11 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Leo Cheung (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
  1. Leo K. C. Cheung (2014). Meaning, Use and Ostensive Definition in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations. Philosophical Investigations 37 (4):350-362.
    In this paper, I argue that the restricted claim in §43a of the Philosophical Investigations is that, for a large class of cases of word meanings, the meaning of a word is its use in the language. Although Wittgenstein does not provide any example of words having uses but no meaning as exceptions to the claim, he does hint at exceptions, which are names being defined, or explained, ostensively by pointing to their bearers, in §43b. Names in ostensive definitions, or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Leo K. C. Cheung (2013). On Two Versions of 'the Surprise Examination Paradox'. Philosophia 41 (1):159-170.
    In this paper, I consider a popular version of the clever student’s reasoning in the surprise examination case, and demonstrate that a valid argument can be constructed. The valid argument is a reductio ad absurdum with the proposition that the student knows on the morning of the first day that the teacher’s announcement is fulfilled as its reductio. But it would not give rise to any paradox. In the process, I criticize Saul Kripke’s solution and Timothy Williamson’s attack on a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Leo K. C. Cheung (2009). Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker – Edited by Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian and Oskari Kuusela. Philosophical Investigations 32 (3):281-285.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Leo K. C. Cheung (2008). The Disenchantment of Nonsense: Understanding Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 31 (3):197–226.
    This paper aims to argue against the resolute reading, and offer a correct way of reading Wittgenstein'sTractatus. According to the resolute reading, nonsense can neither say nor show anything. The Tractatus does not advance any theory of meaning, nor does it adopt the notion of using signs in contravention of logical syntax. Its sentences, except a few constituting the frame, are all nonsensical. Its aim is merely to liberate nonsense utterers from nonsense. I argue that these points are either not (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Leo K. C. Cheung (2006). The Unity of Language and Logic in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):22–50.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Leo K. C. Cheung (2005). Variable Names and Constant Names in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 28 (1):14–42.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Leo K. C. Cheung (2004). Showing, Analysis and the Truth-Functionality of Logical Necessity in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Synthese 139 (1):81 - 105.
    This paper aims to explain how the Tractatus attempts to unify logic by deriving the truth-functionality of logical necessity from the thesis that a proposition shows its sense. I first interpret the Tractarian notion of showing as the displaying of what is intrinsic to an expression (or a symbol). Then I argue that, according to the Tractatus, the thesis that a proposition shows its sense implies the determinacy of sense, the possibility of the complete elimination of non-primitive symbols, the analyticity (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Leo K. C. Cheung (2004). The Unification of Dao and Ren in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):313–327.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Leo K. C. Cheung (2001). The Way of the Xunzi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (3):301–320.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Leo K. C. Cheung (2000). The Tractarian Operation N and Expressive Completeness. Synthese 123 (2):247-261.
    The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, I visit the Fogelin–Geach-dispute, criticizeMiller''s interpretation of the Geachian notationN(x:N(fx)) and conclude that Fogelin''s argumentagainst the expressive completeness of the Tractariansystem of logic is unacceptable and that the adoptionof the Geachian notation N(x:fx) would not violate TLP5.32. Second, I prove that a system of quantificationtheory with finite domains and with N as the solefundamental operation is expressively complete. Lastly, I argue that the Tractarian system is apredicate-eliminated many-sorted theory (withoutidentity) with finite domains (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Leo K. C. Cheung (1999). The Proofs of the Grundgedanke in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Synthese 120 (3):395-410.
    The Tractatus contains twodifferent proofs of the Grundgedanke, or thenonreferentiality of logical constants. In thispaper, I explicate the first proof in TLP 5.4s andreconstruct the less explicitly stated second proof. My explication of the first proof shows it to beelegant but based on an invalid inference. In myreconstruction of the second proof, the main argumentis that the sign of a logical constant does not denotebecause it possesses the punctuation-mark-nature. Andit possesses the punctuation-mark-nature because,given the analyticity thesis in TLP 5, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation