Search results for 'Leslie Jordan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mitchell M. Handelsman, Amos Martinez, Sarah Geisendorfer, Leslie Jordan, Laura Wagner, Pamela Daniel & Shanna Davis (1995). Does Legally Mandated Consent to Psychotherapy Ensure Ethical Appropriateness?: The Colorado Experience. Ethics and Behavior 5 (2):119 – 129.score: 240.0
    We analyzed a sample of 356 forms containing information that Colorado law legally requires both licensed and unlicensed therapists to disclose to clients. The majority of forms contained the legally mandated information; fewer forms contained ethically desirable information. The average readability grade level was 15.74, corresponding to upper-level college, and 63.9% of the forms reached the highest (most difficult) readability grade of 17 +. Therapists are obeying the law, but do not appear to be taking advantage of the opportunity to (...)
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  2. E. Jordan (1912). Dr. Jordan and Spencer's Unknowable: Reply. Philosophical Review 21 (3):359.score: 180.0
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  3. M. H. Jameson, D. R. Jordan & R. D. Kotansky (1996). A Lex Sacra From Selinous,(Borimir Jordan). American Journal of Philology 117:326-328.score: 180.0
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  4. John Leslie (1992). Time and the Anthropic Principle. Mind 101 (403):521-540.score: 60.0
    Carter’s anthropic principle reminds us that intelligent life can find itself only in life-permitting times, places or universes. The principle concerns a possible observational selection effect, not a designing deity. It has no special concern with humans, nor does it say that intelligent life is inevitable and common. Barrow and Tipler, who discuss all this, are not biologically ignorant. As argued in "Universes" (Leslie, 1989) they may well be right in thinking that "fine tuning" of force strengths and particle (...)
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  5. Jeff Jordan (2006). Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Is it reasonable to believe in God even in the absence of strong evidence that God exists? Pragmatic arguments for theism are designed to support belief even if one lacks evidence that theism is more likely than not. Jeff Jordan proposes that there is a sound version of the most well-known argument of this kind, Pascal's Wager, and explores the issues involved - in epistemology, the ethics of belief, decision theory, and theology.
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  6. John Leslie (2001). Infinite Minds: A Philosophical Cosmology. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The cosmos exists just because of the ethical need for it We, and all the intricate structures of our universe, exist as thoughts in a divine mind that knows everything worth knowing. There could also be infinitely many other universes in this mind....It may be hard to believe that the universe is as Leslie says it is--but it is also hard to resist his compelling ideas and arguments.
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  7. Julian C. Leslie (2000). Does Conditioned Suppression Measure the Resistance to Change of Operant Behaviour? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):103-104.score: 60.0
    Although conditioned suppression has face validity as a technique for assessing resistance to change of operant behaviour, it is not discussed by Nevin & Grace. However, application of their approach to the results of a conditioned suppression study that varied food deprivation and reinforcement magnitude (Leslie 1977) produces paradoxical results.
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  8. John Leslie (1996). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. The End of the World is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. (...)
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  9. Rudolf[from old catalog] Jordan (2007). We Are Ancestors. Cartwright Pr.score: 60.0
    We are Ancestors or The Age of Responsibility by Rudolf Jordan CAPE TIMES LIMITED CAPE TOWN 1941 PREFACE THIS treatise outlines the Philosophy of Responsibility ...
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  10. Jeff Jordan (1995). Is It Wrong to Discriminate on the Basis of Homosexuality? Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):39-52.score: 30.0
  11. Sarah-Jane Leslie (2008). Generics: Cognition and Acquisition. Philosophical Review 117 (1):1-47.score: 30.0
    Ducks lay eggs' is a true sentence, and `ducks are female' is a false one. Similarly, `mosquitoes carry the West Nile virus' is obviously true, whereas `mosquitoes don't carry the West Nile virus' is patently false. This is so despite the egg-laying ducks' being a subset of the female ones and despite the number of mosquitoes that don't carry the virus being ninety-nine times the number that do. Puzzling facts such as these have made generic sentences defy adequate semantic treatment. (...)
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  12. Daniel Howard-Snyder & Jeff Jordan (eds.) (1996). Faith, Freedom, and Rationality: Philosophy of Religion Today. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 30.0
    This collection of essays is dedicated to William Rowe, with great affection, respect, and admiration. The philosophy of religion, once considered a deviation from an otherwise analytically rigorous discipline, has flourished over the past two decades. This collection of new essays by twelve distinguished philosophers of religion explores three broad themes: religious attitudes of faith, belief, acceptance, and love; human and divine freedom; and the rationality of religious belief. Contributors include: William Alston, Robert Audi, Jan Cover, Martin Curd, Peter van (...)
