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Letitia Meynell [17]Letitia Mercia Meynell [1]
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Profile: Letitia Meynell (Dalhousie University)
Profile: Letitia Mercia Meynell (Dalhousie University)
  1. Letitia Meynell (2014). Imagination and Insight: A New Acount of the Content of Thought Experiments. Synthese 191 (17):4149-4168.
    This paper motivates, explains, and defends a new account of the content of thought experiments. I begin by briefly surveying and critiquing three influential accounts of thought experiments: James Robert Brown’s Platonist account, John Norton’s deflationist account that treats them as picturesque arguments, and a cluster of views that I group together as mental model accounts. I use this analysis to motivate a set of six desiderata for a new approach. I propose that we treat thought experiments primarily as aesthetic (...)
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  2. Letitia Meynell (2013). Delusions of Gender: How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference. By Cordelia Fine. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2010. Brain Storm: The Flaws in the Science of Sex Differences. By Rebecca M. Jordan‐Young. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (3):684-689.
  3. Letitia Meynell (2013). Parsing Pictures: On Analyzing the Content of Images in Science. The Knowledge Engineering Review 28 (3): 327-345.
    In this paper I tackle the question of what basic form an analytical method for articulating and ultimately assessing visual representations should take. I start from the assumption that scientific images, being less prone to interpretive complication than artworks, are ideal objects from which to engage this question. I then assess a recent application of Nelson Goodman's aesthetics to the project of parsing scientific images, Laura Perini's ‘The truth in pictures’. I argue that, although her project is an important one, (...)
     
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  4. Melanie Frappier, Letitia Meynell & James Robert Brown (eds.) (2012). Thought Experiments in Science, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.
    From Lucretius throwing a spear beyond the boundary of the universe to Einstein racing against a beam of light, thought experiments stand as a fascinating challenge to the necessity of data in the empirical sciences. Are these experiments, conducted uniquely in our imagination, simply rhetorical devices or communication tools or are they an essential part of scientific practice? This volume surveys the current state of the debate and explores new avenues of research into the epistemology of thought experiments.
     
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  5. Letitia Meynell (2012). Evolutionary Psychology, Ethology, and Essentialism (Because What They Don't Know Can Hurt Us). Hypatia 27 (1):3-27.
    In 2002, Evolution and Human Behavior published a study purporting to show that the differences in toy preferences commonly attributed to girls and boys can also be found in male and female vervet monkeys, tracing the origin of these differing preferences back to a common ancestor. Despite some flaws in its design and the prima facie implausibility of some of its central claims, this research received considerable attention in both scientific circles and the popular media. In what follows, I survey (...)
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  6. Letitia Meynell (2012). The Politics of Pictured Reality : Locating the Object From Nowhere in fMRI. In Robyn Bluhm, Anne Jaap Jacobson & Heidi Lene Maibom (eds.), Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
  7. Timothy Krahn, Andrew Fenton & Letitia Meynell (2010). Novel Neurotechnologies in Film—a Reading of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. Neuroethics 3 (1):73-88.
    The portrayal of novel neurotechnologies in Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report serves to inoculate viewers from important moral considerations that are displaced by the film’s somewhat singular emphasis on the question of how to reintroduce freedom of choice into an otherwise technology driven world. This sets up a crisis mentality and presents a false dilemma regarding the appropriate use, and regulation, of neurotechnologies. On the one hand, it seems that centralized power is required to both control and effectively implement such technologies (...)
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  8. Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.) (2009). Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  9. Andrew Fenton, Letitia Meynell & Françoise Baylis (2009). Ethical Challenges and Interpretive Difficulties with Non-Clinical Applications of Pediatric fMRI. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):3-13.
    In this article, we critically examine some of the ethical challenges and interpretive difficulties with possible future non-clinical applications of pediatric fMRI with a particular focus on applications in the classroom and the courtroom - two domains in which children come directly in contact with the state. We begin with a general overview of anticipated clinical and non-clinical applications of pediatric fMRI. This is followed by a detailed analysis of a range of ethical challenges and interpretive difficulties that trouble the (...)
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  10. Andrew Fenton, Letitia Meynell & Francoise Baylis (2009). Responsibility and Speculation: On Possible Applications of Pediatric fMRI. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):1-2.
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  11. Letitia Meynell (2009). Introduction: Minding Bodies. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  12. Letitia Meynell (2009). Introduction: Minding Bodies.–Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell, Susan Sherwin. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press. 1--21.
  13. Letitia Meynell (2008). Pictures, Pluralism, and Feminist Epistemology: Lessons From “Coming to Understand”. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 1-29.
    Meynell’s contention is that feminists should attend to pictures in science as distinctive bearers of epistemic content that cannot be reduced to propositions. Remarks on the practice and function of medical illustration—specifically, images Nancy Tuana used in her discussion of the construction of ignorance of women’s sexual function (2004)—show pictures to be complex and powerful epistemic devices. Their affinity with perennial feminist concerns, the relation between epistemic subject and object, and the nature of social knowledge, are of particular interest.
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  14. Letitia Meynell (2008). Why Feynman Diagrams Represent. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):39 – 59.
    There are two distinct interpretations of the role that Feynman diagrams play in physics: (i) they are calculational devices, a type of notation designed to keep track of complicated mathematical expressions; and (ii) they are representational devices, a type of picture. I argue that Feynman diagrams not only have a calculational function but also represent: they are in some sense pictures. I defend my view through addressing two objections and in so doing I offer an account of representation that explains (...)
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  15. Letitia Meynell (2007). The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution by Elisabeth Lloyd. Hypatia 22 (3):218-222.
  16. Letitia Meynell (2007). The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution (Review). Hypatia 22 (3):218-222.
  17. Letitia Mercia Meynell (2001). Dredging the Third Wave. Social Philosophy Today 17:179-201.
    In this paper I examine third wave leminism in the hopes of shedding light on its relationship to the concurrent contemporary backlash against leminism . I investigate this by attempting to answer two questions. First, given the nature of the first and second waves, is the third wave appropriately so called? I tentatively conclude that it is not. Second, I ask whether the issue of identity, which is central to third wave analysis, is addressed well by third wavers. I suggest (...)
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