Search results for 'Legislation, Nursing' (try it on Scholar)

29 found
Sort by:
  1. Jean V. McHale (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Butterworth Heinemann.score: 84.0
    " This book focuses on the relationship between human rights and nursing in these changing times.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jane Greenlaw (1984). Sermchief V. Gonzales and the Debate Over Advanced Nursing Practice Legislation. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 12 (1):30-31.score: 72.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Judith Hendrick (2004). Law and Ethics. Nelson Thornes.score: 48.0
    Provides an insight into the general principles of the professional-patient relationship.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. G. Anderson & M. V. Rorty (2001). Key Points for Developing an International Declaration on Nursing, Human Rights, Human Genetics and Public Health Policy. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):259-271.score: 48.0
    Human rights legislation pertaining to applications of human genetic science is still lacking at an international level. Three international human rights documents now serve as guidelines for countries wishing to develop such legislation. These were drafted and adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Human Genome Organization, and the Council of Europe. It is critically important that the international nursing community makes known its philosophy and practice-based knowledge relating to ethics and human rights, and contributes (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Margaret Keatings & Diana Dick (1989). Ethics and Politics of Resource Allocation: The Role of Nursing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):187 - 192.score: 42.0
    The use of ethics in everyday nursing practice will become increasingly important to the individual nurse, and nursing as a profession, as technology has a greater impact on health status and the provision of health care. Resource allocation is only one example of an ethical issue in which nursing must have input. Nursing can expand its contribution to society by ensuring that it plays a major role in shaping public policy and legislation. If nursing is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. A. Dreyer, R. Forde & P. Nortvedt (2010). Life-Prolonging Treatment in Nursing Homes: How Do Physicians and Nurses Describe and Justify Their Own Practice? Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (7):396-400.score: 42.0
    Background Making the right decisions, while simultaneously showing respect for patient autonomy, represents a great challenge to nursing home staff in the issues of life-prolonging treatment, hydration, nutrition and hospitalisation to dying patents in end-of-life. Objectives To study how physicians and nurses protect nursing home patients' autonomy in end-of-life decisions, and how they justify their practice. Design A qualitative descriptive design with analysis of the content of transcribed in-depth interviews with physicians and nurses. Participants Nine physicians and ten (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Mari Kangasniemi, Kirsi Viitalähde & Sanna Porkka (2010). A Theoretical Examination of the Rights of Nurses. Nursing Ethics 17 (5):628-635.score: 36.0
    Nurses’ duties and patients’ rights have been important foci in nursing. Nurses’ rights legitimate the power and responsibility of the profession. There are few published articles on this subject in the nursing science literature. This article is a theoretical examination of nurses’ rights that aims to structure (i.e. show the internal logic of) those that have been little studied. It is based on the philosophical literature and published research. Nurses’ rights can be divided into: human and civil rights, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. M. Kangasniemi, A. Stievano & A. -M. Pietila (2013). Nurses' Perceptions of Their Professional Rights. Nursing Ethics 20 (4):0969733012466001.score: 36.0
    The purpose of this study, which is part of a wider study of professional ethics, was to describe nurses’ perceptions of their rights in Italy. The data were collected by open-ended focus group interviews and analyzed with inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, three main themes were identified. The first theme “Unfamiliarity with rights” described nurses’ perception that their rights mirrored historical roots, educational content, and nurses’ and patients’ position in the society. The second theme, “Rights reflected in legislation” (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. Ketter (1997). Nurses and Strikes: A Perspective From the United States. Nursing Ethics 4 (4):323-329.score: 36.0
    In the United States, there has been a continuous debate between those who favour collective bargaining for nurses and those who believe it is not professional. Likewise, the controversy over whether nurses should strike has been longstanding and continues today. Those who oppose the idea of nurses striking often state that they are abandoning their patients, and that it is not ethical, even though federal legislation requires a 10- day strike notice so that management can make patient care arrangements. The (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Mila A. Aroskar, D. Gay Moldow & Charles M. Good (2004). Nurses' Voices: Policy, Practice and Ethics. Nursing Ethics 11 (3):266-276.score: 36.0
    This article deals with nurses’ ethical concerns raised by the consequences of changes in governmental and institutional policies on nursing practice and patient care. The aims of this project were to explore perspectives of registered nurses who provide or manage direct patient care on policies that affect nursing and patient care, and to provide input to policy makers for the development of more patient-centred policies. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 36 registered nurse participants. The (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gila Yakov, Yehudit Shilo & Tzippy Shor (2010). Nurses' Perceptions of Ethical Issues Related to Patients' Rights Law. Nursing Ethics 17 (4):501-510.score: 36.0
