benefit Sharing Arrangements in Bioprospecting and Genetic Research: A Critical Ethical and Legal Analysis. Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):122–134.score: 132.0
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  36. Gary Edmond (2008). Judging the Scientific and Medical Literature: Some Legal Implications of Changes to Biomedical Research and Publication. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (3):523-561.score: 132.0
    Over the last two decades judges (and regulators) in all common law jurisdictions have increased their reliance on published medical and scientific literature. During the same period biomedical research has undergone fundamental and unprecedented change. This article explores some of the changes to the location, organization and funding of biomedical research in order to assess their implications for liability and proof. Focusing on peer review and publication, along with reforms promoted by the editors of some of the world's (...)
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  37. Denis Collins (1989). Organizational Harm, Legal Condemnation and Stakeholder Retaliation: A Typology, Research Agenda and Application. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (1):1 - 13.score: 126.0
    The essence of the ethical issues pertinent to business activities is the harm or benefit that occurs as part of a company's resource transformation process. A typology is developed that sorts ethical issues according to three variables: (1) the nature of the harm, (2) the nature of those harmed and (3) the transformation stage where the harm occurs. Propositions are formulated that would enable analysts and practitioners to predict the degree of legal condemnation of, and stakeholder retaliation to, harms (...)
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  38. Christopher Hogan, Robert S. Bauer & Dan Brassil (2010). Automation of Legal Sensemaking in E-Discovery. Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):431-457.score: 126.0
    Retrieval of relevant unstructured information from the ever-increasing textual communications of individuals and businesses has become a major barrier to effective litigation/defense, mergers/acquisitions, and regulatory compliance. Such e-discovery requires simultaneously high precision with high recall (high-P/R) and is therefore a prototype for many legal reasoning tasks. The requisite exhaustive information retrieval (IR) system must employ very different techniques than those applicable in the hyper-precise, consumer search task where insignificant recall is the accepted norm. We apply Russell, et al.’s cognitive (...)
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  39. M. D. AttyAlbert D. Rebosa & Atty Renato B. Manaloto (2008). Legal Issues in Health Research. In Angeles Tan-Alora (ed.), Introduction to Health Research Ethics: Philippine Health Research Ethics Board. Philippine National Health Research System.score: 126.0
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  40. Mutsa Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Rosemary Musesengwa, Kusum J. Nathoo, Patrick Takaidza, Tawanda Mhute & Tichaona Vhembo (2012). Ethical and Legal Constraints to Children's Participation in Research in Zimbabwe: Experiences From the Multicenter Pediatric Hiv Arrow Trial. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):17.score: 126.0
    Clinical trials involving children previously considered unethical are now considered essential because of the inherent physiological differences between children and adults. An integral part of research ethics is the informed consent, which for children is obtained by proxy from a consenting parent or guardian. The informed consent process is governed by international ethical codes that are interpreted in accordance with local laws and procedures raising the importance of contextualizing their implementation.
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  41. Christian Byk (2002). Conflicts of Interests and Access to Information Resulting From Biomedical Research: An International Legal Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):287-290.score: 126.0
    Recently adopted international texts have given a new focus on conflicts of interests and access to information resulting from biomedical research. They confirmed ethical review committees as a central point to guarantee individual rights and the effective application of ethical principles. Therefore specific attention should be paid in giving such committees all the facilities necessary to keep them independent and qualified.
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  42. A. M. Capron (2008). Legal and Regulatory Standards of Informed Consent in Research. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 613--32.score: 126.0
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  43. Steven S. Coughlin & Angus Dawson (2014). Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Exposomics: A Call for Research Investment. Public Health Ethics 7 (3):207-210.score: 126.0
    The success of the Human Genome Project has prompted interest in advancing the nascent field of exposomics. The exposome, which is dynamic and variable and changes over time, consists of all the internal and external exposures an individual has over a lifetime beginning with the prenatal period and early childhood. Efforts are underway to decipher the human epigenome by identifying the effects of all deleterious environmental exposures according to duration of exposure and time period. In this article, we argue that (...)
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  44. Ana S. Iltis (2006). Research, Development, and the Availability of Health Care Products: The Market, Regulation, and Legal Liability. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):195-208.score: 120.0
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  45. Arianna Greco & Amedeo Santosuosso (2004). Legal Regulations, Research and Human Subjects. Global Bioethics 17 (1):131-136.score: 120.0
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  46. Marie Fox (2009). The Legal Regulation of Primate Research. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):13-15.score: 120.0
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  47. Benjamin Freedman, Kathleen Cranley Glass & Charles Weijer (1996). Placebo Orthodoxy in Clinical Research II: Ethical, Legal, and Regulatory Myths. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):252-259.score: 120.0
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  48. Rosario M. Isasi, Bartha M. Knoppers, Peter A. Singer & Abdallah S. Daar (2004). Legal and Ethical Approaches to Stem Cell and Cloning Research: A Comparative Analysis of Policies in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):626-640.score: 120.0
  49. Roberta M. Berry (2003). Genetic Information and Research: Emerging Legal Issues. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 15 (1):70-99.score: 120.0
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  50. Jessica Wilen Berg (1996). Legal and Ethical Complexities of Consent with Cognitively Impaired Research Subjects: Proposed Guidelines. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (1):18-35.score: 120.0
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