Search results for 'Leo Clark' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susan R. Martyn, Richard Wright & Leo Clark (1988). Required Request for Organ Donation: Moral, Clinical, and Legal Problems. Hastings Center Report 18 (2):27-34.score: 240.0
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  2. Tom Moore, David Alpren, Susan Martyn, Richard Wright & Leo Clark (1989). Required Request Revisited. Hastings Center Report 19 (2):44-45.score: 240.0
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  3. Stephen R. L. Clark (2013). Dougherty (Ed.) Evidentialism and its Discontents_ (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Pp. Xii + 335. £45.00 (Hbk). ISBN 978 0 19 956350 0.

    Clark & VanArragon (Eds) _Evidence and Religious Belief
    (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Pp. X + 214. £35.00 (Hbk), £24.94 (Kindle). ISBN 9780 19 960371 8.
     [REVIEW]
    Religious Studies 49 (1):134-139.
    score: 210.0
    Book Reviews STEPHEN R. L. CLARK, Religious Studies , FirstView Article(s).
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  4. Andy Clark (2006). Andy Clark Cognitive Complexity and the Sensorimotor Frontier. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):43–65.score: 180.0
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  5. Philip Clark, Mackie's Motivational Argument Philip Clark.score: 180.0
    Mackie doubted anything objective could have the motivational properties of a value. In thinking we are morally required to act in a certain way, he said, we attribute objective value to the action. Since nothing has objective value, these moral judgments are all false. As to whether Mackie proved his error theory, opinions vary. But there is broad agreement on one issue. A litany of examples, ranging from amoralism to depression to downright evil, has everyone convinced that Mackie vastly overstated (...)
     
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  6. Colin Clark (1978). Colin Clark Replies to Peter Hunt. The Chesterton Review 4 (2):181-183.score: 180.0
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  7. Gilbert Clark & Enid Zimmerman (forthcoming). The Influence of Theoretical Frameworks on Clark and Zimmerman's Research About Art Talent Development. Journal of Aesthetic Education 31 (4).score: 180.0
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  8. Stephen Clark (1996). La Contribution de Stephen Clark à la Philosophie Sur Internet. Horizons Philosophiques 6 (2):95.score: 180.0
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  9. Clark Butler, Review of the Book Hegel and the Human Spirit A Translation of the Jena Lectures on the Philosophy of Spirit (1805–06) with Commentary by Leo Rauch. [REVIEW]score: 36.0
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  10. Nikolay Milkov (2004). Leo Tolstois Darlegung des Evangelium Und Seine Theologisch-Philosophische Ethik. Perspektiven der Philosophie 30:311-333.score: 24.0
    The paper discusses Leo Tolstoy's philosophy as developed in his works 'A Synoptic Presentation of the Four Gospels' and 'The Gospel in Brief'. Tolstoy considered Christian religion not as a belief but as an ethical doctrine about how to live, so that our life does not lose its meaning when confronted with the death. Jesus' doctrine teaches that we must lead our life following our spirit, not our flesh. This means that we must strive to understand other persons and to (...)
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  11. Paul Katsafanas (forthcoming). Review of Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick, The Soul of Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil. [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies.score: 24.0
    This is a contribution to a symposium on Clark and Dudrick’s The Soul of Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil. I focus on three aspects of their book. First, I critique Clark and Dudrick’s claim that Nietzsche recognizes a discrete “will to value.” Second, I argue that Clark and Dudrick’s reading of Nietzschean drives (Triebe) as homunculi is indefensible. Third, I raise questions about their claim that Nietzsche understands the self as a “normative ordering” of drives, which they (...)
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  12. Mohan P. Matthen (2004). Features, Places, and Things: Reflections on Austen Clark's Theory of Sentience. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):497-518.score: 24.0
    The paper argues that material objects are the primary referents of visual states -- not places, as Austen Clark would have it in his A Theory of Sentience.
