Search results for 'Leo Clark' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  36
    Susan R. Martyn, Richard Wright & Leo Clark (1988). Required Request for Organ Donation: Moral, Clinical, and Legal Problems. Hastings Center Report 18 (2):27-34.
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  2.  2
    Tom Moore, David Alpren, Susan Martyn, Richard Wright & Leo Clark (1989). Required Request Revisited. Hastings Center Report 19 (2):44-45.
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  3.  6
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty Evidentialism and its Discontents_ . Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0. Clark & VanArragon _Evidence and Religious Belief . Pp. X + 214. £35.00 , £24.94 . ISBN 9780 19 960371 8. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies, FirstView Article.
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  4.  1
    Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty Evidentialism and its Discontents_ . Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0. Clark & VanArragon _Evidence and Religious Belief . Pp. X + 214. £35.00 , £24.94 . ISBN 9780 19 960371 8. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies, FirstView Article.
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  5. Andy Clark (2006). Andy Clark Cognitive Complexity and the Sensorimotor Frontier. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):43–65.
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  6.  3
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Sexual Ontology and Group Marriage: Stephen R. L. Clark. Philosophy 58 (224):215-227.
    Philosophers of earlier ages have usually spent time in considering thenature of marital, and in general familial, duty. Paley devotes an entire book to those ‘relative duties which result from the constitution of the sexes’,1 a book notable on the one hand for its humanity and on the other for Paley‘s strange refusal to acknowledge that the evils for which he condemns any breach of pure monogamy are in large part the result of the fact that such breaches are generally (...)
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  7. Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Orwell and the Anti-Realists: Stephen R. L. Clark. Philosophy 67 (260):141-154.
    The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible.
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  8.  5
    Colin Clark (1978). Colin Clark Replies to Peter Hunt. The Chesterton Review 4 (2):181-183.
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  9. Michael Clark (1969). Discourse About the Future: Michael Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 3:169-190.
    While philosophers feel relatively comfortable about talking of the present and the past, some of them feel uncomfortable about talking in just the same way of future events. They feel that, in general, discourse about the future differs significantly from discourse about the past and present, and that these differences reflect a logical asymmetry between the past and future beyond the merely defining fact that the future succeeds, and the past precedes, the present time. The problem is: how can we (...)
     
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  10. Stephen R. L. Clark (1991). How Many Selves Make Me?1: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:213-233.
    Cartesian accounts of the mental make it axiomatic that consciousness is transparent: what I feel, I know I feel, however many errors I may make about its cause. ‘I’ names a simple, unextended, irreducible substance, created ex nihilo or eternally existent, and only associated with the complete, extended, dissoluble substance or pretend-substance that is ‘my’ body by divine fiat. Good moderns take it for granted that ‘we’ now realize how shifting, foggy and deconstructible are the boundaries of the self; ‘we’ (...)
     
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  11. Philip Clark, Mackie's Motivational Argument Philip Clark.
    Mackie doubted anything objective could have the motivational properties of a value. In thinking we are morally required to act in a certain way, he said, we attribute objective value to the action. Since nothing has objective value, these moral judgments are all false. As to whether Mackie proved his error theory, opinions vary. But there is broad agreement on one issue. A litany of examples, ranging from amoralism to depression to downright evil, has everyone convinced that Mackie vastly overstated (...)
     
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  12. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). The Better Part: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 35:29-49.
    According to Aristotle, the goal of anyone who is not simply stupid or slavish is to live a worthwhile life. There are, no doubt, people who have no goal at all beyond the moment's pleasure or release from pain. There may be people incapable of reaching any reasoned decision about what to do, and acting on it. But anyone who asks how she should live implicitly agrees that her goal is to live well, to live a life that she can (...)
     