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  13. John Leslie (1989). Universes. Routledge.score: 30.0
    One of the first books to address what has come to be known as the philosophy of cosmology, Universes asks, "Why does the universe exist?", arguing that the universe is "fine tuned for producing life." For example, if the universe's early expansion speed had been smaller by one part in a million, then it would have recollapsed rapidly; with an equivalently tiny speed increase, no galaxies would have formed. Either way, this universe would have been lifeless.
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  14. John Leslie (1983). Observership in Cosmology: The Anthropic Principle. Mind 92 (368):573-579.score: 30.0
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  15. Sarah-Jane Leslie (2007). Generics and the Structure of the Mind. Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):375–403.score: 30.0
  16. Alan M. Leslie & Brian J. Scholl (1999). Modularity, Development and 'Theory of Mind'. Mind and Language 14 (1):131-153.score: 30.0
    Psychologists and philosophers have recently been exploring whether the mechanisms which underlie the acquisition of ‘theory of mind’ (ToM) are best charac- terized as cognitive modules or as developing theories. In this paper, we attempt to clarify what a modular account of ToM entails, and why it is an attractive type of explanation. Intuitions and arguments in this debate often turn on the role of develop- ment: traditional research on ToM focuses on various developmental sequences, whereas cognitive modules are thought (...)
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  17. Joshua Knobe, Adam Cohen & Alan Leslie (2006). Acting Intentionally and the Side-Effect Effect: 'Theory of Mind' and Moral Judgment. Psychological Science 17:421-427.score: 30.0
    The concept of acting intentionally is an important nexus where ‘theory of mind’ and moral judgment meet. Preschool children’s judgments of intentional action show a valence-driven asymmetry. Children say that a foreseen but disavowed side-effect is brought about 'on purpose' when the side-effect itself is morally bad but not when it is morally good. This is the first demonstration in preschoolers that moral judgment influences judgments of ‘on-purpose’ (as opposed to purpose influencing moral judgment). Judgments of intentional action are usually (...)
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  18. Matthew Carey Jordan (2010). Bioethics and "Human Dignity&Quot;. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):180-196.score: 30.0
    The term "human dignity" is the source of considerable confusion in contemporary bioethics. It has been used by Kantians to refer to autonomy, by others to refer to the sanctity of life, and by still others (e.g., the President’s Council on Bioethics) to refer—albeit obliquely—to an important but infrequently discussed set of human goods. In the first part of this article, I seek to disambiguate the notion of human dignity. The second part is a defense of the philosophical utility of (...)
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  19. John Leslie (1990). Is the End of the World Nigh? Philosophical Quarterly 40 (158):65-72.score: 30.0
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  20. John Leslie (2007). Immortality Defended. Blackwell Pub..score: 30.0
    Might we be parts of a divine mind? Could anything like an afterlife make sense? Starting with a Platonic answer to why the world exists, Immortality Defended suggests we could well be immortal in all of three separate ways. Tackles the fundamental questions posed by our very existence, among them ‘why does the cosmos exist?’, ‘is there a divine mind or God?’ and ‘in what sense might we have afterlives?’ Defends a belief in immortality, without the need for a religious (...)
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  21. Jeff Jordan (2004). Divine Love and Human Suffering. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 56 (2/3):169 - 178.score: 30.0
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  22. John Leslie (2010). The Risk That Humans Will Soon Be Extinct. Philosophy 85 (4):447-463.score: 30.0
    If it survives for a little longer, the human race will probably start to spread across its galaxy. Germ warfare, though, or environmental collapse or many another factor might shortly drive humans to extinction. Are they likely to avoid it? Well, suppose they spread across the galaxy. Of all humans who would ever have been born, maybe only one in a hundred thousand would have lived as early as you. If, in contrast, humans soon became extinct then because of the (...)
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  23. Jeff Jordan (1998). Pascal's Wager Revisited. Religious Studies 34 (4):419-431.score: 30.0
    Pascal's wager attempts to provide a prudential reason in support of the rationality of believing that God exists. The wager employs the idea that the utility of theistic belief, if true, is infinite, and in this way, the expected utility of theism swamps that of any of its rivals. Not surprisingly the wager generates more than a good share of philosophical criticism. In this essay I examine two recent objections levelled against the wager and I argue that each fails. Following (...)
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  24. John Leslie (2008). Infinitely Long Afterlives and the Doomsday Argument. Philosophy 83 (4):519-524.score: 30.0
    A recent book of mine defends three distinct varieties of immortality. One of them is an infinitely lengthy afterlife; however, any hopes of it might seem destroyed by something like Brandon Carter's 'doomsday argument' against viewing ourselves as extremely early humans. The apparent difficulty might be overcome in two ways. First, if the world is non-deterministic then anything on the lines of the doomsday argument may prove unable to deliver a strongly pessimistic conclusion. Secondly, anything on those lines may break (...)