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  13. Georges Rey (2004). A Deflated Intentionalist Alternative to Clark's Unexplanatory Metaphysics. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):519-540.score: 24.0
    Throughout his discussion, Clark speaks constantly of phenomenal and qualitative properties. But properties, like any other posited entities, ought to earn their explanatory keep, and this I don't think Clark's phenomenal or qualitative properties actually do. I argue that all the work he enlists for them could be done better by purely intentional contents of our sentient states; that is, they could better be regarded as mere intentional properties, not real ones. Clark eschews such intentionalism, but I (...)
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  14. Matthew Sharpe (2011). 'In the Court of a Great King': Some Remarks on Leo Strauss' Introduction to the Guide for the Perplexed. Sophia 50 (1):141-158.score: 24.0
    This essay, which will be divided between two SOPHIA editions, proposes to test the consensus in Maimonidean scholarship on the alleged intellectualism of Leo Strauss’ Maimonides by making a close interpretive study of Strauss’ 1963 essay ‘How to Begin to Study the Guide for the Perplexed’. While the importance of this essay, which is Strauss’ last extended piece on the Guide, is established in Maimonidean scholarship, its recognised esotericism has been matched by a dearth of detailed studies of the piece. (...)
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  15. Evan Selinger & Timothy Engström (2008). Interactive Computation is Interaction with What?: A Reply to Clark. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):347-348.score: 24.0
    In this response essay, we argue that Andy Clark’s assessment of our position on cyborgs is rooted in a misconception of the notion of “interaction” that we advance.
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  16. José Daniel Parra Quintero (2010). Between Carl Schmitt and Thomas Hobbes: A Study of Modern Liberalism From Leo Strauss' Thought. [Spanish]. Eidos 12:48-86.score: 24.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This essay presents a reading of modern liberalism from Leo Strauss´thought. Starting with his analysis of Carl Schmitt’s Concept of the Political and its critique of liberal “neutralization and depolitization”, Strauss posits an affirmation of the (...)
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  17. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  18. Mark Bevir (2007). Esotericism and Modernity: An Encounter with Leo Strauss. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2):201-218.score: 21.0
    Strauss championed a philosophy of history according to which philosophers characteristically hide their actual beliefs when writing about ethics and politics. This paper begins by suggesting that an esoteric philosophy of history encourages a set of specific biases when writing histories of philosophy. Proponents of esotericism are liable to be far too ready to conclude that philosophers intended to hide their beliefs; they are likely to be insufficiently attuned to the varied contexts in which philosophers write; and they are likely (...)
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  19. John Campbell (2006). Does Visual Reference Depend on Sortal Classification? Reply to Clark. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):221-237.score: 21.0
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  20. Stephen P. Stich & Ted A. Warfield (1995). Reply to Clark and Smolensky: Do Connectionist Minds Have Beliefs? In C. Macdonald & Graham F. Macdonald (eds.), Connectionism: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Blackwell.score: 21.0
  21. Joseph Levine (2004). Thoughts on Sensory Representation: A Commentary on Austen Clark's a Theory of Sentience. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):541-551.score: 21.0
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  22. Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Kim Plunkett & Mark H. Johnson (1998). What Does It Mean to Claim That Something Is 'Innate'? Response to Clark, Harris, Lightfoot and Samuels. Mind and Language 13 (4):588-597.score: 21.0
  23. Keith Butler (1993). On Clark on Systematicity and Connectionism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (1):37-44.score: 21.0
  24. David Gordon (1988). Clark on Tracing Mental Images. Analysis 48 (January):50-51.score: 21.0
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  25. Manuel García-Carpintero (1995). The Philosophical Import of Connectionism: A Critical Notice of Andy Clark's Associative Engines. Mind and Language 10 (4):370-401.score: 21.0
  26. Leo Strauss (2012). Leo Strauss on Moses Mendelssohn. The University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    Leo Strauss's introductions to ten writings of Moses Mendelssohn -- Preliminary remark by Alexander Altmann -- Introduction to Pope a metaphysician! -- Introduction to "Epistle to Mr. Lessing in Leipzig" -- Introduction to Commentary on Moses Maimonides' "Logical terms" -- Introduction to Treatise on evidence in metaphysical sciences -- Introduction to Phädon -- Introduction to Treatise on the incorporeality of the human soul -- Introduction to "On a handwritten essay of Mr. de Luc's" -- Introduction to The soul -- Introduction (...)