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  13.  1
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). World Religions and World Orders: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK. Religious Studies 26 (1):43-57.
    There are good reasons for being suspicious of the very concept of ‘a religion’, let alone a ‘world religion’. It may be useful for a hospital administrator to know a patient's ‘religion’ – as Protestant or Church of England or Catholic or Buddhist – but such labels clearly do little more than identify the most suitable chaplain, and connote groupings in the vast and confusing region of ‘religious thought and practice’ that are of very different ranks. By any rational, genealogical (...)
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  14.  1
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Where Have All the Angels Gone?1: STEPHEN R. L. CLARK. Religious Studies 28 (2):221-234.
    Anyone who wishes to talk about angels has to respond to the mocking question, how many of them can dance on the point of a pin. The answer is: ‘just as many as they please’. Angels being immaterial intellects do not occupy space to the exclusion of any other such intellectual substance, and their being ‘on’ the point of a pin can only mean that they attend to it. The question, however, is not one that concerned our mediaeval predecessors, although (...)
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  15.  2
    Gilbert Clark & Enid Zimmerman (forthcoming). The Influence of Theoretical Frameworks on Clark and Zimmerman's Research About Art Talent Development. Journal of Aesthetic Education 31 (4).
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  16. George Barton & Herbert Clark (1906). Three Objects in the Collection of Herbert Clark, of Jerusalem. Journal of the American Oriental Society 27:400-401.
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  17. Stephen R. L. Clark (1987). Abstract Morality, Concrete Cases: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:35-53.
    Practitioners of disciplines whose problems are debated by moral philosophers regularly complain that the philosophers are engaged in abstract speculation, divorced from ‘real-life’ consequences and responsibilities, that it is the practitioners who must take the decisions, and that they cannot act in accordance with strict abstract logic.
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  18. Stephen R. L. Clark (1992). Descartes' Debt to Augustine: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:73-88.
    Jonathan Edwards identified the central act of faith as ‘the cordial consent of beings to Being in general’, which is to say to God . That equation, of Being, Truth and God, is rarely taken seriously in analytical circles. My argument will be that this is to neglect the real context of a great deal of past philosophy, particularly the very Cartesian arguments from which so many undergraduate courses begin. All too many students issue from such courses immunized against enthusiasm, (...)
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  19. J. Reuben Clark & David H. Yarn (1987). J. Reuben Clark.
     
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  20. Stephen Clark (1996). La Contribution de Stephen Clark À la Philosophie Sur Internet. Horizons Philosophiques 6 (2):95.
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  21. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). The Limits of Explanation: Limited Explanations: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:195-210.
    When I was first approached to read a paper at the conference from which this volume takes its beginning I expected that Flint Schier, with whom I had taught a course on the Philosophy of Biology in my years at Glasgow, would be with us to comment and to criticize. I cannot let this occasion pass without expressing once again my own sense of loss. I am sure that we would all have gained by his presence, and hope that he (...)
     
