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Profile: Lenny Moss (University of Exeter)
  1. Lenny Moss (2014). Detachment and Compensation Groundwork for a Metaphysics of 'Biosocial Becoming'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (1):91-105.
    There are many in the social sciences and social philosophy who would aspire to overcome the ‘nature/culture binary’, including some who, with at least an implicit nod toward a putatively ‘anti-essentialist’ process ontology, have set out with an orientation toward a paradigm of ‘biosocial becoming’ (Ingold and Palsson, 2013). Such contemporary work, however, in areas such as social and cultural anthropology and sciences studies has often failed to clarify, let alone justify, the warrants of their most basic assumptions and assertions. (...)
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  2. Lenny Moss (2012). Is the Philosophy of Mechanism Philosophy Enough? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):164-172.
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  3. Lenny Moss & Daniel J. Nicholson (2012). On Nature and Normativity: Normativity, Teleology, and Mechanism in Biological Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):88-91.
  4. Lenny Moss (2007). From Describing to Performing the Socioethical Engagement with Systems Biology. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):86-87.
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  5. Lenny Moss (2006). Advances in Genomics and Its Conceptual Implications for Development and Evolution-Redundancy, Plasticity, and Detachment: The Implications of Comparative Genomics for Evolutionary, Thinking. In Borchert (ed.), Philosophy of Science. Macmillan. 73--5.
     
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  6. Lenny Moss (2006). Redundancy, Plasticity, and Detachment: The Implications of Comparative Genomics for Evolutionary Thinking. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):930-946.
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  7. Lenny Moss (2006). The Question of Questions: What is a Gene? Comments on Rolston and Griffths & Stotz. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (6):523-534.
    If the question ``What is a gene?'' proves to be worth asking it must be able to elicit an answer which both recognizes and address the reasons why the concept of the gene ever seemed to be something worth getting excited about in the first place as well analyzing and evaluating the latest develops in the molecular biology of DNA. Each of the preceding papers fails to do one of these and sufferrs the consequences. Where Rolston responds to the apparent (...)
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  8. Lenny Moss (2004). Commentary on Falk and Downes. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (1):123 - 129.
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  9. Lenny Moss (2001). The Gene-for Confusion. The Philosophers' Magazine 13 (13):46-47.
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  10. Lenny Moss (1995). Genes and Generalizations: Darden's Strategies and the Question of Context. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 10 (4):483-488.
    In her recent book Lindley Darden has endeavored to reclaim for philosophy an active role in the elaboration of good science. She has done this, not by holding up some set of rational standards derived from outside of scientific practice, but rather by delving into the history of science and coming out with a set of scientific strategies. Unconcerned about whether any particular strategy wasin fact employed in a given historical case her project depends upon two claims, first that these (...)
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  11. Lenny Moss (1992). A Kernel of Truth? On the Reality of the Genetic Program. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:335 - 348.
    The existence claim of a "genetic program" encoded in the DNA molecule which controls biological processes such as development has been examined. Sources of belief in such an entity are found in the rhetoric of Mendelian genetics, in the informationist speculations of Schrodinger and Delbruck, and in the instrumental efficacy found in the use of certain viral, and molecular genetic techniques. In examining specific research models, it is found that attempts at tracking the source of biological control always leads back (...)
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  12. Lenny Moss (1990). Ethical Expertise and Moral Maturity: Conflict or Complement? Philosophy and Social Criticism 16 (3):227-235.
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