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  27. Leo Strauss (2013). Leo Strauss on Maimonides: The Complete Writings. The University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    Leo Strauss's essays and lectures on Maimonides -- Point of departure: why study medieval thinkers? -- How to study medieval philosophy (1944) -- On Maimonides -- Spinoza's critique of Maimonides (1930) -- Cohen and Maimonides (1931) -- The philosophic foundation of the law: Maimonides' doctrine of prophecy and its sources.
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  28. Leo Strauss (2001). Leo Strauss on Plato's Symposium. University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    The first major piece of unpublished work by Leo Strauss to appear in more than thirty years, "Leo Strauss On Plato's "Symposium"" offers the public the unprecedented experience of encountering this renowned scholar as his students did.
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  29. R. Beiner (1990). Arendt, Hannah and Strauss, Leo the Uncommenced Dialog. Political Theory 18 (2):238-254.score: 21.0
  30. Selmer Bringsjord (1988). Tracing Superman Again: A Reply to Clark's Superman, the Image. Analysis 48 (January):52-54.score: 21.0
     
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  31. Cropsey, Joseph & [From Old Catalog] (1964). Ancients and Moderns; Essays on the Tradition of Political Philosophy in Honor of Leo Strauss. New York, Basic Books.score: 21.0
  32. John Haugeland (2002). Andy Clark on Cognition and Representation. In Philosophy of Mental Representation. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 21.0
     
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  33. Leo Strauss (2002). Leo Strauss: The Early Writings (1921-1932). State University of New York Press.score: 21.0
    Presents the early published writings of the distinguished political philosopher Leo Strauss, available here for the first time in English. “Zank places at the reader’s disposal the young Strauss’s passionate advocacy of political Zionism and his early confrontations with Spinoza, consideration of whom helped lead Strauss to formulate his teaching on ‘the quarrel between the ancients and the moderns.’” — National Review.
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  34. Frederick R. Adams & Kenneth Aizawa, Andy Clark on Intrinsic Content and Extended Cognition.score: 18.0
    This is a plausible reading of what Clark and Chalmers had in mind at the time, but it is not the radical claim at stake in the extended cognition debate.[1] It is a familiar functionalist view of cognition and the mind that it can be realized in a wide range of distinct material bases. Thus, for many species of functionalism about cognition and the mind, it follows that they can be realized in extracranial substrates.[2] And, in truth, even some (...)
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  35. Christopher J. G. Meacham & Jonathan Weisberg (2003). Clark and Shackel on the Two-Envelope Paradox. Mind 112 (448):685-689.score: 18.0
    Clark and Shackel have recently argued that previous attempts to resolve the two-envelope paradox fail, and that we must look to symmetries of the relevant expected-value calculations for a solution. Clark and Shackel also argue for a novel solution to the peeking case, a variant of the two-envelope scenario in which you are allowed to look in your envelope before deciding whether or not to swap. Whatever the merits of these solutions, they go beyond accepted decision theory, even (...)
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  36. Ken Aizawa, Clark Missed the Mark: Andy Clark on Intrinsic Content and Extended Cognition.score: 18.0
    This is a plausible reading of what Clark and Chalmers had in mind at the time, but it is not the radical claim at stake in the extended cognition debate.[1] It is a familiar functionalist view of cognition and the mind that it can be realized in a wide range of distinct material bases. Thus, for many species of functionalism about cognition and the mind, it follows that they can be realized in extracranial substrates.[2] And, in truth, even some (...)