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  25. Jeff Jordan (1994). The St. Petersburg Paradox and Pascal's Wager. Philosophia 23 (1-4):207-222.score: 30.0
  26. Sarah-Jane Leslie (2007). Moderately Sensitive Semantics. In G. Preyer (ed.), Context Sensitivity and Semantic Minimalism. Oxford University Press. 133--168.score: 30.0
  27. Jeff Jordan (2002). Pascal's Wagers. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):213–223.score: 30.0
    Pascal is best known among philosophers for his wager in support of Christian belief. Since Ian Hacking’s classic article on the wager, three versions of the wager have been recognized within the concise paragraphs of the Pensées. In what follows I argue that there is a fourth to be found there, a version that in many respects anticipates the argument of William James in his 1896 essay “The Will to Believe.” This fourth wager argument, I contend, differs from the better-known (...)
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  28. Brian J. Scholl & Alan M. Leslie (1999). Modularity, Development and "Theory of Mind". Mind and Language 14 (1):131-153.score: 30.0
    Psychologists and philosophers have recently been exploring whether the mechanisms which underlie the acquisition of ‘theory of mind’ (ToM) are best charac- terized as cognitive modules or as developing theories. In this paper, we attempt to clarify what a modular account of ToM entails, and why it is an attractive type of explanation. Intuitions and arguments in this debate often turn on the role of _develop-_ _ment_: traditional research on ToM focuses on various developmental sequences, whereas cognitive modules are thought (...)
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  29. Jeff Jordan (2009). Review of William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion: Selected Writings , Edited by Nick Trakakis. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):495-496.score: 30.0
    ‘William L. Rowe on Philosophy of Religion’ edited by Nick Trakakis, collects 30 papers of William Rowe's important work in the philosophy of religion. I review this collection, and offer an objection of one of Rowe's arguments.
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  30. Sarah-Jane Leslie (forthcoming). The Original Sin of Cognition: Fear, Prejudice, and Generalization. Journal of Philosophy.score: 30.0
  31. Jeff Jordan (2006). Does Skeptical Theism Lead to Moral Skepticism? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (2):403 - 417.score: 30.0
    The evidential argument from evil seeks to show that suffering is strong evidence against theism. The core idea of the evidential argument is that we know of innocent beings suffering for no apparent good reason. Perhaps the most common criticism of the evidential argument comes from the camp of skeptical theism, whose lot includes William Alston, Alvin Plantinga, and Stephen Wykstra. According to skeptical theism the limits of human knowledge concerning the realm of goods, evils, and the connections between values, (...)
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  32. J. Scott Jordan & Marcello Ghin (2007). The Role of Control in a Science of Consciousness: Causality, Regulation and Self-Sustainment. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (1):177-197.score: 30.0
    There is quite a bit of disagreement in cognitive science regarding the role that consciousness and control play in explanations of how people do what they do. The purpose of the present paper is to do the following: (1) examine the theoretical choice points that have lead theorists to conflicting positions, (2) examine the philosophical and empirical problems different theories encounter as they address the issue of conscious agency, and (3) provide an integrative framework (Wild Systems Theory) that addresses these (...)
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  33. Ron Mallon, Alan M. Leslie & Jennifer DiCorcia, Transgressors, Victims, and Cry Babies: Is Basic Moral Judgment Spared in Autism? Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    of (from Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) forthcoming in Social Neuroscience. [nearly final draft in .pdf] An empirical investigation of moral judgment in autism.
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  34. Robert Welsh Jordan (1974). Intentionality in General. Research in Phenomenology 4 (1):7-12.score: 30.0
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  35. E. Sekerka Leslie, P. Bagozzi Richard & Richard Charnigo (2009). Facing Ethical Challenges in the Workplace: Conceptualizing and Measuring Professional Moral Courage. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4).score: 30.0
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  36. Sarah-Jane Leslie (2008). 'If', 'Unless', and Quantification. In R. Stainton & C. Viger (eds.), Compositionality, Context, and Semantic Values.score: 30.0
    Higginbotham (1986) argues that conditionals embedded under quantifiers (as in ‘no student will succeed if they goof off’) constitute a counterexample to the thesis that natural language is semantically compositional. More recently, Higginbotham (2003) and von Fintel and Iatridou (2002) have suggested that compositionality can be upheld, but only if we assume the validity of the principle of Conditional Excluded Middle. I argue that these authors’ proposals (...)
