Search results for 'Legislation, Nursing' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  10
    Jane Greenlaw (1984). Sermchief V. Gonzales and the Debate Over Advanced Nursing Practice Legislation. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 12 (1):30-31.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Jane Greenlaw (1984). Sermchief V. Gonzales and the Debate Over Advanced Nursing Practice Legislation. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 12 (1):30-31.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  28
    Jean V. McHale (2003). Nursing and Human Rights. Butterworth Heinemann.
    " This book focuses on the relationship between human rights and nursing in these changing times.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. John Tingle & Alan Cribb (1995). Nursing Law and Ethics. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  11
    G. Anderson & M. V. Rorty (2001). Key Points for Developing an International Declaration on Nursing, Human Rights, Human Genetics and Public Health Policy. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):259-271.
    Human rights legislation pertaining to applications of human genetic science is still lacking at an international level. Three international human rights documents now serve as guidelines for countries wishing to develop such legislation. These were drafted and adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Human Genome Organization, and the Council of Europe. It is critically important that the international nursing community makes known its philosophy and practice-based knowledge relating to ethics and human rights, and contributes (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  9
    A. Dreyer, R. Forde & P. Nortvedt (2010). Life-Prolonging Treatment in Nursing Homes: How Do Physicians and Nurses Describe and Justify Their Own Practice? Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (7):396-400.
    Background Making the right decisions, while simultaneously showing respect for patient autonomy, represents a great challenge to nursing home staff in the issues of life-prolonging treatment, hydration, nutrition and hospitalisation to dying patents in end-of-life. Objectives To study how physicians and nurses protect nursing home patients' autonomy in end-of-life decisions, and how they justify their practice. Design A qualitative descriptive design with analysis of the content of transcribed in-depth interviews with physicians and nurses. Participants Nine physicians and ten (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  38
    Margaret Keatings & Diana Dick (1989). Ethics and Politics of Resource Allocation: The Role of Nursing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):187 - 192.
    The use of ethics in everyday nursing practice will become increasingly important to the individual nurse, and nursing as a profession, as technology has a greater impact on health status and the provision of health care. Resource allocation is only one example of an ethical issue in which nursing must have input. Nursing can expand its contribution to society by ensuring that it plays a major role in shaping public policy and legislation. If nursing is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  9
    Judith Hendrick (2004). Law and Ethics. Nelson Thornes.
    Provides an insight into the general principles of the professional-patient relationship.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  2
    Isabela S. C. Velloso & Christine Ceci (2015). Power and Practices: Questions Concerning the Legislation of Health Professions in Brazil. Nursing Philosophy 16 (3):153-160.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  2
    Beverley Hunt (2004). Recent Equality Legislation in the UK. Nursing Ethics 11 (4):411-413.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Petteri Nieminen, Saara Lappalainen, Pauliina Ristimäki, Markku Myllykangas & Anne-Mari Mustonen (2015). Opinions on Conscientious Objection to Induced Abortion Among Finnish Medical and Nursing Students and Professionals. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):17.
    Conscientious objection to participating in induced abortion is not present in the Finnish health care system or legislation unlike in many other European countries.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  15
    Mila A. Aroskar, D. Gay Moldow & Charles M. Good (2004). Nurses' Voices: Policy, Practice and Ethics. Nursing Ethics 11 (3):266-276.
    This article deals with nurses’ ethical concerns raised by the consequences of changes in governmental and institutional policies on nursing practice and patient care. The aims of this project were to explore perspectives of registered nurses who provide or manage direct patient care on policies that affect nursing and patient care, and to provide input to policy makers for the development of more patient-centred policies. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 36 registered nurse participants. The (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  9
    Mari Kangasniemi, Kirsi Viitalähde & Sanna Porkka (2010). A Theoretical Examination of the Rights of Nurses. Nursing Ethics 17 (5):628-635.
    Nurses’ duties and patients’ rights have been important foci in nursing. Nurses’ rights legitimate the power and responsibility of the profession. There are few published articles on this subject in the nursing science literature. This article is a theoretical examination of nurses’ rights that aims to structure (i.e. show the internal logic of) those that have been little studied. It is based on the philosophical literature and published research. Nurses’ rights can be divided into: human and civil rights, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    J. Ketter (1997). Nurses and Strikes: A Perspective From the United States. Nursing Ethics 4 (4):323-329.