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  37. David J. Chalmers (2008). Foreword to Andy Clark's Supersizing the Mind. In Andy Clark (ed.), Supersizing the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    A month ago, I bought an iPhone. The iPhone has already taken over some of the central functions of my brain. It has replaced part of my memory, storing phone numbers and addresses that I once would have taxed my brain with. It harbors my desires: I call up a memo with the names of my favorite dishes when I need to order at a local restaurant. I use it to calculate, when I need to figure out bills and tips. (...)
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  38. Mark Timmons (1997). Will Cognitive Science Change Ethics?: Review Essay of Larry May, Marilyn Friedman & Andy Clark (Eds) Mind and Morals: Essays on Ethics and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):531 – 540.score: 18.0
    This paper contains an overview of the essays contained in the Mind and morals anthology plus a critical discussion of certain themes raised in many of these essays concerning the bearing of recent work in cognitive science on the traditional project of moral theory. Specifically, I argue for the following claims: (1) authors like Virginia Held, who appear to be antagonistic toward the methodological naturalism of Owen Flanagan, Andy Clark, Paul Churchland, and others, are really in fundamental agreement with (...)
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  39. John P. McCormick (1994). Fear, Technology, and the State: Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, and the Revival of Hobbes in Weimar and National Socialist Germany. Political Theory 22 (4):619-652.score: 18.0
    It is striking that one of the most consequential representatives of [the] abstract scientific orientation of the seventeenth century [Thomas Hobbes] became so personalistic. This is because as a juristic thinker he wanted to grasp the reality of societal life just as much as he, as a philosopher and a natural scientist, wanted to grasp the reality of nature.... [J]uristic thought in those days had not yet become so overpowered by the natural sciences that he, in the intensity of his (...)
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  40. Lawrence Shapiro & Shannon Spaulding (2009). Review of Andy Clark, Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).score: 18.0
    Andy Clark's Supersizing the Mind begins as a manifesto in which the components of an embodied theory of mind are carefully moved into place, proceeds to a defense of these components from recent critical attacks, and ends with words of caution to those who would seek to extract too much from the embodied perspective. Readers unfamiliar with Clark's earlier works are likely to find the result dazzling -- an exciting, novel, and coherent conception of the mind that dares (...)
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  41. William H. F. Altman (2007). Exotericism After Lessing: The Enduring Influence of F. H. Jacobi on Leo Strauss. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 15 (1):59-83.score: 18.0
    This study shows that despite the fact that Leo Strauss published little about Jacobi, the misunderstood thinker about whom he wrote his doctoral dissertation exercised a crucial influence on what is often thought to be Strauss's most enduring achievement: his rediscovery of exotericism. A consideration of several of Strauss's writings that do mention Jacobi but remained unpublished at the time of his death—in particular his studies on Moses Mendelssohn, who was Jacobi's principal target in the Pantheismusstreit—reveal (...)
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  42. Richard Schacht (2014). Clark and Dudrick's New Nietzsche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (2):339-352.score: 18.0
    Some analytic philosophers like to make “twin earth” thought-experiments, in which a second earth is imagined that is like this one in every respect but one. Maudemarie Clark and David Dudrick (henceforth C&D), in their long-awaited recent book on Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil (BGE1)—punningly entitled The Soul of Nietzsche’s Beyond Good and Evil2—(henceforth ‘Soul’), in effect present us with such an experiment. On each earth there was a Nietzsche, who wrote exactly the same things as the other one (...)
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  43. Jacob Schiff (2010). From Anti-Liberal to Untimely Liberal: Leo Strauss' Two Critiques of Liberalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (2):157-181.score: 18.0
    Leo Strauss’ ubiquitous presence in recent US foreign policy debates demands a thorough analysis of his critique of liberalism. I identify and explain a previously unnoticed transformation in that critique. Strauss’ Weimar critique of liberalism was philosophical and political; like Carl Schmitt, he sought philosophical grounds to replace liberalism with an authoritarian political system. However, post-emigration Strauss abandoned this political agenda, exclusively pursuing a philosophical critique that exposed modern liberalism’s purported weaknesses in order to strengthen its core. I accentuate this (...)