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  37. Jeff Jordan (2001). Why Friends Shouldn't Let Friends Be Eaten: An Argument for Vegetarianism. Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):309-322.score: 30.0
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  38. Tim Jordan (1995). The Philosophical Politics of Jean-Franqois Lyotard. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (3):267-285.score: 30.0
    The systematic philosophical foundation for Jean-François Lyotard's postmodern and post-Marxist politics is described. The central principle of the right to create different "phrases" is uncovered and examined. The political consequences of this philosophical system are explored, leading to the conclusion that Lyotard's commitment to difference leads to political indifference. The philosophical roots of this indifference are detailed in Lyotard's Cartesian starting point and his analysis of Holocaust revisionism. This analysis reveals an idealist basis to Lyotard's philosophy of difference. Lyotard's concept (...)
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  39. Shaun Nichols, Stephen P. Stich & Alan M. Leslie (1995). Choice Effects and the Ineffectiveness of Simulation. Mind and Language 10 (4):437-45.score: 30.0
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  40. Matthew Carey Jordan (2011). Some Metaethical Desiderata and the Conceptual Resources of Theism. Sophia 50 (1):39-55.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that theists are extremely well-situated with respect to developing metaethical accounts that qualify as ‘robust’ versions of moral realism. In the first part of the essay, a number of metaethical desiderata are identified. In the second part, theistic strategies for accommodating those desiderata are explained and defended. The upshot is that, contrary to the received philosophical wisdom, there are good theoretical reasons for theistic philosophers to seek to develop metaethical accounts that ground moral facts in (...)
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  41. John Leslie (2000). Our Place in the Cosmos. Philosophy 75 (1):5-24.score: 30.0
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  42. John Leslie (1985). Book Review:The Riddle of Existence: An Essay in Idealistic Metaphysics Nicholas Rescher. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 52 (3):485-.score: 30.0
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  43. Elizabeth A. Behnke, Robert Welsh Jordan & Hubert Knoblauch (1986). Book Review. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 3 (1):79-90.score: 30.0
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  44. J. Scott Jordan & Marcello Ghin (2006). (Proto-) Consciousness as a Contextually Emergent Property of Self-Sustaining Systems. Mind and Matter 4 (1):45-68.score: 30.0
    The concept of contextual emergence has been introduced as a speci?c kind of emergence in which some, but not all of the conditions for a higher-level phenomenon exist at a lower level. Further conditions exist in contingent contexts that provide stability conditions at the lower level, which in turn accord the emergence of novelty at the higher level. The purpose of the present paper is to propose that (proto-) consciousness is a contextually emergent property of self-sustaining systems. The core assumption (...)
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  45. John Leslie (1983). Why Not Let Life Become Extinct? Philosophy 58 (225):329 - 338.score: 30.0
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  46. John Leslie (1991). Ensuring Two Bird Deaths with One Throw. Mind 100 (1):73-86.score: 30.0
  47. John Leslie (1988). No Inverse Gambler's Fallacy in Cosmology. Mind 97 (386):269-272.score: 30.0
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  48. David A. Rettinger & Augustus E. Jordan (2005). Articles: The Relations Among Religion, Motivation, and College Cheating: A Natural Experiment. Ethics and Behavior 15 (2):107 – 129.score: 30.0
    A natural experiment was conducted studying the relations among student cheating, motivation, religiosity, and attitudes toward cheating. Students enrolled in a dual religious/college curriculum were surveyed regarding their cheating behavior, attitudes toward cheating, religiosity, and learning/grade motivations toward classes. Business and liberal arts college students were represented. Results strongly support the following conclusions. First, grade orientation is associated with increases in self-reported cheating. Second, among these religious students, more religiosity correlates with reduced reports of cheating in all courses. This result (...)
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  49. J. Scott Jordan (2003). Emergence of Self and Other in Perception and Action: An Event-Control Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):633-646.score: 30.0
    The present paper analyzes the regularities referred to via the concept 'self.' This is important, for cognitive science traditionally models the self as a cognitive mediator between perceptual inputs and behavioral outputs. This leads to the assertion that the self causes action. Recent findings in social psychology indicate this is not the case and, as a consequence, certain cognitive scientists model the self as being epiphenomenal. In contrast, the present paper proposes an alternative approach (i.e., the event-control approach) that is (...)
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  50. J. Scott Jordan (1999). “Mind is Brain” is Trivial and Nonscientific in Both Neurobiology and Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):842-842.score: 30.0
    Gold & Stoljar reveal that adherence to the radical neuron doctrine cannot be maintained via appeals to scientific principles. Using arguments from (1) naturalism and materialism, (2) unification, and (3) exemplars, it is shown that the “mind-is-brain” materialism explicit in the trivial version of the neuron doctrine ultimately suffers the same theoretical fate. Cognitive science, if it is to adopt an ontology at all, would be better served by a metaphysically neutral ontology such as double-aspect theory or neutral monism.
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