    August 2006 marked the 10th anniversary of landmark legislation when Israel’s parliament passed the unique Patient’s Rights Law. This law underscores the importance of medical ethics in Israeli society. During a seminar at the Shaare Zedek School of Nursing, third-year students performed a qualitative research study investigating ethical issues arising in the field of nursing, and how nursing staff dealt with these issues in relation to the law. The research was conducted using semistructured questionnaires. The results showed (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Micheline Garel, Laurence Caeymaex, François Goffinet, Marina Cuttini & Monique Kaminski (2011). Ethically Complex Decisions in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Impact of the New French Legislation on Attitudes and Practices of Physicians and Nurses. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):240-243.score: 32.0
    Next SectionObjectives A statute enacted in 2005 modified the legislative framework of the rights of terminally ill persons in France. Ten years after the EURONIC study, which described the self-reported practices of neonatal caregivers towards ethical decision-making, a new study was conducted to assess the impact of the new law in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and compare the results reported by EURONIC with current practices. Setting and design The study was carried out in the same two NICU as in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. G. G. van Bruchem-Van De Scheur, A. J. G. V. D. Arend, H. H. Abu-Saad, C. Spreeuwenberg, F. C. B. van Wijmen & R. H. J. Ter Meulen (2008). The Role of Nurses in Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in The Netherlands. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):254-258.score: 30.0
    Background: Issues concerning legislation and regulation with respect to the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide gave the Minister for Health reason to commission a study of the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions in hospitals, home care and nursing homes. Aim: This paper reports the findings of a study of the role of nurses in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, conducted as part of a study of the role of nurses in medical end-of-life decisions. The findings (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. B. Dierckx De Casterle (2006). Nurses' Views on Their Involvement in Euthanasia: A Qualitative Study in Flanders (Belgium). Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):187-192.score: 30.0
    Background: Although nurses worldwide are confronted with euthanasia requests from patients, the views of palliative care nurses on their involvement in euthanasia remain unclear. Objectives: In depth exploration of the views of palliative care nurses on their involvement in the entire care process surrounding euthanasia. Design: A qualitative Grounded Theory strategy was used. Setting and participants: In anticipation of new Belgian legislation on euthanasia, we conducted semistructured interviews with 12 nurses working in a palliative care setting in the province of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. William Ruddick, Death for Doctors.score: 24.0
    Philosophers have simplified brain death issues by drawing two distinctions--that between dead persons and dead bodies or organisms, and that between the concept of definition of death and the criteria for determining when and that death has occurred. The result has been protracted debates as to whether the death of patients is the death of persons or the death of organisms, and whether physicians should use cardio-respiratory criteria, whole brain criteria, or higher brain criteria. Advocates of the death of persons (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. J. McHale, A. Gallagher & I. Mason (2001). The UK Human Rights Act 1998: Implications for Nurses. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):223-233.score: 24.0
    In this article we consider some of the implications of the UK Human Rights Act 1998 for nurses in practice. The Act has implications for all aspects of social life in Britain, particularly for health care. We provide an introduction to the discourse of rights in health care and discuss some aspects of four articles from the Act. The reciprocal relationship between rights and obligations prompted us to consider also the relationship between guidelines in the United Kingdom Central Council’s Code (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Sarah D. Cohn (1983). Survey of Legislation on Third Party Reimbursement for Nurses. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (6):260-263.score: 24.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Vanessa Stadlbauer, Peter Steiner, Martin Schweiger, Michael Sereinigg, Karl-Heinz Tscheliessnigg, Wolfgang Freidl & Philipp Stiegler (2013). Knowledge and Attitude of ICU Nurses, Students and Patients Towards the Austrian Organ Donation Law. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):32.score: 24.0
    A survey on the knowledge and attitudes towards the Austrian organ donation legislation (an opt-out solution) of selected groups of the Austrian population taking into account factors such as age, gender, level of education, affiliation to healthcare professions and health related studies was conducted.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Alexander Diehm & Ingwer Ebsen (2007). The Medical Treatment in Nursing Homes and Plans for a Legislative Reform-Legal Aspects with Particular Reference to Supply of Psycho-Tropic Drugs. Ethik in der Medizin 19 (4):301-312.score: 24.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Beverley Hunt (2004). Recent Equality Legislation in the UK. Nursing Ethics 11 (4):411-413.score: 24.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Barbara L. Neades (2009). Presumed Consent to Organ Donation in Three European Countries. Nursing Ethics 16 (3):267-282.score: 18.0
    United Kingdom Transplant reported that, during 2007—2008, a total of 7655 people were awaiting a transplant; however, only 3235 organs were available via the current `opt in' approach. To address this shortfall, new UK legislation sought to increase the number of organs available for donation. The Chief Medical Officer for England and Wales supports the adoption of `presumed consent' legislation, that is, an `opt out' approach, as used in much of Europe. Little research, however, has explored the impact on bereaved (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jeanne Fitzpatrick (2010). A Better Way of Dying: How to Make the Best Choices at the End of Life. Penguin Books.score: 18.0