    In the United States, there has been a continuous debate between those who favour collective bargaining for nurses and those who believe it is not professional. Likewise, the controversy over whether nurses should strike has been longstanding and continues today. Those who oppose the idea of nurses striking often state that they are abandoning their patients, and that it is not ethical, even though federal legislation requires a 10- day strike notice so that management can make patient care arrangements. The (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  5
    M. Kangasniemi, A. Stievano & A. -M. Pietila (2013). Nurses' Perceptions of Their Professional Rights. Nursing Ethics 20 (4):0969733012466001.
    The purpose of this study, which is part of a wider study of professional ethics, was to describe nurses’ perceptions of their rights in Italy. The data were collected by open-ended focus group interviews and analyzed with inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, three main themes were identified. The first theme “Unfamiliarity with rights” described nurses’ perception that their rights mirrored historical roots, educational content, and nurses’ and patients’ position in the society. The second theme, “Rights reflected in legislation” (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Gila Yakov, Yehudit Shilo & Tzippy Shor (2010). Nurses' Perceptions of Ethical Issues Related to Patients' Rights Law. Nursing Ethics 17 (4):501-510.
    August 2006 marked the 10th anniversary of landmark legislation when Israel’s parliament passed the unique Patient’s Rights Law. This law underscores the importance of medical ethics in Israeli society. During a seminar at the Shaare Zedek School of Nursing, third-year students performed a qualitative research study investigating ethical issues arising in the field of nursing, and how nursing staff dealt with these issues in relation to the law. The research was conducted using semistructured questionnaires. The results showed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Judith Andre (2012). Moral Distress in Nursing Practice in Malawi. Nursing Ethics 19 (March):196-207.
    The aim of this study was to explore the existence of moral distress among nurses in Lilongwe District of Malawi. Qualitative research was conducted in selected health institutions of Lilongwe District in Malawi to assess knowledge and causes of moral distress among nurses and coping mechanisms and sources of support that are used by morally distressed nurses. Data were collected from a purposive sample of 20 nurses through in-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview guide. Thematic analysis of qualitative data was (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  45
    Paula N. Kagan, Marlaine C. Smith, I. I. I. Cowling & Peggy L. Chinn (2010). A Nursing Manifesto: An Emancipatory Call for Knowledge Development, Conscience, and Praxis. Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):67-84.
    The purpose of this paper is to present the theoretical and philosophical assumptions of the Nursing Manifesto , written by three activist scholars whose objective was to promote emancipatory nursing research, practice, and education within the dialogue and praxis of social justice. Inspired by discussions with a number of nurse philosophers at the 2008 Knowledge Conference in Boston, two of the original Manifesto authors and two colleagues discussed the need to explicate emancipatory knowing as it emerged from the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  19.  35
    Trevor Hussey (2009). Nursing and Spirituality. Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):71-80.
    Those matters that are judged to be spiritual are seen as especially valuable and important. For this reason it is claimed that nurses need to be able to offer spiritual care when appropriate and, to aid them in this, nurse theorists have discussed the nature of spirituality. In a recent debate John Paley has argued that nurses should adopt a naturalistic stance which would enable them to employ the insights of modern science. Barbara Pesut has criticized this thesis, especially as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  20.  9
    Jeannette Pols (2013). Washing the Patient: Dignity and Aesthetic Values in Nursing Care. Nursing Philosophy 14 (3):186-200.
    Dignity is a fundamental concept, but its meaning is not clear. This paper attempts to clarify the term by analysing and reconnecting two meanings of dignity: humanitas and dignitas. Humanitas refers to citizen values that protect individuals as equal to one another. Dignitas refers to aesthetic values embedded in genres of sociality that relate to differences between people. The paper explores these values by way of an empirical ethical analysis of practices of washing psychiatric patients in nursing care. Nurses (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  21.  22
    Barbara Pesut (2010). Ontologies of Nursing in an Age of Spiritual Pluralism: Closed or Open Worldview? Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):15-23.