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  22. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). Tools, Machines and Marvels: Stephen R. L. Clark. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 38:159-176.
    Technology, according to Derry and Williams's Short History , ‘comprises all that bewilderingly varied body of knowledge and devices by which man progressively masters his natural environment’. Their casual, and unconscious, sexism is not unrelated to my present topic. Women enter the story as spinners, burden bearers and, at long last, typists. ‘The tying of a bundle on the back or the dragging of it along upon the outspread twigs of a convenient branch are contributions [and by implication the only (...)
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  23. George Clark (1980). Howell D. Chickering Jr., Ed. And Trans., Beowulf. A Dual-Language Edition. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Press, 1977. Paper. Pp. Xiii, 390. $4.95. T. A. Shippey, Beowulf. London: Edward Arnold, 1978. Pp. 64. £3.95 ; £1.95 . Henry Sweet, A Second Anglo-Saxon Reader: Archaic and Dialectal. Second Edition, Revised by T. F. Hoad. Oxford, Eng.: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 1978. Pp. Xii, 237. $18.50 ; £4.95 . First Published in 1887. George Clark. [REVIEW] Speculum 55 (4):779-783.
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  24. Werner Leo (1920). Leo, Werner, Diderot Als Kunstphilosoph. Kant-Studien 24 (1).
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  25. Patrick Madigan (2016). Israel and Empire: A Postcolonial History of Israel and Early Judaism. By Leo G. Perdue and Warren Carter ; Edited by Coleman A. Baker. Pp. X, 328, London/NY, T&T Clark, 2014, £24.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 57 (1):202-203.
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  26.  2
    Clark Butler, Review of the Book Hegel and the Human Spirit A Translation of the Jena Lectures on the Philosophy of Spirit (1805–06) with Commentary by Leo Rauch. [REVIEW]
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  27.  99
    Mohan P. Matthen (2004). Features, Places, and Things: Reflections on Austen Clark's Theory of Sentience. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):497-518.
    The paper argues that material objects are the primary referents of visual states -- not places, as Austen Clark would have it in his A Theory of Sentience.
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  28. Nikolay Milkov (2004). Leo Tolstois Darlegung des Evangelium und seine theologisch-philosophische Ethik. Perspektiven der Philosophie 30:311-333.
    The paper discusses Leo Tolstoy's philosophy as developed in his works 'A Synoptic Presentation of the Four Gospels' and 'The Gospel in Brief'. Tolstoy considered Christian religion not as a belief but as an ethical doctrine about how to live, so that our life does not lose its meaning when confronted with the death. Jesus' doctrine teaches that we must lead our life following our spirit, not our flesh. This means that we must strive to understand other persons and to (...)
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  29.  62
    Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Review of Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick, The Soul of Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil. [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    This is a contribution to a symposium on Clark and Dudrick’s The Soul of Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil. I focus on three aspects of their book. First, I critique Clark and Dudrick’s claim that Nietzsche recognizes a discrete “will to value.” Second, I argue that Clark and Dudrick’s reading of Nietzschean drives (Triebe) as homunculi is indefensible. Third, I raise questions about their claim that Nietzsche understands the self as a “normative ordering” of drives, which they (...)
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  30.  10
    Ross Feehan (2014). Thinking About Earth, 20 Years Later: Reconsidering Stephen Clark's Ecological Theology. Journal of Animal Ethics 4 (2):93-98,.
    This review commemorates the 20th anniversary of Stephen Clark’s explication of ecological thought. After appraising both philosophical and theological perspectives, Clark argues that society must awaken to Earth’s “Otherness.” I describe Clark’s ecological consciousness and highlight the significance of his book for 21st-century readers.
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  31.  23
    Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  32.  9
    Manuel García-Carpintero (1995). The Philosophical Import of Connectionism: A Critical Notice of Andy Clark's Associative Engines. Mind and Language 10 (4):370-401.
    Critical notice of Andy Clark's "Associative Engines".
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  33.  18
    Laurence Lampert (1996). Leo Strauss and Nietzsche. University of Chicago Press.
    The influential political philosopher Leo Strauss has been credited by conservatives with the recovery of the great tradition of political philosophy stretching back to Plato. Among Strauss's most enduring legacies is a strongly negative assessment of Nietzsche as the modern philosopher most at odds with that tradition and most responsible for the sins of twentieth-century culture--relativism, godlessness, nihilism, and the breakdown of family values. In fact, this apparent denunciation has become so closely associated with Strauss that it is often seen (...)
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  34.  28
    Matthew Sharpe (2011). 'In the Court of a Great King': Some Remarks on Leo Strauss' Introduction to the Guide for the Perplexed. Sophia 50 (1):141-158.
    This essay, which will be divided between two SOPHIA editions, proposes to test the consensus in Maimonidean scholarship on the alleged intellectualism of Leo Strauss’ Maimonides by making a close interpretive study of Strauss’ 1963 essay ‘How to Begin to Study the Guide for the Perplexed’. While the importance of this essay, which is Strauss’ last extended piece on the Guide, is established in Maimonidean scholarship, its recognised esotericism has been matched by a dearth of detailed studies of the piece. (...)
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  35.  35
    Georges Rey (2004). A Deflated Intentionalist Alternative to Clark's Unexplanatory Metaphysics. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):519-540.
    Throughout his discussion, Clark speaks constantly of phenomenal and qualitative properties. But properties, like any other posited entities, ought to earn their explanatory keep, and this I don't think Clark's phenomenal or qualitative properties actually do. I argue that all the work he enlists for them could be done better by purely intentional contents of our sentient states; that is, they could better be regarded as mere intentional properties, not real ones. Clark eschews such intentionalism, but I (...)
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  36.  22
    Evan Selinger & Timothy Engström (2008). Interactive Computation is Interaction with What?: A Reply to Clark. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):347-348.
    In this response essay, we argue that Andy Clark’s assessment of our position on cyborgs is rooted in a misconception of the notion of “interaction” that we advance.
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  37.  5
    José Daniel Parra Quintero (2010). Between Carl Schmitt and Thomas Hobbes: A Study of Modern Liberalism From Leo Strauss' Thought. [Spanish]. Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 12:48-86.
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This essay presents a reading of modern liberalism from Leo Strauss´thought. Starting with his analysis of Carl Schmitt’s Concept of the Political and its critique of liberal “neutralization and depolitization”, Strauss posits an affirmation of (...)
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  38. Leo Apostel, F. Vandamme, R. Pinxten, Fernand J. Vandamme & Ingrid Van Dorren (1989). The Philosophy of Leo Apostel.
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  39. Peter Emberley & Barry Cooper (eds.) (1993). Faith and Political Philosophy: The Correspondence Between Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin, 1934-1964. Penn State University Press.
    Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin were political theorists of the first rank whose impact on the study of political science in North America has been profound. A study of their writings is one of the most expeditious ways to explore the core of political science; comparing and contrasting the positions both theorists have taken in assessing that core provides a comprehensive appreciation of the main options of the Western tradition. In fifty-three recently discovered letters, Strauss and Voegelin explore the nature (...)
     