    Foreword -- Prologue -- Attorney Eileen Fitzpatrick -- Dr. Jeanne Fitzpatrick -- section 1. Death and dying in America -- 1. The need for change : the cautionary tale of Phyllis Shattuck -- Dr. Fitzpatrick tells Phyllis Shattuck's story -- Reflections -- How this book will help -- Lessons to learn -- New name, old concept -- 2. Your right to die -- Your right to die is born : the case of Karen Ann Quinlan -- The Supreme Court weights (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Allard E. Dembe (2009). Ethical Issues Relating to the Health Effects of Long Working Hours. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S2):195 - 208.score: 12.0
    Considerable research evidence has accumulated indicating that there is an increased likelihood for illness and injury among employees working in long-hour schedules and schedules involving unconventional shift work (e.g., night and evening shifts). In addition, studies show that fatigue-related errors made by employees working in these kind of demanding schedules can have serious and adverse repercussions for public safety. As the result of these concerns, new protective legislation is being advocated in the United States, for instance, to restrict the hours (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Scott Lamont, Yun-Hee Jeon & Mary Chiarella (2013). Health-Care Professionals' Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviours Relating to Patient Capacity to Consent to Treatment An Integrative Review. Nursing Ethics 20 (6):684-707.score: 12.0
    This integrative review aims to provide a synthesis of research findings of health-care professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating to patient capacity to consent to or refuse treatment within the general hospital setting. Search strategies included relevant health databases, hand searching of key journals, ‘snowballing’ and expert recommendations. The review identified various knowledge gaps and attitudinal dispositions of health-care professionals, which influence their behaviours and decision-making in relation to capacity to consent processes. The findings suggest that there is tension between (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. S. Eriksson, G. Helgesson & A. T. Höglund (2007). Being, Doing, and Knowing: Developing Ethical Competence in Health Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):207-216.score: 8.0
    There is a growing interest in ethical competence-building within nursing and health care practising. This tendency is accompanied by a remarkable growth of ethical guidelines. Ethical demands have also been laid down in laws. Present-day practitioners and researchers in health care are thereby left in a virtual cross-fire of various legislations, codes, and recommendations, all intended to guide behaviour. The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of ethical guidelines in the process of ethical competence-building within health (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. A. G. Campbell & H. E. McHaffie (1995). Prolonging Life and Allowing Death: Infants. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (6):339-344.score: 8.0
    Dilemmas about resuscitation and life-prolonging treatment for severely compromised infants have become increasingly complex as skills in neonatal care have developed. Quality of life and resource issues necessarily influence management. Our Institute of Medical Ethics working party, on whose behalf this paper is written, recognises that the ultimate responsibility for the final decision rests with the doctor in clinical charge of the infant. However, we advocate a team approach to decision-making, emphasising the important role of parents and nurses in the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. D. Baird (1975). Induced Abortion: Epidemiological Aspects. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (3):122-126.score: 8.0
    Sir Dugald Baird sketches the history of abortion legislation in Great Britain from the beginning of the century. In his views the 1967 Abortion Act has been one of the most important and beneficial pieces of social legislation enacted in Britain in the last 100 years. It has, however, brought problems both of administration in the hospitals and to individual doctors and nurses, particularly when the patients are young single women and even schoolgirls. One of the consequences of the Abortion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. David A. Buehler, Richard M. Divita & Jackson Joe Yium (1989). Hospital Ethics Committees: The Hospital Attorney's Role. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 1 (4):183-193.score: 8.0
    In light of the foregoing, we conclude that hospital attorneys, risk managers, and other advocates despite the immense contribution which they may make to the process and deliberations of ethics committees—have a unique role in the bioethical decision-making process, but one that neither requires nor precludes membership on such committees. This is not to deny in any way appropriate access to committees or their deliberations by such advocates. Indeed, we would argue strongly that hospital attorneys and risk managers, where there (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Margaret B. Liu (2010). A Clinical Trials Manual From the Duke Clinical Research Institute: Lessons From a Horse Named Jim. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 6.0
    As the_number of clinical trials continues to grow, there is an increasing need for education and training in the field. The clinical research climate is less forgiving of errors and oversights and therefore requires more knowledge of regulations and requirements. This brand new edition details new laws and regulations in protecting children participating in clinical trials and how a new focus on privacy of individual health information in the United States has changed how medical records are handled. Includes a manual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation