Search results for 'Legislation, Medical' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  19
    Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith (1998). Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty (...)
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  2.  11
    Robert Mullan Cook-Deegan (1998). Commentary on “Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation” (J. S. Alper and J. Beckwith). [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):151-154.
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  3.  2
    Kori Cook, Jeremy Snyder & John Calvert (2015). Attitudes Toward Post‐Trial Access to Medical Interventions: A Review of Academic Literature, Legislation, and International Guidelines. [REVIEW] Developing World Bioethics 16 (1):n/a-n/a.
    There is currently no international consensus around post-trial obligations toward research participants, community members, and host countries. This literature review investigates arguments and attitudes toward post-trial access. The literature review found that academic discussions focused on the rights of research participants, but offered few practical recommendations for addressing or improving current practices. Similarly, there are few regulations or legislation pertaining to post-trial access. If regulatory changes are necessary, we need to understand the current arguments, legislation, and attitudes towards post-trial access (...)
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  4.  1
    L. Gillam & K. Weedon (2005). Medical Research and Involuntary Mental Health Patients: Implications of Proposed Changes to Legislation in Victoria. Monash Bioethics Review 24 (4).
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  5. José Miola (2007). Medical Ethics and Medical Law: A Symbiotic Relationship. Hart.
    Introduction -- Historical perspectives of medical ethics -- The medical ethics Renaissance: a brief assessment -- Risk disclosure/'informed consent' -- Consent, control and minors: Gillick and beyond -- Sterilisation/best interests: legislation intervenes -- The end of life: total abrogation -- Medical ethics in government-commissioned reports -- Conclusion.
     
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  6. J. K. Mason (2003/2002). Law and Medical Ethics. Lexisnexis Uk.
    This new edition of Law and Medical Ethics continues to chart the ever-widening field that the topics cover. The interplay between the health caring professions and the public during the period intervening since the last edition has, perhaps, been mainly dominated by wide-ranging changes in the administration of the National Health Service and of the professions themselves but these have been paralleled by important developments in medical jurisprudence.
     
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  7. Jonathan Herring (2008). Medical Law and Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This book provides a clear, concise description of medical law; but it does more than that. It also provides an introduction to the ethical principles that can be used to challenge or support the law. It also provides a range of perspectives from which to analyse the law: feminist, religious and sociological perspectives are all used.
     
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  8. J. K. Mason (2005). Mason & Mccall Smith's Law and Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Mason and McCall Smith's classic textbook discusses the relationship of medical practice and ethics with the operation of the law. The subjects covered include natural and assisted reproduction, the impact of modern genetics on medicine, medical confidentiality, consent to medical treatment, the use of resources and problems surrounding death in the new medical era. It is of significance to anyone with an interest in the ethical and legal practice of medicine.
     
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  9.  54
    Ian Kennedy (1988). Treat Me Right: Essays in Medical Law and Ethics. Clarendon Press.
    Controversial and amusing, this collection of Kennedy's writings illuminates the rights, duties, and liabilities of doctors as well as other aspects of medical law and ethics.
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  10.  8
    Kerry J. Breen (ed.) (2010). Good Medical Practice: Professionalism, Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.
    Written by specialist practitioners with vast teaching experience, this is a unique, timely and accessible text that reinforces a contemporary focus on professionalism in medical practice.
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  11. C. Adèle Kent (2005). Medical Ethics: The State of the Law. Lexisnexis Butterworths.
     
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  12.  11
    Kerry J. Breen (1997). Ethics, Law, and Medical Practice. Allen & Unwin.
    Comprehensive and practical handbook on ethical and legal issues affectingGpsand other practitioners.
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  13. Josue N. Bellosillo (ed.) (2010). Basics of Philippine Medical Jurisprudence and Ethics. Central Book Supply.
     
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  14. Leanne Bell (2012). Medical Law and Ethics. Pearson.
     
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  15. Sheila Mclean (1999). Old Law, New Medicine Medical Ethics and Human Rights.
     
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  16.  19
    David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
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  17.  36
    Jerry Menikoff (2006). What the Doctor Didn't Say: The Hidden Truth About Medical Research. Oxford University Press.
    Most people know precious little about the risks and benefits of participating in a clinical trial--a medical research study involving some innovative treatment for a medical problem. Yet millions of people each year participate anyway. Patients at Risk explains the reality: that our current system intentionally hides much of the information people need to make the right choice about whether to participate. Witness the following scenarios: -Hundreds of patients with colon cancer undergo a new form of keyhole surgery (...)
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  18.  40
    Elliot N. Dorff (1998). Matters of Life and Death: A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics. Jewish Publication Society.
    In Matters of Life and Death Elliot Dorff thoroughly addresses this unavoidable confluence of medical technology and Jewish law and ethics.
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  19. Alireza Bagheri (2013). Medical Futility: A Cross-National Study. Imperial College Press.
    So-called futile care : the experience of the Unied States -- The reality of medical futility in Brazil -- Medical futility and end-of-lfe issues in Belgium -- The concept of medical futility in Venezuela -- Medical futility in Russian Federation -- Medical futility in Australia -- Medical futility in Japan -- Ethical issues and policy in medical futility in China -- Medical futility in Korea -- Medical futility from Swiss perspective -- (...)
     