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  40. Yvanka B. Raynova & Susanne Moser (eds.) (2005). Das integrale und das gebrochene Ganze: Zum 100. Geburtstag von Leo Gabriel. Peter Lang.
    Dieser Band präsentiert, gemeinsam mit anderen Beiträgen, die anlässlich der Gedenkfeier zum 100. Geburtstag von Leo Gabriel gehaltenen Vorträge am Institut für Philosophie der Universität Wien. Lange vor den gegenwärtigen Bestrebungen zu einer europäischen Integration hat Gabriel die Entwicklung der geistigen Gestalten Europas und das Verhältnis von Einheit und Vielheit integrativ zu erfassen versucht. Die Autorinnen und Autoren erörtern die Quellen sowie die Aktualität des integralen Denkens und vergleichen es mit phänomenologisch-existentialistischen, hermeneutischen, strukturalistischen und postmodernen Theorien. Überdies beinhaltet der Band (...)
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  41.  4
    Georges Tamer (2001). Islamische Philosophie Und Die Krise der Moderne: Das Verhältnis von Leo Strauss Zu Alfarabi, Avicenna Und Averroes. Brill.
    This monograph deals with Leo Strauss's reception of the medieval Islamic Philosophy in the context of his reaction towards the problems of modernity. Using reconstructed material, the book introduces a different approach to Strauss developing a new perspective on the Islamic political philosophy.
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  42.  76
    John Campbell (2006). Does Visual Reference Depend on Sortal Classification? Reply to Clark. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):221-237.
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  43. Anne Norton (2004). Leo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  44.  41
    Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (1995). Reply to Clark and Smolensky: Do Connectionist Minds Have Beliefs? In C. Macdonald & Graham F. Macdonald (eds.), Connectionism: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Blackwell
  45.  70
    Keith Butler (1993). On Clark on Systematicity and Connectionism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (1):37-44.
  46.  73
    Mark Bevir (2007). Esotericism and Modernity: An Encounter with Leo Strauss. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2):201-218.
    Strauss championed a philosophy of history according to which philosophers characteristically hide their actual beliefs when writing about ethics and politics. This paper begins by suggesting that an esoteric philosophy of history encourages a set of specific biases when writing histories of philosophy. Proponents of esotericism are liable to be far too ready to conclude that philosophers intended to hide their beliefs; they are likely to be insufficiently attuned to the varied contexts in which philosophers write; and they are likely (...)
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  47. David Novak (1996). Leo Strauss and Judaism Jerusalem and Athens Critically Revisited.
     
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  48.  36
    Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Kim Plunkett & Mark H. Johnson (1998). What Does It Mean to Claim That Something Is 'Innate'? Response to Clark, Harris, Lightfoot and Samuels. Mind and Language 13 (4):588-597.
  49.  37
    Joseph Levine (2004). Thoughts on Sensory Representation: A Commentary on Austen Clark's a Theory of Sentience. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):541-551.
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  50.  29
    David Gordon (1988). Clark on Tracing Mental Images. Analysis 48 (January):50-51.
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