    North American society has undergone a period of sacralization where ideas of spirituality have increasingly been infused into the public domain. This sacralization is particularly evident in the nursing discourse where it is common to find claims about the nature of persons as inherently spiritual, about what a spiritually healthy person looks like and about the environment as spiritually energetic and interconnected. Nursing theoretical thinking has also used claims about the nature of persons, health, and the environment to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  22.  51
    Catherine Green (2009). A Comprehensive Theory of the Human Person From Philosophy and Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):263-274.
    This article explores a problem of the articulation of an adequate account of the human person in both philosophical and nursing theory. It follows the lead of philosopher Norris Clarke in suggesting that there has been a significant division in the way philosophers have looked at the human person and goes on to suggest that this division is paralleled in prominent nursing theories. The paper reviews and argues for the synthesis of two contemporary philosophic theories of the person (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  23.  49
    Louise Racine (2009). Applying Antonio Gramsci's Philosophy to Postcolonial Feminist Social and Political Activism in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):180-190.
    Through its social and political activism goals, postcolonial feminist theoretical approaches not only focus on individual issues that affect health but encompass the examination of the complex interplay between neocolonialism, neoliberalism, and globalization, in mediating the health of non-Western immigrants and refugees. Postcolonial feminism holds the promise to influence nursing research and practice in the 21st century where health remains a goal to achieve and a commitment for humanity. This is especially relevant for nurses, who act as global citizens (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  24.  18
    Stuart Nairn (2009). Social Structure and Nursing Research. Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):191-202.
    The concept of social structure is ill defined in the literature despite the perennial problem and ongoing discussion about the relationship between agency and structure. In this paper I will provide an outline of what the term social structure means, but my main focus will be on emphasizing the value of the concept for nursing research and demonstrate how its erasure in some research negatively effects on our understanding of the nurses' role in clinical practice. For example, qualitative research (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  25.  30
    Jason S. McCready (2010). Jamesian Pragmatism: A Framework for Working Towards Unified Diversity in Nursing Knowledge Development. Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):191-203.
    Nursing is frequently described as practical or pragmatic and there are many parallels between nursing and pragmatism, the school of thought. Pragmatism is often glancingly referenced by nursing authors, but few have conducted in-depth discussions about its applicability to nursing; and few have identified it as a significant theoretical basis for nursing research. William James's pragmatism has not been discussed substantially in the nursing context, despite obvious complementarities. James's theme of pluralism fits with (...)'s diversity and plurality; his emphasis on social conscience in our actions matches nursing's fundamental purpose of improving the lives of others; his continuous testing of pluralistic truths in critically reflective practice pairs well with nursing's focus on developing best-available, holistic evidence; and his conceptualization of truth as being born in practice and becoming an instrument in practice is entirely compatible with nursing's theory–practice identity. The oft-discussed theory–practice gap is seen to hinder the development of nursing knowledge. If nursing is to find its identity in knowledge development and potentiate the knowledge developed, it is imperative to identify and address that which is impeding progress. By way of the pragmatic tenets of William James, I will argue that a significant part of the theory–practice gap lies in how nursing knowledge development is operationalized, creating a false dichotomy between practice and research. I will also argue that the research–practice schism has been widened by continued philosophical and methodological infighting in the research community. I will describe how Jamesian pragmatism can be 'what works' for rebuilding relationships and supporting an engaged plurality within nursing research and bring research and practice together into a collaborative and iterative process of developing nursing knowledge. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26.  18
    Sandra P. Thomas (2005). Through the Lens of Merleau-Ponty: Advancing the Phenomenological Approach to Nursing Research. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):63–76.
    Phenomenology has proved to be a popular methodology for nursing research. I argue, however, that phenomenological nursing research could be strengthened by greater attention to its philosophical underpinnings. Many research reports devote more page space to procedure than to the philosophy that purportedly guided it. The philosophy of Maurice Merleau‐Ponty is an excellent fit for nursing, although his work has received less attention than that of Husserl and Heidegger. In this paper, I examine the life and thought (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  27.  20
    A. S. Burston & A. G. Tuckett (2013). Moral Distress in Nursing: Contributing Factors, Outcomes and Interventions. Nursing Ethics 20 (3):312-324.
