Search results for 'Lesbianism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susan K. Cahn (forthcoming). From the" Muscle Moll" to the" Butch" Ballplayer: Mannishness, Lesbianism, and Homophobia in US Women's Sport. Feminist Studies.score: 15.0
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  2. Max H. Kirsch (2000). Queer Theory and Social Change. Routledge.score: 6.0
    The emergence of queer theory represents a huge leap in our understanding of lesbian and gay peoples. It embodies a context for treating these people as worthy of consideration in their own rights and not as an appendage to general cultural theory. Max Kirsch argues that the current development of this area is in danger of repeating past mistakes in the construction of analyses, and ultimately, social movements. In this way, the book presents an alternative to the current fascination with (...)
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  3. David Bell & Gill Valentine (eds.) (1994). Mapping Desire: Geographies of Sexualities. Routledge.score: 6.0
    Discover the truth about sex in the city (and the country). Mapping Desire explores the places and spaces of sexuality from body to community, from the "cottage" to the Barrio, from Boston to Jakarta, from home to cyberspace. Mapping Desire is the first book to explore sexualities from a geographical perspective. The nature of place and notions of space are of increasing centrality to cultural and social theory. Mapping Desires presents the rich and diverse world of contemporary sexuality, exploring how (...)
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  4. William B. Turner (2000). A Genealogy of Queer Theory. Temple University Press.score: 6.0
    As such, the book will interest readers of gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender studies, intellectual history, political theory, and the history of gender/sexuality ...
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  5. Kath Weston (1998). Long Slow Burn: Sexuality and Social Science. Routledge.score: 6.0
    The last decade has seen the transformation of the study of sexuality from a marginalized effort to a fully respected discipline at many major universities. There are numerous publications devoted solely to the topic and queer theory, a force to be reckoned with, has its own celebrities. Nonetheless, queer studies is considered to be the brainchild of the humanities, with the social sciences slowly coming around to apply its principles to empirical research. Long, Slow Burn, a powerful collection of essays (...)
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  6. E. A. Grosz (1995). Space, Time, and Perversion: Essays on the Politics of Bodies. Routledge.score: 6.0
    Marking a ground-breaking moment in the debate surrounding bodies and "body politics," Elizabeth Grosz's Space, Time and Perversion contends that only by resituating and rethinking the body will feminism and cultural analysis effect and unsettle the knowledges, disciplines and institutions which have controlled, regulated and managed the body both ideologically and materially. Exploring the fields of architecture, philosophy, and--in a controversial way--queer theory, Grosz shows how these fields have conceptually stripped bodies of their specificity, their corporeality, and the vestigal traces (...)
     
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  7. Annamarie Jagose (1996). Queer Theory. Melbourne University Press.score: 6.0
  8. Annamarie Jagose (1996). Queer Theory: An Introduction. New York University Press.score: 6.0
    "Annamarie Jagose knows that queer theory did not spring full-blown from the head of any contemporary theorist. It is the outcome of many different influences and sources, including the homophile movement, gay liberation, and lesbian feminism. In pointing to the history of queer theory-a history that all too often is ignored or elided-Jagose performs a valuable service." -Henry Abelove, co-editor of The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader The political and academic appropriation of the term queer over the last several years (...)
     
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  9. Iain Morland & Annabelle Willox (eds.) (2005). Queer Theory. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 6.0
    What is queer theory? What does it do? Is queer theory only for queers? This vibrant anthology of ground breaking work by influential scholars, activists, performers, and visual artists is essential reading for anyone with an interest in sexuality studies. The fifteen articles--including one from Judith Butler, as well as an engaging introduction--map, contextualize, and challenge queer theory's project both within and beyond the academy. Summaries and suggestions for further reading make the volume an ideal course textbook.
     
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  10. Judith Butler (1989). The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva. Hypatia 3 (3):104 - 118.score: 3.0
    Julia Kristeva attempts to expose the limits of Lacan's theory of language by revealing the semiotic dimension of language that it excludes. She argues that the semiotic potential of language is subversive, and describes the semiotic as a poeticmaternal linguistic practice that disrupts the symbolic, understood as culturally intelligible rule-governed speech. In the course of arguing that the semiotic contests the universality of the Symbolic, Kristeva makes several theoretical moves which end up consolidating the power of the Symbolic and (...)
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  11. Simon Evnine, &Quot;interest in the Crotch:&Quot; A Reply.score: 3.0
    A reply to Sean Liam Kelly's analysis of Martial 7.35 in the Fall 1993 issue of Nexus. Although I am in substantial agreement with many parts of Kelly's analysis, one detail of the text which he did not pick up on leads me to offer a different route to Kelly's conclusion that, according to the narrator of the poem, Laecania insults his and his slave's virility, and that in response to this perceived unmanning, he replies with the charge of (...). However, the route I propose introduces into the itinerary not only issues of gender and violence, but also those of race. (shrink)
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  12. Julie K. Ward (1999). Reciprocity and Friendship in Beauvoir’s Thought. Hypatia 14 (4):36-49.score: 3.0
    : For Simone de Beauvoir, the opposition of subjects is not inescapable as it may be resolved by a relation of reciprocal recognition. I discuss formulations of reciprocity and the problem of the other as outlined in Beauvoir's 1927 diary and her memoir, La Force de l'âge, then turn to examine the account of lesbianism in Le Deuxième sexe.
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  13. A. Dreger, E. K. Feder & A. Tamar-Mattis (2012). Prenatal Dexamethasone for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: An Ethics Canary in the Modern Medical Mine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (3):277-294.score: 3.0
    Following extensive examination of published and unpublished materials, we provide a history of the use of dexamethasone in pregnant women at risk of carrying a female fetus affected by congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). This intervention has been aimed at preventing development of ambiguous genitalia, the urogenital sinus, tomboyism, and lesbianism. We map out ethical problems in this history, including: misleading promotion to physicians and CAH-affected families; de facto experimentation without the necessary protections of approved research; troubling parallels to the (...)
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  14. Greta Gaard (2011). Green, Pink, and Lavender: Banishing Ecophobia Through Queer Ecologies. Ethics and the Environment 16 (2):115-126.score: 3.0
    In 1995, when I was actively speaking and organizing in the U.S. Greens, a lesbian delegate from Colorado approached me with a dilemma: her state had put forth a constitutional amendment that would strip civil rights protections from gays, lesbians, and bisexuals. She felt passionate about environmental politics but feared for her life if this amendment passed. Where should she direct her political energy? Which part of her identity should she prioritize: her ecological self, or her lesbianism?When progressive political (...)
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