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  20.  7
    Jennifer Moore (2013). Proposed Changes to New Zealand's Medicines Legislation in the Medicines Amendment Bill 2011. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):59-66.
    This article evaluates New Zealand’s Medicines Amendment Bill 2011. This Bill is currently before Parliament and will amend the Medicines Act 1981. On June 20, 2011, the Australian and New Zealand governments announced their decision to proceed with a joint scheme for the regulation of therapeutic products such as medicines, medical devices, and new medical interventions. Eventually, the joint arrangements will be administered by a single regulatory agency: the Australia New Zealand Therapeutic Products Agency. The medicines regulations in (...)
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  21. David Lloyd (2005). Cases in Medical Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.
    This interactive independent teaching and learning tutorial can be used by individuals or small groups and takes a problem-based-learning approach to the complex legal and ethical issues raised by six scenarios. Based on real cases clearly demonstrating the problems arising from recent medical advancements, the cases cover reproductive technology, consent, genetic screening, participation in research trials, paternity and confidentiality. Additional features of the CD-ROM are a comprehensive glossary, cross-references to The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook and definitions from the (...)
     
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  22. Charles Foster (2009). Choosing Life, Choosing Death: The Tyranny of Autonomy in Medical Ethics and Law. Hart Pub..
  23.  1
    Paul Ramsey (1978). Ethics at the Edges of Life: Medical and Legal Intersections. Yale University Press.
    In this book, Ramsey addresses the moral problems of medicine, life and death and not merely to those who share his faith.
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  24. Robert F. Weir (1989). Abating Treatment with Critically Ill Patients: Ethical and Legal Limits to the Medical Prolongation of Life. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers an in-depth analysis of the wide range of issues surrounding "passive euthanasia" and "allow-to-die" decisions. The author develops a comprehensive conceptual model that is highly useful for assessing and dealing with real-life situations. He presents an informative historical overview, an evaluation of the clinical settings in which treatment abatement takes place, and an insightful discussion of relevant legal aspects. The result is a clearly articulated ethical analysis that is medically realistic, philosophically sound, and legally viable.
     
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  25. Jing-Bao Nie (2012). Medical Ethics in China: A Transcultural Interpretation. Routledge.
     
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  26. Stephen W. Smith (2012). End-of-Life Decisions in Medical Care: Principles and Policies for Regulating the Dying Process. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction -- Moral status -- The value of life -- Killing versus letting die and moral responsibility -- Autonomy and paternalism -- Beneficence, non-maleficence and harm -- Dignity -- A comprehensive ethical approach -- Introduction to Part Two -- Protection of patients -- The impact on health care practitioners -- Greater societal issues -- Slippery slope arguments -- Necessary procedural protections -- Conclusions.
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  27. Mansoor Elahi (2011). Medical Ethics: A Practical Guide to Patient Care, Related Ethics, Conventions and Laws. Mtro Medical Publishing.
     
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  28. Marc D. Hiller (ed.) (1981). Medical Ethics and the Law: Implications for Public Policy. Ballinger Pub. Co..
     
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  29. Rosamond Rhodes, Leslie Francis & Anita Silvers (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Medical Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
     
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  30. Akiva Tatz (2010). Dangerous Disease & Dangerous Therapy in Jewish Medical Ethics: Principles and Practice. Targum Press.
     