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  44. Thom Brooks (2005). Kantian Punishment and Retributivism: A Reply to Clark. Ratio 18 (2):237–245.score: 18.0
    In this journal, Michael Clark defends a "A Non-Retributive Kantian Approach to Punishment". I argue that both Kant's and Rawls's theories of punishment are retributivist to some extent. It may then be slightly misleading to say that by following the views of Kant and Rawls, in particular, as Clark does, we can develop a nonretributivist theory of punishment. This matter is further complicated by the fact Clark nowhere addresses Rawls's views on punishment: Rawls endorses a mixed theory (...)
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  45. Jonathan Hughes (2000). Consequentialism and the Slippery Slope: A Response to Clark. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):213–220.score: 18.0
    Michael Clark has recently argued that the slippery slope argument against voluntary euthanasia is ‘entirely consequentialist’ and that its use to justify continued prohibition of voluntary euthanasia involves a failure to treat patients who request assistance in ending their lives as ends in themselves. This article agues that in fact the slippery slope is consistent with most forms of deontology, and that it need not involve any violation of the principle that people should be treated as ends, depending upon (...)
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  46. Ron Amundson & Laurence D. Smith (1984). Clark Hull, Robert Cummins, and Functional Analysis. Philosophy of Science 51 (December):657-666.score: 18.0
    Robert Cummins has recently used the program of Clark Hull to illustrate the effects of logical positivist epistemology upon psychological theory. On Cummins's account, Hull's theory is best understood as a functional analysis, rather than a nomological subsumption. Hull's commitment to the logical positivist view of explanation is said to have blinded him to this aspect of this theory, and thus restricted its scope. We will argue that this interpretation of Hull's epistemology, though common, is mistaken. Hull's epistemological views (...)
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  47. Ryszard Mordarski (2006). Ostatni ezoterysta. Uwagi Leo Straussa o ezoterycznym charakterze twórczości Gottholda Ephraima Lessinga. Filo-Sofija 6 (1(6)):135-152.score: 18.0
    Author: Mordarski Ryszard Title: THE LAST ESOTERIC THINKER. LEO STRAUSS’S REMARKS ON THE ESOTERIC CHARACTER OF GOTTHOLD EPHRAIM LESSING’S WORKS (Ostatni ezoterysta. Uwagi Lea Straussa o ezoterycznym charakterze twórczości Gottholda Ephraima Lessinga) Source: Filo-Sofija year: 2006, vol:.6, number: 2006/1, pages: 135-152 Keywords: LEO STRAUSS, LESSING, ESOTERIC CHARACTER, MAIMONIDES Discipline: PHILOSOPHY Language: POLISH Document type: ARTICLE Publication order reference (Primary author’s office address): E-mail: www:According to Leo Strauss, the great thinkers of the political philosophy from Plato, through al-Farabi and Maimonides, to (...)
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  48. Laurence Lampert (1996). Leo Strauss and Nietzsche. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    The influential political philosopher Leo Strauss has been credited by conservatives with the recovery of the great tradition of political philosophy stretching back to Plato. Among Strauss's most enduring legacies is a strongly negative assessment of Nietzsche as the modern philosopher most at odds with that tradition and most responsible for the sins of twentieth-century culture--relativism, godlessness, nihilism, and the breakdown of family values. In fact, this apparent denunciation has become so closely associated with Strauss that it is often seen (...)
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  49. Heinrich Meier (2006). Leo Strauss and the Theological-Political Problem. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    By one of the most prominent interpreters of Leo Strauss's thought, this book is the first to examine the theme that Strauss considered to be key to his entire intellectual enterprise. The theologico-political problem refers to the confrontation between the theological and political alternative to philosophy as a way of life. Heinrich Meier clarifies the distinction between political theology and political philosophy and sheds new light on the unifying center of Strauss' philosophical work. The culmination of his work on the (...)
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