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Leonid I. Perlovsky [4]Leonid Perlovsky [3]
  1. Boris Kovalerchuk, Leonid Perlovsky & Gregory Wheeler (2012). Modeling of Phenomena and Dynamic Logic of Phenomena. Journal of Applied Non-Classical Logic 22 (1):1-82.
    Modeling a complex phenomena such as the mind presents tremendous computational complexity challenges. Modeling field theory (MFT) addresses these challenges in a non-traditional way. The main idea behind MFT is to match levels of uncertainty of the model (also, a problem or some theory) with levels of uncertainty of the evaluation criterion used to identify that model. When a model becomes more certain, then the evaluation criterion is adjusted dynamically to match that change to the model. This process is called (...)
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  2. Leonid Perlovsky (2012). Emotions of “Higher” Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):157-158.
    The target article by Lindquist et al. considers discrete emotions. This commentary argues that these are but a minor part of human emotional abilities, unifying us with animals. Uniquely human emotions are aesthetic emotions related to the need for the knowledge of cognition, including emotions of the beautiful, cognitive dissonances, and musical emotions. This commentary touches on their cognitive functions and origins.
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  3. Leonid Perlovsky (2012). Free Will and Advances in Cognitive Science. Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):32-37.
    Freedom of will is fundamental to morality, intuition of self, and normal functioning of society. However, science does not provide a clear logical foundation for this idea. This paper considers the fundamental argument against free will, so called reductionism, and why the choice for dualism against monism, follows logically. Then, the paper summarizes unexpected conclusions from recent discoveries in cognitive science. Classical logic turns out not to be a fundamental mechanism of the mind. It is replaced by dynamic logic. Mathematical (...)
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  4. Daniel S. Levine & Leonid I. Perlovsky (2008). Neuroscientific Insights on Biblical Myths. Zygon 43 (4).
     
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  5. Daniel S. Levine & Leonid I. Perlovsky (2008). Simplifying Heuristics Versus Careful Thinking: Scientific Analysis of Millennial Spiritual Issues. Zygon 43 (4):797-821.
    There is ample evidence that humans (and other primates) possess a knowledge instinct—a biologically driven impulse to make coherent sense of the world at the highest level possible. Yet behavioral decision-making data suggest a contrary biological drive to minimize cognitive effort by solving problems using simplifying heuristics. Individuals differ, and the same person varies over time, in the strength of the knowledge instinct. Neuroimaging studies suggest which brain regions might mediate the balance between knowledge expansion and heuristic simplification. One region (...)
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  6. Leonid I. Perlovsky (2007). Symbols: Integrated Cognition and Language. In R. Gudwin & J. Queiroz (eds.), Semiotics and Intelligent Systems Development. Idea Group Inc. 121--151.
  7. Leonid I. Perlovsky (2007). The Mind Vs. Logic: Aristotle and Zadeh. Critical Review 1 (1):30-33.
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