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  1. Leonard B. Meyer (1983). Innovation, Choice, and the History of Music. Critical Inquiry 9 (3):517.
    Before going further, it will be helpful to consider briefly the notion that novelty per se is a fundamental human need. Experiments with human beings, as well as with animals, indicate that the maintenance of normal, successful behavior depends upon an adequate level of incoming stimulation—or, as some have put it, of novelty.2 But lumping all novelty together is misleading. At least three kinds of novelty need to be distinguished. Some novel patterns arise out of, or represent, changes in the (...)
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  2. Leonard B. Meyer (1979). Toward a Theory of Style. In Leonard B. Meyer & Berel Lang (eds.), The Concept of Style. University of Pennsylvania Press 3--44.
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  3. Leonard B. Meyer & Berel Lang (eds.) (1979). The Concept of Style. University of Pennsylvania Press.
     
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  4. Leonard B. Meyer (1976). Grammatical Simplicity and Relational Richness: The Trio of Mozart's G Minor Symphony. Critical Inquiry 2 (4):693.
    Few will, I think, doubt that the Trio from the Minuetto movement of Mozart's G Minor Symphony seems simple, direct, and lucid—even guileless. Its melodies are based upon common figures such as triads and conjunct diatonic motion. No hemiola pattern, often encountered in triple meter, disturbs metric regularity. With the exception of a subtle ambiguity..., rhythmic structure is in no way anomalous. There are no irregular or surprising chord progressions; indeed, secondary dominants and chromatic alterations occur very frequently. The instrumentation (...)
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  5. Gunther S. Stent & Leonard B. Meyer (1975). On Art and Science: A Reply to Leonard B. Meyer. Critical Inquiry 1 (3):683.
    I was surprised to note the critical tone of the discussion which my friend Leonard B. Meyer recently devoted in these pages to an article on the relation of art and science that I wrote for a popular scientific magazine. For I had believed all the while that in my article I was merely presenting to a general scientific audience a watered-down version of what I thought were Meyer's own views. Evidently I was mistaken in that belief, though I have (...)
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  6. Leonard B. Meyer (1974). Concerning the Sciences, the Arts: And the Humanities. Critical Inquiry 1 (1):163.
    Like a number of other writers, [Gunther S.] Stent contends that in essential ways science and art are comparable. As he puts it: "Both the arts and the sciences are activities that endeavor to discover and communicate truths about the world" . Although one cannot but sympathize with the desire to bring the so-called Two Cultures together, a viable and enduring union will not be achieved by ignoring or glossing over important differences. Using the behavior of scientists, artists, and laymen (...)
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  7. Leonard B. Meyer (1969). The Arts Today and Tomorrow. [Saskatoon]University of Saskatchewan.
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  8. Leonard B. Meyer (1967). Music, the Arts, and Ideas. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.
    The Postlude, written for this edition, looks back at the predictions made more than twenty-five years ago and speculates about what the coming decades may hold ...
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  9. Leonard B. Meyer (1959). Some Remarks on Value and Greatness in Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 17 (4):486-500.
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  10. Leonard B. Meyer (1957). Meaning in Music and Information Theory. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 15 (4):412-424.
  11. Leonard B. Meyer (1956). Emotion and Meaning in Music. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.
    Analyzes the meaning expressed in music, the social and psychological sources of meaning, and the methods of musical communication This is a book meant for ...
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