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Profile: Lena Halldenius (Lund University)
  1. Lena Halldenius, Maeve Cooke, Lilian Alweiss, John Erik Fossum, Bruce Haddock & Julia Stapleton (2003). Contributors. European Journal of Political Theory 2 (3):259-260.
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  2. Gustaf Arrhenius, Ingar Brinck, Kathrin Glüer-Pagin, Lena Halldenius, Anna-Sofia Maurin, Folke Tersman & Åsa Wikforss (2011). To the Editor of Theoria. Theoria 77 (3):198-198.
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  3.  9
    Lena Halldenius, Mary Wollstonecraft and Freedom as Independence.
    Halldenius argues that we should regard Mary Wollstonecraft as a feminist republican, drawing out the implications of reading her in that way for the meaning and role of freedom in Wollstonecraft’s philosophy. Her republicanism directs our attention to the fact that freedom for Wollstonecraft is conceptualized in terms of independence, importantly in two analytically distinct yet heavily interdependent ways. There is a long philosophical tradition of treating moral freedom as an internal phenomenon, as an aspect of freedom of the will. (...)
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  4.  8
    Lena Halldenius, On the Use and Abuse of History in Philosophy of Human Rights.
    History plays an important role in the philosophy of human rights, more so than in philosophical discussions on related concepts, such as justice. History tends to be used in order to make it credible that there is a tradition of rights as a moral idea, or an ethical ideal, that transcends national boundaries. In the example that I investigate in this chapter, this moral idea is tightly spun around the moral dignity of the human person. There has been a shift (...)
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  5.  47
    Lena Halldenius (2007). The Primacy of Right. On the Triad of Liberty, Equality and Virtue in Wollstonecraft's Political Thought. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):75 – 99.
  6.  5
    Lena Halldenius, Representation in Mary Wollstonecraft’s Political Philosophy.
    For Mary Wollstonecraft, the moral purpose of government is to act on the principle of equality and protect the weak against the fact of inequality. The political day-to-day is characterized by classes and groups with competing interests, some more powerful than others. Wollstonecraft was a republican thinker and so it is reasonable to expect in her writings a notion of political society as representative, but how? After placing Wollstonecraft in relation to contemporary republicanism, we can see that Wollstonecraft’s notion of (...)
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  7.  21
    Lena Halldenius (2005). Dissecting “Discrimination”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (4):455-463.
    edited by Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry, welcomes contributions on the conceptual and theoretical dimensions of bioethics.
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  8.  32
    Lena Halldenius (2011). Kant on Freedom and Obligation Under Law. Constellations 18 (2):170-189.
  9.  38
    Lena Halldenius (1998). Non-Domination and Egalitarian Welfare Politics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3):335-353.
    In this article I will do three things: I will argue that solidarity is not necessary for political legitimacy, that non-domination is a strong candidate for legitimacy criterion, and, finally, that non-domination can legitimate the egalitarian welfare state.
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  10.  9
    Lena Halldenius (2014). Mary Wollstonecraft's Feminist Critique of Property: On Becoming a Thief From Principle. Hypatia 29 (4):942-957.
    The scholarship on Mary Wollstonecraft is divided concerning her views on women's role in public life, property rights, and distribution of wealth. Her critique of inequality of wealth is undisputed, but is it a complaint only of inequality or does it strike more forcefully at the institution of property? The argument in this article is that Wollstonecraft's feminism is partly defined by a radical critique of property, intertwined with her conception of rights. Dissociating herself from the conceptualization of rights in (...)
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  11.  10
    Lena Halldenius (2012). Liberty, Law and Leviathan: Of Being Free From Impediments by Artifice. Theoria 59 (131):1-20.
    The argument in this article is that Hobbes' theory of freedom in Leviathan allows for four ways of being free to act - corporal freedom by nature, freedom from obligation by nature, the freedom to disobey and the freedom of no-rule - each corresponding to a particular absence, some of which make sense only in the civil state. Contrary to what some have claimed, this complexity does not commit Hobbes to an unarticulated definition of freedom in tension with the only (...)
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  12.  5
    Martina Reuter, Lena Halldenius & Alan Coffee (2014). Cluster Introduction: Mary Wollstonecraft: Philosophy and Enlightenment. Hypatia 29 (4):906-907.
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  13.  4
    Daniel Callahan, Larry R. Churchill, Denise M. Dudzinski, Carl Elliott, Joseph J. Fins, Renée C. Fox, Michael L. Gross, Lena Halldenius, Matti Häyry & Kenneth V. Iserson (2005). Bette Anton, MLS, is Head Librarian for the Pamela & Kenneth Fong Optometry & Health Sciences Library of the University of California, Berkeley. This Library Serves the UC Berkeley School of Optometry and the UC Berkeley–UC San Francisco Joint Medical Program. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14:355-356.
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  14.  4
    Lena Halldenius (2003). Locke and the Non-Arbitrary. European Journal of Political Theory 2 (3):261-279.
    In this article, John Locke's accounts of political liberty and legitimate government are read as expressions of a normative demand for non-arbitrariness. I argue that Locke locates infringements of political liberty in dependence on the arbitrary will of another, whether or not interference or restraint actually takes place. This way Locke is tentatively placed in that tradition of republican thought recently brought to our attention by Pettit, Skinner and others. This reading shifts the focus on legitimacy and identifies the independent (...)
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  15.  8
    Lena Halldenius (2009). Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):453-456.
    "The introduction of Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy provides a useful overview of the subject, while the chronology runs the gamut from ancient Greek to contemporary feminist philosophers. Dictionary entries cover both the central figures and ideas from the historical tradition of philosophy, as well as ideas and theories from contemporary feminist philosophy, such as epistemology and topics like abortion and sexuality. In addition to including entries on Aristotle, Plato, Descartes, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Beauvoir, and Daly, relevant aspects of other fields (...)
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  16. Lena Halldenius (2003). Diane Ravitch and Joseph P. Viteritti, Eds., Making Good Citizens. Education and Civil Society Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (3):210-212.
     
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  17.  3
    Lena Halldenius (2007). Liberty, Law and Social Construction. History of Political Thought 28 (4):697-708.
    In this article Hobbes's view of the commonwealth, and of law and liberty within it, is discussed from the point of view of social ontology. The artificial character of the commonwealth and the constitutive function of the covenant is put in terms of the institutional world being constructed through collective intentionality, which is performative, self-referential, and collective, and which serves as truth-maker. Hobbes is used here to make the point that it is a mistake to argue, as for example Tuomela (...)
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  18. Lena Halldenius (2004). Arvet från Kants politiska teori. Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 4.
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  19. Lena Halldenius (2010). Building Blocks of a Republican Cosmopolitanism The Modality of Being Free. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (1):12-30.
    A structural affinity between republican freedom as non-domination and human rights claims accounts for the relevance of republicanism for cosmopolitan concerns. Central features of republican freedom are its institution dependence and the modal aspect it adds to being free. Its chief concern is not constraint, but the way in which an agent is constrained or not. To the extent I am vulnerable to someone’s dispositional power over me I am not free, even if I am not in fact constrained. Republican (...)
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  20. Lena Halldenius (2009). Liberty and its Circumstances : A Functional Approach. In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  21. Lena Halldenius, Liberty Revisited. A Historical and Systematic Account of an Egalitarian Conception of Liberty and Legitimacy.
    This dissertation argues for an interpretation of liberty in terms of non-domination rather than non-interference, that non-domination can work as an independent criterion of political legitimacy, and that non-domination includes an approximation of equality in socioeconomic goods. In the first part, four theories of liberty and power – those of Kant, Locke, J. S. Mill and H. Taylor, and Wollstonecraft – are analyzed. It is concluded that Locke and Wollstonecraft, and Mill and Taylor partly, but not Kant, offer non-domination oriented (...)
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