    Moral distress has been widely reviewed across many care contexts and among a range of disciplines. Interest in this area has produced a plethora of studies, commentary and critique. An overview of the literature around moral distress reveals a commonality about factors contributing to moral distress, the attendant outcomes of this distress and a core set of interventions recommended to address these. Interventions at both personal and organizational levels have been proposed. The relevance of this overview resides in the implications (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  19
    Sandy Isaacs, Jenny Ploeg & Catherine Tompkins (2009). How Can Rorty Help Nursing Science in the Development of a Philosophical 'Foundation'? Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):81-90.
    What can nurse scientists learn from Rorty in the development of a philosophical foundation? Indeed, Rorty in his 1989 text entitled Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity tantalizes the reader with debates of reason 'against' philosophizing. Forget truth seeking; move on to what matters. Rorty would rather the 'high brow' thinking go to those that do the work in order to make the effort useful. Nursing as an applied science, has something real that is worth looking at, and that nurse researchers (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  29.  9
    Martin Lipscomb (2011). Challenging the Coherence of Social Justice as a Shared Nursing Value. Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):4-11.
    Normative and prescriptive claims regarding social justice are often inadequately developed in the nursing literature and, in consequence, they must be rejected in their current form. Thus, claims regarding social justice are frequently presented as mere assertion or, alternatively, when assertions are supported that support may be weak . This paper challenges the coherence of social justice as a shared nursing value and it is suggested that claims regarding the concept should be tempered.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  10
    Alicia M. Evans, David A. Pereira & Judith M. Parker (2008). Occupational Distress in Nursing: A Psychoanalytic Reading of the Literature. Nursing Philosophy 9 (3):195-204.
    Abstract Occupational stress in nursing has attracted considerable attention as a focus for research and as a consequence multiple objects of nurses' stress, or 'stressors', have been identified. This paper puts into question the dominant conceptual and methodological approach to occupational stress in nursing research by both foregrounding the notion of anxiety and juxtaposing it with the notion of 'stress'. It is argued that the notion of 'stress' and the domination of the questionnaire have produced a narrow reading (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  31.  32
    Alan Barnard (2002). Philosophy of Technology and Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 3 (1):15–26.
    This paper outlines the background and significance of philosophy of technology as a focus of inquiry emerging within nursing scholarship and research. The thesis of the paper is that philosophy of technology and nursing is fundamental to discipline development and our role in enhancing health care. It is argued that we must further our responsibility and interest in critiquing current and future health care systems through philosophical inquiry into the experience, meaning and implications of technology. This paper locates (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32.  27
    Nancy J. Crigger (2009). Towards Understanding the Nature of Conflict of Interest and its Application to the Discipline of Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):253-262.
    Most incidences of dishonesty in research, financial investments that promote personal financial gain, and kickback scandals begin as conflicts of interest (COI). Research indicates that healthcare professionals who maintain COI relationships make less optimal and more expensive patient care choices. The discovery of COI relationships also negatively impact patient and public trust. Many disciplines are addressing this professional issue, but little work has been done towards understanding and applying this moral category within a nursing context. Do COIs occur in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  15
    Mandy M. Archibald (2012). The Holism of Aesthetic Knowing in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 13 (3):179-188.
    In 1978, Carper identified ‘four fundamental patterns of knowing’ that became largely foundational to subsequent epistemological discourse within the nursing discipline. These patterns of empirical, personal, aesthetic, and ethical knowing were presented as conceptually distinct yet related patterns of knowing. In order to provide an alternative conceptualization of aesthetics in nursing, the main tenants of Carper's discussion of aesthetic knowing will be revisited, and the foundations for her arguments will be examined. Specifically, Dewey's Art as Experience will be (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  4
    Martin Lipscomb (2006). Rebutting the Suggestion That Anthony Giddens's Structuration Theory Offers a Useful Framework for Sociological Nursing Research: A Critique Based Upon Margaret Archer's Realist Social Theory. Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):175-180.