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  31.  48
    T. Dalyell (1975). Tissue for Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):61-62.
    In this article Mr Tam Dalyell mp uses extracts from the speech1 he made in the House of Commons on 11 December 1974 to reiterate his reasons for persisting in his attempts to have formulated in law the right of hospitals to take such organs from a dead person as might be useful unless before death potential donors (all of us) had stated that they did not consent. Details of those objecting would be registered on a central computer.
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  32.  4
    J. Savulescu (2013). Elective Ventilation and Interests. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):129-129.
    This paper examines questions concerning elective ventilation, contextualised within English law and policy. It presents the general debate with reference both to the Exeter Protocol on elective ventilation, and the considerable developments in legal principle since the time that that protocol was declared to be unlawful. I distinguish different aspects of what might be labelled elective ventilation policies under the following four headings: ‘basic elective ventilation’; ‘epistemically complex elective ventilation’; ‘practically complex elective ventilation’; and ‘epistemically and practically complex elective ventilation’. (...)
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  33.  51
    J. Mahoney (1975). Ethical Aspects of Donor Consent in Transplantation. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):67-70.
    Two recent events have caused renewed anxiety concerning the ethics of donor transplantation. The first is the report of the British Transplantation Society and the second is the Bill introduced by Mr Tam Dalyell MP (see page 61 of this issue) in which he seeks to establish by law that unless an individual in his life time has expressly contracted out his organs may after death be used for transplantation. Dr Mahoney in this paper therefore examines from the point of (...)
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  34. Ulf Schmidt (2004). Justice at Nuremberg: Leo Alexander and the Nazi Doctors' Trial. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Justice at Nuremberg traces the history of the Nuremberg Doctors' Trial held in 1946-47, as seen through the eyes of the Austrian bliogemigrbliogé psychiatrist Leo Alexander. His investigations helped the United States to prosecute twenty German doctors and three administrators for war crimes and crimes against humanity. The legacy of Nuremberg was profound. In the Nuremberg code--a landmark in the history of modern medical ethics--the judges laid down, for the first time, international guidelines for permissible experiments on humans. One (...)
     
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  35.  10
    Jeffrey A. Mello (2013). Employment and Public Policy Issues Surrounding Medical Marijuana in the Workplace. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):659-666.
    The status of marijuana as an illegal drug has greatly evolved in recent years. Many countries have decriminalized possession of marijuana for personal use. Others have not decriminalized it but simply “tolerate” it for private personal use. Four countries have passed laws legalizing medical marijuana and one other tolerates the use of marijuana for medical purposes without having legislated a specific right for such possession and use. To date, 17 of the United States and the District of Columbia (...)
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  36.  12
    María Carranza (2007). The Therapeutic Exception: Abortion, Sterilization and Medical Necessity in Costa Rica. Developing World Bioethics 7 (2):55–63.
    ABSTRACTBased on the case of Rosa, a nine‐year‐old girl who was denied a therapeutic abortion, this article analyzes the role played by the social in medical practice. For that purpose, it compares the different application of two similar pieces of legislation in Costa Rica, where both the practice of abortion and sterilization are restricted to the protection of health and life by the Penal Code. As a concept subject to interpretation, a broad conception of medical necessity could enable (...)
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  37.  8
    Michael D. A. Freeman & A. D. E. Lewis (eds.) (2000). Law and Medicine. Oxford University Press.
    This volume considers the many areas where medicine intersects with the law. Advances in medical research, reproductive science and genetics have given rise to unprecedented ethical and legal quandaries. These are reflected in chapters on cloning, organ donation, choosing genetic characteristics, and the use of Viagra.
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  38. Philip Howard (2005). Lecture Notes. Blackwell Pub..
    Nature and sources of medical ethics -- Sources of medical law -- Consent to treatment -- Confidentiality -- Clinical negligence -- Mental health -- Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000 -- The law in relation to abortion -- The ethics of abortion -- Reproductive technology and surrogacy -- The law in relation to end of life issues -- The ethics of end of life issues -- Research -- Maintaining standards and regulation -- Presenting evidence and reports -- The (...)
     
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  39.  12
    David W. Meyers (2006). The Human Body and the Law: A Medico-Legal Study. Aldine Transaction.
    Thus, Meyers provides a valuable account, not only of current medical attitudes, but also of relevant case and statute law as it stands at present.
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  40. Elizabeth Wicks (2007). Human Rights and Healthcare. Hart Pub..
    Introduction: human rights in healthcare -- A right to treatment? the allocation of resouces in the National Health Service -- Ensuring quality healthcare: an issue of rights or duties? -- Autonomy and consent in medical treatment -- Treating incompetent patients: beneficence, welfare and rights -- Medical confidentiality and the right to privacy -- Property right in the body -- Medically assisted conception and a right to reproduce? -- Termination of pregnancy: a conflict of rights -- Pregnancy and freedom (...)
     
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  41.  3
    Ayesha Humayun, Noor Fatima, Shahid Naqqash, Salwa Hussain, Almas Rasheed, Huma Imtiaz & Sardar Imam (2008). Patients' Perception and Actual Practice of Informed Consent, Privacy and Confidentiality in General Medical Outpatient Departments of Two Tertiary Care Hospitals of Lahore. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):14-.
    BackgroundThe principles of informed consent, confidentiality and privacy are often neglected during patient care in developing countries. We assessed the degree to which doctors in Lahore adhere to these principles during outpatient consultations.Material & MethodThe study was conducted at medical out-patient departments (OPDs) of two tertiary care hospitals (one public and one private hospital) of Lahore, selected using multi-stage sampling. 93 patients were selected from each hospital. Doctors' adherence to the principles of informed consent, privacy and confidentiality was observed (...)
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  42. Ian Kerridge (1998). Ethics and Law for the Health Professions. Social Science Press.
     