    A recent paper in this journal by Hardcastle et al. in 2005 argued that Anthony Giddens’s Structuration Theory might usefully inform sociological nursing research. In response, a critique of ST based upon the Realist Social Theory of Margaret Archer is presented. Archer maintains that ST is fatally flawed and, in consequence, it has little to offer nursing research. Following an analysis of the concepts epiphenomenalism and elisionism, it is suggested that emergentist Realist Social Theory captures or describes a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  34
    Peter Allmark (2003). Popper and Nursing Theory. Nursing Philosophy 4 (1):4-16.
    Science seems to develop by inducing new knowledge from observation. However, it is hard to find a rational justification for induction. Popper offers one attempt to resolve this problem. Nursing theorists have tended to ignore or reject Popper, often on the false belief that he is a logical positivist (and hence hostile to qualitative research). Logical positivism claims that meaningful sentences containing any empirical content should ultimately be reducible to simple, observation statements. Popper refutes positivism by showing that there (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  13
    Carolyn A. Laabs (2008). The Community of Nursing: Moral Friends, Moral Strangers, Moral Family. Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):225-232.
    Abstract Unlike bioethicists who contend that there is a morality common to all, H. Tristan Engelhardt (1996) argues that, in a pluralistic secular society, any morality that does exist is loosely connected, lacks substantive moral content, is based on the principle of permission and, thus, is a morality between moral strangers. This, says Engelhardt, stands in contrast to a substance-full morality that exists between moral friends, a morality in which moral content is based on shared beliefs and values and exists (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  37.  29
    Martha Mackay (2009). Why Nursing has Not Embraced the Clinician–Scientist Role. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):287-296.
    Reasons for the limited uptake of the clinician–scientist role within nursing are examined, specifically: the lack of consensus about the nature of nursing science; the varying approaches to epistemology; and the influence of post-modern thought on knowledge development in nursing. It is suggested that under-development of this role may be remedied by achieving agreement that science is a necessary, worthy pursuit for nursing, and that rigorous science conducted from a clinical perspective serves nursing well. Straddling (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  28
    Ingunn Elstad & Kirsti Torjuul (2009). The Issue of Life: Aristotle in Nursing Perspective. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):275-286.
    This paper explores the issue of life and its relevance to nursing, through Aristotle's philosophy and an Aristotelian interpretation of Nightingale's Notes on Nursing . Life as process and becoming has ontological status in Aristotle's philosophy and this dynamism is particularly relevant for nursing. The paper presents aspects of Aristotle's philosophy of life: his account of life as inherent powers of the individual, his analysis of change and time, and his understanding of sickness and health as qualitative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  14
    Joan McCarthy (2010). Moral Instability: The Upsides for Nursing Practice. Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):127-135.
    This article briefly outlines some of the key problems with the way in which the moral realm has traditionally been understood and analysed. I propose two alternative views of what is morally interesting and applicable to nursing practice and I indicate that instability has its upsides. I begin with a moral tale – a 'Good Samaritan' story – which raises fairly usual questions about the nature of morality but also the more philosophically fundamental question about the relationship between subjectivity (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  22
    Sandra Mackey (2009). Towards an Ontological Theory of Wellness: A Discussion of Conceptual Foundations and Implications for Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):103-112.
    In this article a discussion of the phenomenon of wellness and its relevance to contemporary nursing practice is developed. Drawing on phenomenology, the research literature and the author's own wellness research, an exposition of the concept of wellness is presented. It is proposed that the experience of being well is lived as a continuity of time and that it involves both a taking-for-granted of the body and containment of the horizon of concern. The state of actually being well is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  19
    Ingunn Elstad & Kirsti Torjuul (2009). Continuity of Nursing and the Time of Sickness. Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):91-102.
    This paper explores the relationship between temporal continuity in nursing and temporal features of sickness. It is based on phenomenological and hermeneutical philosophy, empirical studies of sickness time, and the nursing theories of Nightingale, of Benner and of Benner and Wrubel. In the first part, temporal continuity is defined as distinct from interpersonal continuity. Tensions between temporal continuity and discontinuity are discussed in the contexts of care management, of conceptualisations of disease and of time itself. Temporal limitations to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  9
    Martin Lipscomb (2010). Events and Event Identity: Under-Explored Topics in Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 11 (2):88-99.
    Theoretic interest in the nature of events and event identity is apparent across a wide range of fields. However, this interest has not yet made itself known in nursing. In this paper, it is asserted that nurse theoreticians and researchers should consider the problematic of events and event identity. It is suggested that engagement with these issues is important because the manner in which this component of explanation is integrated into argument has concrete implications for our understanding of healthcare (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  4
    Brenda L. Cameron (2006). Towards Understanding the Unpresentable in Nursing: Some Nursing Philosophical Considerations. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):23-35.
    While nursing practice embodies certain observable and sometimes habitual actions, much inheres in these actions that is not immediately discernible. Taking on Lyotard's exegesis of the unpresentable, I undertake an analysis of the unpresentable as it occurs in nursing practices. The unpresentable is a place of alterity often excluded from dominant discourses. Yet this very alterity is what practising nurses face day after day. Drawing from two nursing situations, one from a hermeneutic phenomenological study and the other (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  26
    Kathryn Weaver & Carl Mitcham (2008). Nursing Concept Analysis in North America: State of the Art. Nursing Philosophy 9 (3):180-194.
    Abstract The strength of a discipline is reflected in the development of a set of concepts relevant to its practice domain. As an evolving professional discipline, nursing requires further development in this respect. Over the past two decades in North America there have emerged three different approaches to concept analysis in nursing scholarship: Wilsonian-derived, evolutionary, and pragmatic utility. The present paper compares and contrasts these three methods of concept in terms of purpose, procedures, philosophical underpinnings, limitations, guidance for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  13
    Martin Woods (2012). Exploring the Relevance of Social Justice Within a Relational Nursing Ethic. Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):56-65.
    Abstract In the last few decades, a growing number of commentators have questioned the appropriateness of the 'justice view' of ethics as a suitable approach in health care ethics, and most certainly in nursing. Essentially, in their ethical deliberations, it is argued that nurses do not readily adopt the high degree of impartiality and objectivity that is associated with a justice view; instead their moral practices are more accurately reflected through the use of alternative approaches such as relational or (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  13
    Marjorie C. Dobratz (2010). A Model of Consensus Formation for Reconciling Nursing's Disciplinary Matrix. Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):53-66.
    With questions raised as to whether or not nursing knowledge should be developed from extant conceptual/theoretical models or from practice-based environments, this paper utilizes Kuhn's disciplinary matrix and Laudan's model of consensus formation to explore the changing nature of the discipline's structural matrix. Kuhn's notion that a discipline's structural matrix includes symbolic generalizations, models and exemplars, and Laudan's view that a maturing discipline embraces factual, methodological, and axiological (goals and aims) knowledge, and that context and discourse are also involved (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    Lene L. Berring, Liselotte Pedersen & Niels Buus (2015). Discourses of Aggression in Forensic Mental Health: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Mental Health Nursing Staff Records. Nursing Inquiry 22 (4):296-305.
    Managing aggression in mental health hospitals is an important and challenging task for clinical nursing staff. A majority of studies focus on the perspective of clinicians, and research mainly depicts aggression by referring to patient-related factors. This qualitative study investigates how aggression is communicated in forensic mental health nursing records. The aim of the study was to gain insight into the discursive practices used by forensic mental health nursing staff when they record observed aggressive incidents. Textual accounts (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Mark W. Risjord (2010). Nursing Knowledge: Science, Practice, and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell Pub..
    The final chapter of the book 'redraws the map', to create a new picture of nursing science based on the following principles: Problems of practice should guide ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  49.  28
    Jeremy Waldron (1999). The Dignity of Legislation. Cambridge University Press.
    0n a lucid, concise volume, Jeremy Waldron defends the role of legislation, presenting it as an important mode of governance. Aristotle, Locke and Kant emerge as proponents of the dignity of legislation. Waldron's arguments are of obvious importance and topicality, especially in countries that are considering the introduction of a Bill of Rights. The Dignity of Legislation is original in conception, trenchantly argued and very clearly presented, and will be of interest to a wide range of scholars and thinkers.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  50.  23
    M. A. Paley (2008). Spirituality and Nursing: A Reductionist Approach. Nursing Philosophy 9 (1):3–18.
1 — 50 / 1000