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  43. B. Brecher (2006). Why the Kantian Ideal Survives Medical Learning Curves, and Why It Matters. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (9):511-512.
    The ‘Kantian ideal’ is often misunderstood as invoking individual autonomy rather than rational self-legislation. Le Morvan and Stock’s otherwise insightful discussion of ‘Medical learning curves and the Kantian ideal’, for example, draws the mistaken inference that that ideal is inconsistent with the realities of medical practice. But it is not. Rationally to be a patient entails accepting its necessary conditions, one of which is the ineliminable existence of medical learning curves. Their rational necessity, therefore, offers no grounds (...)
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  44.  2
    G. Bosshard, B. Broeckaert, D. Clark, L. J. Materstvedt, B. Gordijn & H. C. Muller-Busch (2008). A Role for Doctors in Assisted Dying? An Analysis of Legal Regulations and Medical Professional Positions in Six European Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):28-32.
    Objectives: To analyse legislation and medical professional positions concerning the doctor’s role in assisted dying in western Europe, and to discuss their implications for doctors.Method: This paper is based on country-specific reports by experts from European countries where assisted dying is legalised , or openly practiced , or where it is illegal .Results: Laws on assisted dying in The Netherlands and Belgium are restricted to doctors. In principle, assisted suicide is not illegal in either Germany or Switzerland, but a (...)
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  45.  4
    T. M. Pope & M. Hexum (2012). Legal Briefing: Shared Decision Making and Patient Decision Aids. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (1):70-80.
    This “Legal Briefing” column covers recent legal developments involving patient decision aids. This topic has been the subject of recent articles in JCE. It is included in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. And it has received significant attention in the biomedical literature, including a new book, a thematic issue of Health Affairs, and a recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine. Moreover, physicians and health systems across the United States are increasingly integrating decision aids into (...)
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  46.  5
    G. Bravo (2003). Knowledge of the Legislation Governing Proxy Consent to Treatment and Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):44-50.
    Objective: To assess the knowledge of four groups of individuals regarding who is legally authorised to consent to health care or research involving older patients.Design: A provincewide postal survey.Setting: Province of Quebec, Canada.Participants: Three hundred older adults, 434 informal caregivers of cognitively impaired individuals, 98 researchers in aging and 136 members of research ethics boards .Measurements: Knowledge was assessed through a pretested postal questionnaire comprising five vignettes that describe hypothetical situations involving an older adult who requires medical care or (...)
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  47.  53
    J. K. Gevers (1992). Legislation on Euthanasia: Recent Developments in The Netherlands. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (3):138-141.
    Recently, new developments took place in the Dutch debate on the legislation of euthanasia. After a brief account of that debate, the article discusses a new government proposal for legislation in this field, which was submitted to the Dutch parliament in November 1991. This proposal relates not only to euthanasia but also to some other medical decisions concerning the end of life. The author concludes that, for several reasons, it is unsatisfactory.
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  48.  59
    I. H. Kerridge & K. R. Mitchell (1996). The Legislation of Active Voluntary Euthanasia in Australia: Will the Slippery Slope Prove Fatal? Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (5):273-278.
    At 2.00 am on the morning of May 24, 1995 the Northern Territory Legislative Assembly Australia passed the Rights of the Terminally Ill Act by the narrow margin of 15 votes to 10. The act permits a terminally ill patient of sound mind and over the age of 18 years, and who is either in pain or suffering, or distress, to request a medical practitioner to assist the patient to terminate his or her life. Thus, Australia can lay claim (...)
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  49.  8
    K. Diesfeld (2001). Disability Matters in Medical Law. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):388-392.
    The British Parliament stated that health services would be covered by the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 . However, when people with disabilities are at their most vulnerable, for example when in hospital or subject to medical procedures, the antidiscrimination law fails them. A review of cases indicates that when people with disabilities are subject to medical treatment, the legislative protections are allowed to vanish. Instead, medical decisions are justified on obscure notions such as “best interests”, often with (...)
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  50.  2
    Georg Bosshard, Bert Broeckaert, David Clark, Lars Johan Materstvedt, Bert Gordijn & H. Christof Müller-Busch (2008). A Role for Doctors in Assisted Dying? An Analysis of Legal Regulations and Medical Professional Positions in Six European Countries. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):28-32.
    Objectives: To analyse legislation and medical professional positions concerning the doctor’s role in assisted dying in western Europe, and to discuss their implications for doctors.Method: This paper is based on country-specific reports by experts from European countries where assisted dying is legalised , or openly practiced , or where it is illegal .Results: Laws on assisted dying in The Netherlands and Belgium are restricted to doctors. In principle, assisted suicide is not illegal in either Germany or Switzerland, but a (...)
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